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By Baja_Costero on Oct 3, 2017 5:54 PM, concerning plant: Pachypodium (Pachypodium bispinosum)

One of two similar-looking Pachypodiums which grow a buried caudex, often lifted after several years for display. Mature plants can be spectacular. Both species grow skinny above-ground stems as well, armed with spines and bearing leaves toward the end. Easily controlled with pruning. Protect the caudex from direct sun after lifting it to avoid scarring.

Flowers, borne at various times of year, are bell-like instead of the pinwheel configuration of P. succulentum. Otherwise the two species are not easy to tell apart. There are also hybrids with intermediate flowers. From the Eastern Cape province of South Africa, overlapping in distribution with P. succulentum (which also grows elsewhere).

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By bxncbx on Oct 3, 2017 5:43 PM, concerning plant: Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Big Rainbow')

Huge bicolor fruits! One slice is perfect for even larger slices of bread. Very meaty and juicy. I recommend leaving them on the vine until more red color shows for best flavor. If you do, best to use them within a day or so.

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By Pistil on Oct 3, 2017 1:54 PM, concerning plant: Sutherland Hebe (Veronica pinguifolia 'Sutherlandii')

Very hardy in Seattle area, steadily grows outward but can be pruned. Completely trouble free. Smothers weeds. Flowers are white, not showy against the light green foliage..

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By quercusnut on Oct 3, 2017 9:33 AM, concerning plant: Alocasia 'Brian Williams'

I have had this for about 7 years. Bought from Brian himself. Very tough. It survived our mild zone 7a winter 2017 in the pot in photo above ground.
Offsets readily. Great performer. Can get very large with good culture.

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By Scatterbrain on Oct 2, 2017 3:43 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Beat the Barons')

Very pretty little daylily which despite being evergreen thrives in a British climate. Was one of the first daylilies I bought and it was the picture of this variety in a gardening magazine that started my interest in daylilies.

Beautiful creamy yellow and deep dusky red eye.

Easy grower and laughs off wet and windy weather. Love it!

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By Scatterbrain on Oct 2, 2017 3:11 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Eyes a Blue')

One of only a handful of Lambertsons that I own as they generally don't do that well in my climate. This is one of the few exceptions as it always does well and thrives with little attention. A good increaser, flowers well but the flowers can sometimes get crowded on the scape.

The early flowers are almost identical to Blue-Eyed Butterfly, also by Lambertson, but the later flowers have a more elaborate eye.

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By ScotTi on Oct 2, 2017 1:55 PM, concerning plant: Summer Torch (Billbergia pyramidalis 'Concolor')

The variety 'Concolor' (Latin = the same color) lacks the purple coloring on the flower petal's edge, but maintains the purple coloring of the stigma. This cultivar has a rosette of broad glossy green leaves.

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By Weedwhacker on Oct 2, 2017 8:40 AM, concerning plant: Rat-Tail Radish (Raphanus sativus var. caudatus)

I grew this for the first time in 2017 and didn't plant the seeds until mid July, as an afterthought. The plants are pretty scraggly looking and for quite some time I was disappointed in that very few actual pods were forming, despite having lots of flowers. By late September, though, there were many pods to start harvesting; they're so tasty I'm not sure any are going to make it into the house to use in a stir-fry! As an added bonus, the flowers are very attractive to butterflies and bees. I definitely will be growing these again, they're a very interesting addition to the vegetable garden.

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By Scatterbrain on Oct 2, 2017 7:43 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Little Fat Cat')

Another of my favourite little ones. Lovely rich cream with lovely shape and substance and beautiful diamond dusting. Nice tall scapes and flowers for a long time.

Has no problem with British cold, wet and windy weather and always opens well even in long periods without sunshine. Always beautiful.

Pollen fertile but can't get pods on it here.

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By Scatterbrain on Oct 2, 2017 7:27 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Velvet Shadows')

Great little plant, has survived years of neglect planted in a pot which it outgrew a long time ago and still flowers its little heart out.

Beautiful rich red purple, not generally my favourite colour but it is so saturated here that it is gorgeous. Great for wet and windy gardens and will even flower in shade. Has small chalky eye zone.

Have promised it a much bigger pot and a better location next spring!

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By Scatterbrain on Oct 2, 2017 7:11 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Intricate Eyes')

One of my favourite Lambertsons for my climate (wet, cool and windy). Lovely pinky colour with very good eye, which is clear and bold for me even in less than ideal weather. In my garden it can sometimes be a bitone with much lighter sepals.

I always look forward to this one opening. Fertile both ways for me.

Lovely, lovely plant.

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By Scatterbrain on Oct 2, 2017 7:05 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Baby Blues')

Nice little plant. The colour tends to be more of a fleshy peach shade here rather than lavender, which isn't my favourite colour, but it is vigorous and produces lots of blooms once it is established.

Has produced pods and has fertile pollen too. In my garden it is one that sticks out the pistil before the flower opens so I have most success by pollinating it the night before the flower is going to open.

Has a very definite blue colour to the eye in colder weather, and the flower colour tends to be more of a lavender tone then. Stands up to rain and winds with no problems.

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By Scatterbrain on Oct 2, 2017 6:58 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Patchwork Puzzle')

One of my first daylilies and still a strong favourite, vigorous plant of soft primrose to light lemon depending upon the weather. In the UK sometimes the eye is a thin pencilled eye but other times it can be wider and verging on chalky, either way it is lovely.

Hasn't been fertile for me BUT it was sold as a TET and is always described as a tet but I notice that it is recorded as a dip. on this site and has child plants which are all dip. so I plan to treat it as a dip. next year and hope to get seed crosses from.it.

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By Scatterbrain on Oct 2, 2017 6:48 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Mystical Rainbow')

One of my clearest pinks here in the UK, true pink here not peachy, eye is not always clear in the UK climate but it is always beautiful. Good strong plant and fertile both ways here. In periods of good weather the eye is very pretty.

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By Scatterbrain on Oct 2, 2017 6:31 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Mokan Butterfly')

Mokan Butterfly is one of my favourites, it is very white for me in the North of England (Yorkshire, UK). Tolerates neglect. Love the eye colour which can be medium lavender purple to very dark blue-pure depending upon the weather.

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By GrandKidsDaylilyFarm on Sep 29, 2017 5:09 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Love Never Ends')

Love Never Ends is a beautiful flower when it is in its glory; however, the plant is sometimes very sensitive; it does not like to be transplanted; it does not like to not have water or fertilizer. When these things happen, the bloom will not be right; to achieve the correct bloom, the plant must be established for some time. With some tender loving care, the plant will respond to provide some of God's beauty. Even I, as the hybridizer, have had some blooms that did not look well, but in time and with care, they returned to their normal beauty.

The name comes from the Bible, Jesus' love for us never ends.

Charles Plaisance
Grand Kids Daylily Farm

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By sharface4 on Sep 28, 2017 5:57 PM, concerning plant: Creeping Gloxinia (Lophospermum erubescens LofosĀ® Wine Red)

I have 2 Lofos that did very well this summer, live in zone 5b and would like to bring them inside for the winter. Has anyone had luck bringing the plant inside?

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By GrandKidsDaylilyFarm on Sep 28, 2017 2:09 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Jeremy Chase')

Jeremy Chase was named by the late Helen Wheeler for her grandson; I obtained the plant while visiting Helen, who died of cancer later that year. She was very creative with her beautiful daylilies.

Charles Plaisance

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By farmerdill on Sep 27, 2017 4:43 PM, concerning plant: Hot Pepper (Capsicum annuum 'Sahuaro')

Large 9 inch green to red tapered fruits. Similar to Big Chile II but more vigorous. Very mild in the 500 Scu class. Much better leaf cover than Big Chile

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By ScotTi on Sep 27, 2017 1:30 PM, concerning plant: Billbergia (Billbergia pyramidalis 'Kyoto')

A 1975 Import into the US from Japan by Los Angeles nursery operator Jean Kerlin.
Japanese origin?

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