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By Marilyn on Nov 16, 2011 7:53 PM, concerning plant: Longleaf Lungwort (Pulmonaria 'Little Star')

I had this very blue and very beautiful flower in my garden at one time, but it died. It has the brightest and bluest flowers! It's a compact and small Pulmonaria.

It's worth searching for and planting just for the flowers! I loved it!

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By valleylynn on Nov 16, 2011 4:08 PM, concerning plant: Sedum (Hylotelephium spectabile 'Mr. Goodbud')

Won an Award of Garden Merit from the RHS in 2006.

Richer tones and better foliage than S. ‘Brilliant’.

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By valleylynn on Nov 16, 2011 3:49 PM, concerning plant: Stonecrop (Hylotelephium 'Class Act')

Received the Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

This plant won the Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit by impressing the judges with its compact, upright habit and full heads of the most stunning rose-pink punctuated by white buds. A winner in the garden and in the beds!

Dormancy Required for Growth

Will take low watering once established

These plants grow best in well-drained, lean soil. AVOID CHEMICAL SPRAYS

A good candidate for growing in the deep southern states.

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By jmorth on Nov 16, 2011 12:16 PM, concerning plant: Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta 'Chim Chiminee')

Each flower has a collar of unusual, quilled petals. Color - striking assortment in the brown/yellow range mostly.. Stands well, good weather resistance. Developed by T & M.
Can survive midwest winters occasionally, thusly a short-term perennial sometimes. Midwest climate often precipitates ground 'heaving' which often causes plant's demise.
Self-seeds and easily crosses with other R. hirtas. Resultant plants run from bizarre to beautiful. Bare ground (not-mulched) encourages self-seeding potential.

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By flaflwrgrl on Nov 16, 2011 11:48 AM, concerning plant: White Ash (Fraxinus americana)

The White Ash gets it's name from the glaucous undersides of the leaves. It is quite similar in appearance to the Green Ash, which makes identification difficult. The under sides of the leaves of White Ash are lighter in color than their upper sides, and the surface of the twigs of White Ash may be flaky. Green Ash leaves have nearly the same coloration on upper and lower sides, and twigs are smooth. Also, these two species tend to occupy different habitats, with the White Ash found in moist upland sites and Green Ash found in wet forests of floodplains or swamps, but there is some overlap in habitat distribution.
Emerald ash borer beetle threatens the entire North American Fraxinus genus. The emerald ash borer was accidentally introduced into the US & Canada in the 1990's and was detected in 2002. Since that time it has spread to 11 states and adjoining portions of Canada. At least 50 million ash trees have succumbed thus far. The threat is very real that it will kill most of the ash trees in North America. Emerald ash borer prefers the black ash & the green ash. The white ash usually is killed after the black & green ash trees are killed.
These trees are dioecious, with male and female flowers.
This is a larval plant for tiger swallowtail and mourning cloak butterflies.

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By Sharon on Nov 16, 2011 2:10 AM, concerning plant: Queen Anne's Lace (Daucus carota)

Queen Anne's Lace can be identified by a tiny single red or purple flower in the middle of a flat cluster of hundreds of tiny white flowers. It should not be confused with the poisonous water hemlock.

The first colonists arriving in America brought carrot seeds with them but the plant soon escaped from gardens and reverted to the wild state that we know as Queen Anne's Lace. The wild root is rich in vitamin A which is good for vision.

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By jmorth on Nov 16, 2011 2:07 AM, concerning plant: Sunflower (Helianthus annuus 'Lemon Aura')

Unique flower form, starburst type flower, semi double, pollenless. Excellent for cutting.

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By Sharon on Nov 16, 2011 1:57 AM, concerning plant: Bee Balm (Monarda didyma)

Monarda is native to eastern North America. It's endangered in some areas.

It is of the mint family, evidenced by its square stems and the strong scent of its leaves. The Native Americans at one time made tea from the dried leaves of Monarda didyma and shared it with the settlers, who went on to use it as a substitute when imported tea became scarce after the Boston Tea Party.

Some groups thought the tea effective in treating colds and sore throats while others steamed the plant and inhaled the fumes to clear sinuses.

The plant is not recommended for its medicinal use today, but the tea from the leaves is still popular in some areas.

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By Sharon on Nov 16, 2011 1:43 AM, concerning plant: Common Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis)

This plant is a North American native. Its yellow blooms exude a perfume that attracts the nocturnal sphinx moth, which pollinates it. It has been used by Native Americans for various ailments for years, but more recently it has become the focus of medical research. The plant may have an anti-clotting factor that would make it useful in the prevention of heart attacks. It has also been found that the oil of the evening primrose might help those who suffer from atopic eczema, asthma and from migraine. None of these drugs has been approved in the US, however.

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By Sharon on Nov 16, 2011 1:36 AM, concerning plant: Cowslip (Primula veris)

Cowslip grows in dry meadows and along roadsides. It's native to Eurasia, but is now a common escapee from gardens in temperate North America.

It's a perennial herb with long oval hairy leaves that form a basal rosette. It has yellow flowers in spring and they are marked with orange dots. They grow in hanging clusters on top of an unbranched leafless stalk.

In the past our ancestors used Cowslip for many purposes, some are still used by herbalists today: an expectorant, a mild painkiller, a diuretic and a laxative. Others have used it as a skin cleanser. None of these uses have been verified scientifically.

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By Sharon on Nov 16, 2011 1:24 AM, concerning plant: Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida)

In older times, as the dogwood began to bloom in spring, it signaled to the Native Americans that it was time to plant corn. They used the dogwood tree medicinally too. The bark was simmered in water and the extract was used to relieve sore and aching muscles. They made a tea of the bark to promote sweating, to relieve fevers. At one time during the Civil War, when quinine was not available, tea from the dogwood tree bark was used to treat malaria.

Those are ancient beliefs and there is no reason now to believe they are true. But there is one fact that I know to be true: when the dogwoods are blooming the fish are biting in Kentucky and Barkley Lakes!

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By jmorth on Nov 16, 2011 1:18 AM, concerning plant: Triandrus Daffodil (Narcissus 'Ice Wings')

Can force; bulbs may then be planted outside for blooms in following years.
Long standing and long lasting. Returns reliably in the garden for years. Very stately, a beauty to behold!
One of my favorites, w/o a doubt.

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By jmorth on Nov 16, 2011 1:10 AM, concerning plant: Jacinthe Romaine (Bellevalia romana)

Needs placed in a spot that drains well.

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By Sharon on Nov 15, 2011 11:56 PM, concerning plant: Comfrey (Symphytum officinale)

Comfrey is one of those ancient medicinal plants that is still used externally. It was introduced into North America by settlers, and now grows wild in the eastern part of the continent. It is also widely cultivated by herbalists.

It grows in wet places; it's usually about 3 feet high with oval dark green leaves on an erect hairy stem that branches at the top. The lower leaves are generally much longer than those at the top of the stem. It has purplish bell shaped flowers that bloom in clusters in summer.

It was used in ancient times for a number of problems, but contemporary usage by herbalists includes surface treatment for psoriasis and other skin problems by way of ointments made from the plant.

Comfrey leaves are in large part protein and are used often for fodder for livestock.

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By Sharon on Nov 15, 2011 11:18 PM, concerning plant: American Mistletoe (Phoradendron leucarpum)

In ancient times mistletoe was magic, it was considered a life saver and a panacea for many ailments. Because it grew from a host plant and its roots were not inground, the ancients revered it. There are many legends associated with mistletoe.

Our present day custom of exchanging kisses under a sprig of mistletoe is from the ancient belief that mistletoe signified life and fertility, the opposite of death. The kiss was to welcome life.

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By Sharon on Nov 15, 2011 11:09 PM, concerning plant: Horehound (Marrubium vulgare)

Horehound is of the mint family and though introduced from Europe, it now grows wild in North America.

The plant is a source of flavoring for candies, teas, and syrups used in folk medicine as cough and cold remedies. Pharmacologists agree that it is likely an expectorant. It is also sometimes used by herbalists as an appetite stimulant.

A decoction of horehound mixed with honey produces a syrup used to inhibit coughing, but my personal favorite is the candy that is made from it in much the same way and is used as a cough drop.

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By Sharon on Nov 15, 2011 11:02 PM, concerning plant: Hops (Humulus lupulus)

This plant is most commonly associated with beer. It gives the beverage it's slightly bitter taste but it also preserves it. The bitters are found only in the ripe conelike fruits of the female plant.

Native Americans made a sedative from the blooms of hops and they also applied dried heated flowers to relieve toothaches. Herbalists value the plant for its sedative properties and pharmacologists agree that the plant most likely has a sedative effect.

It's native to both North America and Europe and grows mostly in waste areas.

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By Sharon on Nov 15, 2011 10:49 PM, concerning plant: Giant Goldenrod (Solidago gigantea)

Goldenrod is native to the US. It's a perennial herb growing 20 - 40 inches tall with narrow dark green leaves that can be up to 5 inches long. The flowerhead clusters bloom in my area (Kentucky) in September.

The yellow flowerheads are a good source of yellow dye.

It was once badly maligned as a cause of hay fever, but its pollen is not airborne. Its pollen is carried by bees and other insects. It blooms at the same time as ragweed, though the flowers of ragweed are not noticeable. Ragweed pollen is airborne, and is the cause of hay fever.

Goldenrod is the state flower of Kentucky.

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By Sharon on Nov 15, 2011 10:36 PM, concerning plant: Briar Rose (Rosa canina)

Native to Europe, the dog rose is naturalized in much of eastern North America. It grows along sunny roadsides, along the edge of woods and as hedges. It's a perennial shrub, growing as bushes about 6 - 10 feet tall. The stems have hooked thorns; the leaves are smoother and greener than garden roses. The flowers appear from May to July and are usually pale pink on long stalks.

The hips are usually 1/2 to 1 inch long. They are a rich source of vitamin C. They can be eaten right from the plant, but are most commonly used to make rose hip jelly.

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By Sharon on Nov 15, 2011 10:19 PM, concerning plant: Dills (Anethum graveolens)

Dill is used primarily in the kitchen, but there was a time when it was used medicinally. Dill water made from the oil of dill is a folk remedy for infant colic as well as for digestive problems in older children. In the kitchen, dill is used as a pickling spice and to flavor sauces, salads and fish.

Do not confuse this plant with water hemlock or poison hemlock, both of which are poisonous.

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