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By ILPARW on Nov 25, 2017 11:34 AM, concerning plant: Shellbark Hickory (Carya laciniosa)

The Shellbark Hickory is similar to the much more common Shagbark Hickory, but it has larger leaves where the compound leaf is 15 to 22 inches long and it usually has 7 leaflets, (though 5 to 9 are possible). The nuts can be 4 or 6 ribbed instead of just 4-ribbed. The husk-nuts also have a slight narrow end, so they are not entirely round. The gray bark does not seem as shaggy as the Shaggy species. It is native to south of Lakes Ontario & Erie to south Michigan to central Illinois into Iowa and Missouri, then to the northern part of the South. It likes moist, fertile soils.

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By ILPARW on Nov 25, 2017 11:06 AM, concerning plant: Shagbark Hickory (Carya ovata)

The Shagbark hickory is the most common hickory in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic Regions. It name comes from its gray bark that has long scales curve far outward. Its compound leaves get to 14 inches long and have 5 leaflets, though up to 9 is possible. The fruit is a round, 4-ribbed husk to 2.5 inches in diameter with a sweet nut inside. Its native range is from a little bit of far southeast Canada to New England down to central Alabama to east Texas up to southeast Minnesota, thru central Wisconsin and lower Michigan. It is slow growing of about 6 -8 inches/year and lives about 200 to 250 years. It develops a deep taproot, but small trees can be moved B&B in spring. It is offered by some native plant and specialty nurseries.

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By ILPARW on Nov 25, 2017 10:46 AM, concerning plant: Mockernut (Carya alba)

This species gets its name from having a large fruit with a thick husk, but a relatively small nut inside. The nut is sweet, but hard to extract. This husk-nut is about 2 inches in diameter. borne in late summer into early Autumn. It is found mostly in much of the South or just above the South in drier soils. Native from southern New England to central Florida to east Texas up to southeast Iowa and central Illinois. Its compound leaves get to 12 inches long and have 7 to 9 leaflets that are soft hairy beneath. It is slow growing of about 6 to 8 inches/year and lives about 200 to 250 years. Some native plant and specialty nurseries offer it.

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By ILPARW on Nov 25, 2017 10:19 AM, concerning plant: Bitternut Hickory (Carya cordiformis)

I would say that the Bitternut Hickory is the second most common hickory species in the Midwest and parts of the Mid-Atlantic after the Shagbark. It is often near watercourses in moist or draining wet soils, but it can also be upland. Its native range is from a little bit of far southeast Canada and southern new England down to just over the northern Florida border to east Texas up to central Minnesota. Like other hickories it is slow growing of about 6 to 9 inches/year and lives about 200 years. It develops a deep taproot, but small trees can be moved B&B in spring. The leaves get to about 9 inches long and usually have 7 leaflets, but can have up to 11. The thin shelled 4-ribbed nut is bitter to eat and it is enclosed by a thin, yellowish husk, about 1 inch long. It is offered for sale by some native plant and specialty nurseries.

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By Australis on Nov 25, 2017 3:07 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Miltonidium Nova 'Medellin')

This particular clone is a hexaploid (6N).

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By Australis on Nov 25, 2017 2:46 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Oncidium cirrhosum 'Orquifollajes')

This clone is an example of the alba form of the species.

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By Australis on Nov 25, 2017 2:42 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Rhynchostele Bic-ross 'John')

This clone is a known tetraploid (4N).

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By Australis on Nov 25, 2017 1:58 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Joseph Schmidt 'Bert')

This is a known tetraploid (4N).

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By Australis on Nov 25, 2017 1:58 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Joseph Schmidt)

The hybridiser, Andy Easton, notes that this grex exists as both diploids and tetraploids.

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By Australis on Nov 24, 2017 11:27 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Janis Elaine Hoenig 'Salinas')

This is a tetraploid (4N) bred by Andy Easton. He notes it is an alba carrier.

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By ILPARW on Nov 24, 2017 8:29 PM, concerning plant: Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides)

A wonderful, beautiful native tree with a large native range covering most of all Canada, some of Alaska, the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada Mountains out West, New England down to northern New Jersey, northern Pennsylvania, spots in West Virginia, and around the Great Lakes. Fast growing of 2 to 4 feet/year and lives about 40 to 100 years, depending. It has a shallow, fibrous root system that can often cause more trees to sprout up from that system and make a colony. I knew of a landscaper from McKay Nursery in the 1970's in southern Wisconsin who planted sapling trees about 6 to 8 feet high bare root into northern Illinois landscapes. It is offered by some large, diverse nurseries, native plant nurseries, and mail order nurseries. The rounded leaves that quake in the breeze develop good to excellent golden fall color. Beautiful, smooth, tight, white to cream bark. The trunks of each tree is single and is not forming a clump of two or a few trunks like white birches do. The species can suffer some from humid and warm-hot conditions in more southern zones of 5 & 6 and be picked on by Hypoxylon canker and some leaf spots.

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By ILPARW on Nov 24, 2017 7:39 PM, concerning plant: Sea Myrtle (Baccharis halimifolia)

I've seen a good number of this nice native shrub in southeast Pennsylvania in some spots and more throughout Delaware in its sandy, acid soils. Good pollinator plant.

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By ILPARW on Nov 24, 2017 11:48 AM, concerning plant: Anglo Japanese Yew (Taxus 'Taunton')

I consider this to be the best cultivar of either Anglojapanese or Japanese Yews because it grows in a neat yet informal, natural form. This is not for any shearing at all, just some light pruning by hand pruners. It is not commonly used, but it is available at some larger, diverse nurseries. I bought six from Berthold Nursery in Elk Grove Village, IL in the 1990's and planted then around Whitespire Birch trees. D. Hill Nursery in Union, IL used to sell them too. This cultivar is very resistant to winter burn and to heat for a yew. The last time that I saw the yews I planted, they were still in good shape in 2015 and not ruined by what Dr. Michael Dirr referred to as "the worst landscape tool of all time, the hedge shears."

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By ILPARW on Nov 24, 2017 11:30 AM, concerning plant: Seaside Alder (Alnus maritima)

The Seaside Alder is a shrubby small tree or large shrub that grows in the wild in swamps, bottomlands, and along watercourses. It is found in the wild only in three areas: the variety of A, maritima maritima is found in spots in the Delmarva Penninsula; the A. maritima georgiensis is found in northwest Georgia, and the variety of A. maritima oklahomensis is found in two areas of Oklahoma. This species must have had a larger native range in times past, covering over all three recent areas. The glossy leaves are 2.5 to 4 inches long x 1.5 to 2 inches wide. The strobiles are about 1/2 inch long. It can grow in shallow standing water, but also tolerate dry, infertile soils. It is easy to grow from seed. There is a cultivar called "September Sun' that was developed at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa from the Oklahoma variety from the Blue River area that has a more regular form.

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By Australis on Nov 24, 2017 5:30 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Parish Cherry)

Andy Easton made this cross using the tetraploid Orchid (Cymbidium sanderae 'Emma Menninger'), making this one of the many grexes caught up in the Cym. parishii vs. Cym. sanderae mess.

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By ILPARW on Nov 23, 2017 9:55 PM, concerning plant: Black Alder (Alnus glutinosa)

Native to much of Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa. It has escaped cultivation in eastern North America in some areas and has spread along watercourses and ponds, as I have seen them in northeast Illinois, southeast Pennsylvania, and Delaware. It is sold by some larger diverse nurseries and makes a good-looking, adaptable landscape tree. Fast growing of about 2 to 2.5 feet/year.

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By ILPARW on Nov 23, 2017 9:22 PM, concerning plant: Speckled Alder (Alnus rugosa)

The Speckled Alder is native to much of Canada, New England, New York, northern and western Pennsylvania, West Virginia, northern Ohio, much of Michigan, Wisconsin, and north and east Minnesota in swamps, bottomlands, lake margins, and along water courses. It is fast growing of about 2 to 3 feet/year and lives around 40 years. It is recognized by having white lenticels on the stems and the leaves have big doubly serrate teeth. It is sold by some native plant nurseries for naturalistic landscaping in wet soils. I think it makes a nice birch-like shrub that is smooth and clean.

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By ILPARW on Nov 23, 2017 8:57 PM, concerning plant: Smooth Alder (Alnus serrulata)

The Smooth Alder is an abundant shrub in southeast Pennsylvania in wet soil near ponds and watercourses. It is native from Maine to northern Florida and then to east Texas and up to southern Illinois along the Mississippi . It can range from 6 feet to 30 feet high, but usually is about 10 to 20 feet high. It is very similar to the Speckled Alder, but the leaves are widest just above the middle of the leaf, the leaf margins have small, fine teeth that are regular in formation, and it does not have the white or orange wart-like lenticels on the stems. It is fast growing of about 2 to 3 feet/year and lives about 40 years. It likes moist to draining wet soil that is about pH 6 to 7. I did see the Delaware Native Plant Society selling some of this species in pots and other native plant nurseries do offer this; not in conventional nurseries. I think it is a nice native shrub that is sort of birch-like, smooth, and clean. it is listed as being high in wildlife value by Gary Highshoe in his book of "Native Trees, Shrubs, and Vines."

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By ILPARW on Nov 22, 2017 9:10 PM, concerning plant: Japanese Larch (Larix kaempferi)

Japanese Larch is a beautiful conifer tree. Its foliage is bluish-green, with needles about 1 to 1.5 inches long and a little wider than the European's, and whorled on spurs with 40 or more needles on each spur. The 1 to 1.5 inch long cones have reflexed edges; that is, the scale edges roll back. The bark is supposed to be more interesting than the European's. A few large, diverse nurseries offer this species. I've only seen it twice, once in Illinois and once in Pennsylvania.

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By ILPARW on Nov 22, 2017 8:46 PM, concerning plant: European Larch (Larix decidua)

The European Larch is occasionally planted in the landscapes of the Midwest, Northeast, and Mid-Atlantic of the US in parks, on estates, and in wealthy neighborhoods, and is offered at larger, diverse nurseries. It is a good, reliable tree that is more adapted to landscapes than the American species, but the latter makes a fine tree too and is native to the region. (Native species tend to be more useful to native birds, insects, and wildlife.) It is fast growing of about 2 feet/year and lives over 150 years. The European species has curved needles about 1/2 to 1.5 inches long and about 30 to 40 whorled on each spur. It has a lot of small cones about 1 to 1.5 inches long.

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