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By ILPARW on Nov 27, 2017 8:30 PM, concerning plant: Prairie Crabapple (Malus ioensis)

This species is native from central Texas thru eastern Oklahoma thru most of Missouri and Illinois, northwest Indiana, southern Wisconsin to southeast Minnesota. It was somewhat common once decades ago, but not now. Cedar Apple Rust from east Asia can be hard on native Crabapples and has lessened their numbers. The Oriental Crabapples have taken over in landscaping and in escaping cultivation. The Prairie Crab has larger fruits about 1.5 inches in diameter, even 2 inches, that turn yellow-green when mature while the oriental species have red or yellow smaller fruits. The flowers are large for crabapples and are white with pink or pink with white and bloom later in mid to late May. The leaves resemble those of Washington Hawthorn, being sort of three-lobed. It grows about 1.5 feet/year and lives about 50 to 100 years. Some native plant and specialty nurseries grow this species. The fruit has been used for jellies and jams.

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By ILPARW on Nov 27, 2017 7:49 PM, concerning plant: Yellowwood (Cladrastis kentukea)

A most lovely small to medium size tree in landscapes, but can get large in nature. Its native range is in northern Arkansas & southern Missouri to spots in Kentucky and Tennessee and just over the NC & VA borders. with or near forest in coves, ravines, river valleys, slopes, and ridges over streams. It grows about 1 to 2 feet/year and lives about 100 to 160 years. Its compound leaves have 7 to 11 rounded leaflets that turn yellow or golden in the fall. The slightly fragrant, white, pea-like flowers are borne in hanging spikes in late May to early June. It has smooth gray bark similar to beech. This wonderful tree is sold by some large diverse nurseries, native plant and specialty nurseries. It is not well known and is mostly planted by landscape designers and architects, so it is infrequently found.

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By ILPARW on Nov 27, 2017 7:19 PM, concerning plant: Fringe Tree (Chionanthus virginicus)

A most lovely small tree that can be a large shrub in the North. Native range from southern New Jersey and Pennsylvania down into central Florida to east Texas to southern Missouri to southern Ohio. The leaves are dark green and 4 to 8 inches long and to 4 inches wide with smooth or wavy margins. and turn yellow in the fall. The white flowers are in drooping pyramidal spikes about 4 to 8 inches long with new leaves in the May to early June range, blooming about 7 to 10 days and slightly fragrant. The female trees bear blue-black oval grape-like berries with each about 1 inch long. The bark is brown-gray and smooth a long time, eventually becoming more brown with thick flaky scales. In nature it is slow growing of about 4 to 6 inches/year growing in upland slopes and ravines, ledges, and ridges. In landscapes it can grow about 1 foot/year in the richer soil, and it lives over 100 years. It is offered by larger, diverse nurseries and by native plant and specialty nurseries. A wonderful plant that is infrequently planted, as most people don't know it. Most likely to be seen in professional landscapes by landscape architects.

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By ILPARW on Nov 26, 2017 9:21 PM, concerning plant: Common Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis)

The Common Hackberry is a nice, reliable shade tree that has a native range from a little of southeast Canada and New Hampshire down to central Tennessee to northern Oklahoma up to eastern North Dakota. It grows bout 1.5 to 2 feet/year and lives about 150 to 200 years. It is very adaptable to good or poor or heavy clay soils. This member of the Elm Family, and it looks elm-like, is sold at a good number of larger nurseries and native plant nurseries. It is wind-firm and really a clean tree. It has a good-looking gray bark that is sort of warty. Its elm-like leaves get to 4 inches long x 2 inches wide, the leaf margins are singly toothed, and the leaf apex is tapering and slightly curved, and leaves turn a good or poor yellow in fall. The species does develop some witches'-broom from a fungus and mite, but it is not serious, and neither is the nipple gall on the leaves. It is a common pioneer tree along with Green Ash and Boxelder. The little brownish-purple berries are loved by birds. It should be planted more than it is. There are several cultivars.

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By ILPARW on Nov 26, 2017 8:42 PM, concerning plant: Catalpa (Catalpa speciosa)

This large tropical-looking tree had a native range in the 1800's near the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers from northeast Arkansas to southern Indiana. Now it is all over the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic regions and other regions of the country as it was planted around some and escaped cultivation. It is fast growing of about 2 to 2.5 feet/year and lives about 100 years. It is upright in form and develops a big trunk. It develops a taproot or coarse lateral roots and can only be moved as a small tree in early spring. It can be a good large tree for large spaces as in parks, but it is not for small properties. It is also a powerful weed tree that sows itself everywhere, infesting urban areas in abandoned lots and grows with other pioneer trees as Boxelder, those trees that first colonize an open field. It is a very messy tree, dropping twigs, branches, flowers, and pods all over. It is weak-wooded and subject to storm damage. Most nurseries don't sell it.

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By ILPARW on Nov 26, 2017 7:48 PM, concerning plant: American Chestnut (Castanea dentata)

The American Chestnut was hit hard by the Chestnut Blight from east Asia back in the 1920's and about 99% or more died off, though there are sprouts that still come up from old tree stumps and grow for some years before the fungus kills them back down. A very few did survive, having natural resistance in various spots. These survivors are being propagated, and the American Chestnut Society has interbred the American species with the Chinese to now approaching trees that will be 15/16th American and will have resistance to the disease. Also it has been found that a gene from wheat inserted into chestnut cells gives resistance to the fungus by giving the tree an enzyme that breaks down the acid chemical from the fungus that causes damage. Therefore, the tree will be coming back in the near future. Some are being planted now. This species grows about 2 feet/year and lives over 200 years. Its native range is from Maine down to central Mississippi.

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By SunnyBorders on Nov 26, 2017 4:23 PM, concerning plant: Blue Lungwort (Pulmonaria angustifolia)

Horticultural Pulmonaria angustifolia is apparently not the same plant as Pulmonaria angustifolia Linnaeus. In addition, there is apparently confusion between the plant called P. angustifolia in horticulture and its cultivars.

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By ScotTi on Nov 26, 2017 5:34 AM, concerning plant: Bromeliad (Neoregelia 'Tangerine')

Two different Neoregelia cultivars share the N. 'Tangerine' name (hybrids by G. Anderson and G. Groves) The G. Groves hybrid is often sold as N. 'Groves Tangerine' to differentiate the two cultivars.

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By ScotTi on Nov 26, 2017 5:16 AM, concerning plant: Bromeliad (Neoregelia 'Groves's Tangerine')

A Grant Groves hybrid originally known as N. 'Tangerine', but is now referred to as N. 'Groves Tangerine' to differentiate from G. Anderson's N. 'Tangerine'.

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By ScotTi on Nov 26, 2017 4:20 AM, concerning plant: Bromeliad (Neoregelia 'Freddie')

C. Skotak advises that this cultivar is identical to N. 'Skotak's Orange Crush'. Skotak erroneously sold to Deleon's Bromeliad World, Miami FL by the 1000's (1995-1997) as N. 'Freddie'.

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By ScotTi on Nov 26, 2017 4:07 AM, concerning plant: Bromeliad (Neoregelia 'Skotak's Orange Crush')

As advised by C. Skotak this cultivar Skotak erroneously sold by the 1000's (1995- 1997) to Delon's Bromeliad World, Miami FL under the name Neorgelia 'Freddie'.

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By ILPARW on Nov 25, 2017 12:47 PM, concerning plant: Pecans (Carya illinoinensis)

I first saw this species grown in nut-producing orchards while driving in southern Alabama to and from Florida. Its native range is much of east Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma except the panhandle, much of Missouri, southern Illinois & Indiana, and along the Mississippi from the Gulf up to the south Wisconsin border and up the Illinois River into central Illinois, growing in bottomlands. It grows about 8 inches/year in nature and lives about 300 years. It needs moist soil. Its compound leaves get to 20 inches long and have 9 to 17 narrow leaflets with sharp teeth on margins. its bark stays smooth gray for a long time, but eventually develops furrowed bark with long, flat ridges. It develops the typical hickory deep taproot, but small trees can be moved in early spring B&B. There are quite a number of cultivars developed for nut production and are smaller, more compact, and grow faster.

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By ILPARW on Nov 25, 2017 12:01 PM, concerning plant: Pignut Hickory (Carya glabra)

I occasionally have seen this species, probably the third most common hickory in the North after the Shagbark and Bitternut Hickories. It is native from southern New England into central Florida to a little in east Texas up to much of Missouri and most all of Illinois to central Michigan. Its compound leaves get to 12 inches long and usually have 5 leaflets, but can have 7. The husk-nut fruit is about 1.3 inches long and is pear-shaped. The gray bark on mature trees is of scaly ridges that form a rough diamond-shaped pattern. It grows in dry and well-drained soils. It grows slowly as other hickories of about 6 -8 inches /year. It forms a deep taproot, but small trees can be moved B&B in early spring. It lives about 200 to 300 years.

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By ILPARW on Nov 25, 2017 11:34 AM, concerning plant: Shellbark Hickory (Carya laciniosa)

The Shellbark Hickory is similar to the much more common Shagbark Hickory, but it has larger leaves where the compound leaf is 15 to 22 inches long and it usually has 7 leaflets, (though 5 to 9 are possible). The nuts can be 4 or 6 ribbed instead of just 4-ribbed. The husk-nuts also have a slight narrow end, so they are not entirely round. The gray bark does not seem as shaggy as the Shaggy species. It is native to south of Lakes Ontario & Erie to south Michigan to central Illinois into Iowa and Missouri, then to the northern part of the South. It likes moist, fertile soils.

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By ILPARW on Nov 25, 2017 11:06 AM, concerning plant: Shagbark Hickory (Carya ovata)

The Shagbark hickory is the most common hickory in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic Regions. It name comes from its gray bark that has long scales curve far outward. Its compound leaves get to 14 inches long and have 5 leaflets, though up to 9 is possible. The fruit is a round, 4-ribbed husk to 2.5 inches in diameter with a sweet nut inside. Its native range is from a little bit of far southeast Canada to New England down to central Alabama to east Texas up to southeast Minnesota, thru central Wisconsin and lower Michigan. It is slow growing of about 6 -8 inches/year and lives about 200 to 250 years. It develops a deep taproot, but small trees can be moved B&B in spring. It is offered by some native plant and specialty nurseries.

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By ILPARW on Nov 25, 2017 10:46 AM, concerning plant: Mockernut (Carya alba)

This species gets its name from having a large fruit with a thick husk, but a relatively small nut inside. The nut is sweet, but hard to extract. This husk-nut is about 2 inches in diameter. borne in late summer into early Autumn. It is found mostly in much of the South or just above the South in drier soils. Native from southern New England to central Florida to east Texas up to southeast Iowa and central Illinois. Its compound leaves get to 12 inches long and have 7 to 9 leaflets that are soft hairy beneath. It is slow growing of about 6 to 8 inches/year and lives about 200 to 250 years. Some native plant and specialty nurseries offer it.

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By ILPARW on Nov 25, 2017 10:19 AM, concerning plant: Bitternut Hickory (Carya cordiformis)

I would say that the Bitternut Hickory is the second most common hickory species in the Midwest and parts of the Mid-Atlantic after the Shagbark. It is often near watercourses in moist or draining wet soils, but it can also be upland. Its native range is from a little bit of far southeast Canada and southern new England down to just over the northern Florida border to east Texas up to central Minnesota. Like other hickories it is slow growing of about 6 to 9 inches/year and lives about 200 years. It develops a deep taproot, but small trees can be moved B&B in spring. The leaves get to about 9 inches long and usually have 7 leaflets, but can have up to 11. The thin shelled 4-ribbed nut is bitter to eat and it is enclosed by a thin, yellowish husk, about 1 inch long. It is offered for sale by some native plant and specialty nurseries.

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By Australis on Nov 25, 2017 3:07 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Miltonidium Nova 'Medellin')

This particular clone is a hexaploid (6N).

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By Australis on Nov 25, 2017 2:46 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Oncidium cirrhosum 'Orquifollajes')

This clone is an example of the alba form of the species.

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By Australis on Nov 25, 2017 2:42 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Rhynchostele Bic-ross 'John')

This clone is a known tetraploid (4N).

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