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By Sequoiadendron4 on Oct 14, 2017 6:38 AM, concerning plant: Firethorn (Pyracantha 'Mohave')

If someone told me five years ago how bad of an idea it'd be to plant a pyracantha hedge, I wouldn't have planted it. The plants are beautiful and berry heavy. They are strong growers too. The only downside is scab. Scab is a fungal affliction that produces black sooty spots on the leaves and berries. On the leaves it's not really detrimental. Affected leaves fall off but are replaced at a faster pace so it's not noticeable. The berries get totally trashed by scab, which stinks because that's the main reason to grow the shrub. Birds don't eat the scabbed berries. To prevent this, one must spray the entire plant every 7-10 days with fungicide from the time of leaf emergence until the flowers are spent. That's a tall order for 60' of shrubs that are 8-10' tall. So in conclusion, this is a nice plant for a specimen or two but probably not the best hedge.

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By ScotTi on Oct 13, 2017 5:05 PM, concerning plant: XVriecantarea 'Julietta'

XVriecantarea 'Julietta' ( formerly Alcantarea 'Julietta') makes for a great large specimen in a pot or the landscape with its purple red coloring with a 5'-6' spread.
Hybridized by David Fell of Hawaii

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By Australis on Oct 13, 2017 4:45 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Templestowe's Charm 'Julie')

First public showing was the Cymbidium Orchid Society of Victoria (COSV) Spring Show in September 2017. This was from a remake of the grex, not the original crossing some 10 years earlier.

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By Australis on Oct 13, 2017 4:45 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Templestowe's Charm 'Nicole')

First public showing was the Cymbidium Orchid Society of Victoria (COSV) Spring Show in September 2017.

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By Australis on Oct 12, 2017 9:13 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium tracyanum 'New Start')

This is a known tetraploid owned by Royale Orchids (NSW, Australia) that is descended from Andy Easton's tracyanum lines.

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By membar on Oct 12, 2017 4:51 PM, concerning plant: Wild Muskmelon (Cucumis melo var. dudaim)

Hi!

I am looking for where to buy dudaim melons for consumption. I live in New York city. Can anyone help?I am also open to delivery by mail.

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By ScotTi on Oct 12, 2017 12:29 PM, concerning plant: Bromeliad (Androlepis skinneri)

Androlepis skinneri is native to Central America and southern Mexico. It is a popular large-growing terrestrial Bromeliad that can be grown in full sun conditions, where it will produce a intense red color. This is one of the few dioecious Bromeliads.

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By Australis on Oct 12, 2017 3:54 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Death Wish)

This grex and its offspring (i.e. Orchid (Cymbidium Arachnid)) seem more susceptible to frosts than most cool-growing Cymbidiums. A number of members of the Cymbidium Orchid Society of Victoria had plants damaged by a -1°C frost during this recent winter.

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By Australis on Oct 11, 2017 9:57 PM, concerning plant: Splendid Cymbidium (Cymbidium insigne)

It is worth noting that there are actually several white forms of this species. The first, often referred to as Cym. insigne var. album, is white but is not actually a true alba (i.e. it still produces anthocyanins).

A true alba (which despite the bad Latin is usually referred to as "insigne alba" to differentiate itself from the earlier white strain) has been in use for several decades and more recently, another alba form has been discovered in the wild and may be introduced into cultivation.

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By TBGDN on Oct 11, 2017 9:06 AM, concerning plant: Wilson's English Ivy (Hedera helix 'Wilsonii')

Wilson's English Ivy is cold hardy in Zones 5a/b, but may still be damaged somewhat in harsh winters or in exposed locations. I bought this cultivar in a "10-pack" with the express purpose of introducing it to climb on large mature oak trees. It has, after many years, done that real well, and has covered the trunks of two large trees up to a height of 20-25 feet. It has also withstood winter temperatures down to -20F with bone-chilling winds with no major damage. It can spread out at the base of trees and grow into grass. However, a shovel can be used to keep lateral growth in check around the tree base. Foliage is attractive year round, but is a fresh dark green in summer months.

I originally posted these comments at Dave's Garden back on March 11, 2006 when Dave & Trish were still at the helm over there. While taking some pictures this morning I realized there was no entry for me at NGA. Therefore I went out and took a few close up photos of the leaves and vines. I will post them here on October 11, 2017; 11 years after my original post at DG.

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By frahnzone5 on Oct 9, 2017 7:39 PM, concerning plant: Coral Bells (Heuchera villosa 'Citronelle')

This cultivar has been a consistent performer in my zone 5 garden. Beautiful, bright yellow-green foliage color all season long. I find it is best sited in part shade with protection from afternoon sun.

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By Pistil on Oct 8, 2017 10:25 PM, concerning plant: California Fuchsia (Epilobium septentrionale 'Select Mattole')

I planted this two years ago and it is terrific. This variety is a "Great Plant Pick" for the Pacific Northwest, but I worried my clay might be a problem. I put it in full sun on a slope in some rocks in my horrid clay soil. It blooms for at least 4 months nonstop, and the Hummingbirds like it. I water it about once every month when it does not rain, but it never wilts or seems to suffer (It's from California, after all). I have not seen any seedlings, and it is a clumper not a runner. It emerges late in the spring.

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By poisondartfrog on Oct 8, 2017 4:46 PM, concerning plant: Greasy Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris 'Fox Family Greasy')

Provided a continuous harvest all season in large containers with sapling supports. They were very delicious with meaty texture and overtly beanie flavor. I did not prepare any of these as shuck beans, but they are sturdy enough to use that way.

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By beaumbra001 on Oct 7, 2017 8:34 PM, concerning plant: Acorn Squash (Cucurbita pepo 'Sweet REBA')

Everyone should grow this cultivar of acorn squash! Given the proper time to ripen on the vine, this squash is so naturally sweet it is best eaten plain. The plants are extremely tolerant of subpar conditions and impressively resistant to powdery mildew. I guarantee, Sweet REBA will outperform the more common cultivars of acorn squash by far in resistance, fruit appearance, and most importantly taste!! Be sure to give it a try this year, you will not regret it!

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By valleylynn on Oct 7, 2017 5:25 PM, concerning plant: Scarlet Monardella (Monardella macrantha 'Marian Sampson')

I started out with the plant in March of 2015. I originally planted it in a mostly shaded area. It bloomed sparsely and became very leggy. In 2016 I moved it to full sun in fast draining sandy loam with a top dressing of chicken grit. This year it started blooming in early summer and is still going strong in October.
The leaves have a wonderful scent, bees and hummingbirds love the blooms.
I tried collecting seed this summer. Not sure if I have anything viable as I don't know what the seed should look like. Next spring I will try dividing it for new plants.
I understand that the life span of this plant is about 4 years.

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By valleylynn on Oct 7, 2017 8:14 AM, concerning plant: Hen and Chicks (Sempervivum arachnoideum 'Cebenese')

This is a lovely arachnoideum type semp when grown well. Observing it over the years I find that it does not do well in full sun during our 2 to 3 months of drought season here in the Pacific Northwest. It tends to burn easily under full sun conditions. If given some protection during the hottest part of the day, say 1/2 day sun or filtered bright light, they will reward you with a lovely colony of web covered semps. Most of the webbing disappears during the wet winter and spring months, but returns with vigor once things warm up and dry out.

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By DEDON on Oct 7, 2017 7:53 AM, concerning plant: Paradox Cinquefoil (Potentilla supina subsp. paradoxa)

This plant is extremely difficult to eradicate, slowly taking over areas of lawn grass, with the exception of soysia grass which chokes out (not completely) the ability to thrive. IMO, there are no effective herbicides. I have slowly pulled tap roots that are 20" long after two weeks of rain in Delaware. a VERY frustrating lawn week!

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By Australis on Oct 7, 2017 7:36 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Diane De Langhe)

The hybridiser, Andy Easton, describes this grex as effectively being a miniature and better Cym. tracyanum, as the plants are smaller and the blooms last approximately twice as long as the species whilst maintaining a shape similar to that of tracyanum. All plants originating from the original NHO cross were tetraploid albas.

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By Baja_Costero on Oct 6, 2017 9:13 PM, concerning plant: Kudu Lily (Pachypodium saundersii)

Shrubby caudiciform succulent with a fat body and narrow, spreading, spiny branches. Deciduous leaves appear toward the end of the branches. Can be spectacular in old age. White flowers in late summer, tinged with purple/pink. From South Africa, Swaziland, Mozambique, Zimbabwe.

Seasonal growth pattern features a summer growth spurt and winter dormancy, though some leaves may be retained through the winter in mild climates. Water more frequently in summer. Does not like cold (below 45-50°F), wet winters. Potentially a large plant (body to 3 feet wide), and stunted by underpotting. Responds well to pruning. Best form with very strong light (full sun in mild climates).

Formerly known as P. lealii saundersii, and closely related to P. lealii (from Namibia and Angola), a larger shrub or tree with a bottle shaped stem and pubescent leaves.

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By Australis on Oct 6, 2017 5:51 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Calanthe 'Kojima Green')

This is an unregistered hybrid created by Japanese hybridiser Mr. Kojima. Parentage is unknown.

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