Viewing comments posted by csandt

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[ Dichondra (Dichondra argentea Silver Falls™) | Posted on August 13, 2019 ]

This is a fabulous plant that cascades over rocks and adds contrasting light blue green foliage to my sunny hillside garden. A single tiny plant from a small pot has grown to occupy a space about four by three feet over the three months it has been growing in my garden.

[ Butterfly Bush (Buddleja 'Wisteria Lane') | Posted on July 28, 2019 ]

I bought one Butterfly Bush (Buddleja 'Wisteria Lane') because I could not find Butterfly Bush (Buddleja Buzz™ Sky Blue) in the spring of 2019. In previous springs, it was readily available, so I am curious as to why it disappeared in 2019. I used to have many Buzz Sky Blue plants at the small farm where I used to live until about four months ago. I loved this cultivar because of its lovely intensely blue flowers, its relatively small size, its tendency not to produce seedlings, and its strong attraction for butterflies.

Butterfly Bush (Buddleja 'Wisteria Lane') Is very disappointing. Its flower color is an unattractive washed-out light blue; also the plant sprawls too much and is much too flat to be attractive.

[ Multiflora Spreading/Trailing Petunia (Petunia Supertunia® Vista Bubblegum) | Posted on July 27, 2019 ]

Multiflora Spreading/Trailing Petunia (Petunia Supertunia® Vista Bubblegum) Is AMAZING! I have seven interspersed among the numerous other plants in my sunny hillside garden. Each Bubblegum plant has been blooming non-stop for two and a half months (mid-May through late July) and has formed a large, floriferous mound (36" x 48" or larger). According to a knowledgeable Amish greenhouse owner near my home, Bubblegum is the most floriferous of the Supertunias—in a class by itself. My experience with Bubblegum confirms that description. For color and impact, it is stunning.

[ Impatiens SunPatiens® Compact Blush Pink | Posted on July 27, 2019 ]

Impatiens SunPatiens® Compact Blush Pink grows both in shade and in part sun in my garden and is lovely in both spots. Its color transitions from a deep and vibrant pink to pale pink as the flowers age, and this adds interest. Each plant has formed a large, attractive mound, has been blooming non-stop for two and a half months (mid May through late July) and shows no signs of slowing down anytime soon. Osmocote in the hole at planting time was the only fertilized I have used.

[ Impatiens SunPatiens® Compact Royal Magenta | Posted on July 27, 2019 ]

Impatiens SunPatiens® Compact Royal Magenta Is a star in my shade garden. Its flowers are a deep, saturated magenta, and the leaves are untouched by disease and hungry insects. I also have it growing in a sunny spot next to the door to my glass porch, but here it is less striking because the flowers tend to develop unsightly white spots as they age. Farther away in the landscape, this would not be as noticeable. In both shade and sun, the plants are very floriferous and nicely mound-shaped. They have been blooming non-stop for two and a half months so far (Mid-May through late July) and are not showing any signs of slowing down anytime soon. When I planted them, I put Osmocote slow-release fertilizer in the hole.

[ New Guinea Impatiens (Impatiens hawkeri Divine™ Pink) | Posted on July 27, 2019 ]

New Guinea Impatiens (Impatiens hawkeri Divine™ Pink) has not been particularly floriferous in its shady spot in my garden. Compared to the three cultivars of SunPatiens growing nearby (Compact Blush Pink, Compact Pink, and Compact Royal Magenta), Divine Pink is disappointing.

[ Hosta 'Paul's Glory' | Posted on June 5, 2019 ]

In zone 6B, Paul's Glory is a beautiful and reliable hosta in shade or part sun, but it burns when grown in too sunny a location.

[ German Garlic (Allium senescens 'Blue Eddy') | Posted on November 29, 2018 ]

Allium senescens Blue Eddy was featured in the November/December 2018 issue of "Horticulture" magazine in a full-column section of the article "Plamts We Love." This cultivar was bred by NGA member and allium expert Mark McDonough, @AntMan01, who also bred Allium Millenium, Perennial Plant of the Year for 2018, and a favorite of mine.

[ Ornamental Onion (Allium 'Millenium') | Posted on July 13, 2018 ]

Allium Millenium is featured in a list of the top ten perennials recommended for 2018:

http://www.perennials.com/cont...

[ Siberian Iris (Iris 'Gull's Wing') | Posted on June 1, 2018 ]

Poor performer in my garden. Clump has shrunk over the years.

[ Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Third Witch') | Posted on October 5, 2017 ]

In its first season in my garden, Third Witch bloomed from June 26 through August 14. It is lovely, especially planted near yellow-green daylilies that complement its green throat.

[ Crape Myrtle (Lagerstroemia 'Muskogee') | Posted on July 31, 2017 ]

Muskogee has proved to be a fast-growing and tough tree in my zone 6b windy hilltop garden. Newly planted in fall, 2014, Muskogee survived the unusually cold 2014-2015 winter with ease, in contrast to crape myrtle cultivars Hopi, which died, and Velour, which is usually a winter survivor here but which died to the ground that winter. Muskogee is a very pretty tree, with its lovely light pink/purple flowers. I have five Muskogee crape myrtles, and all are doing very well.

[ Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Regal Finale') | Posted on July 28, 2017 ]

I planted three double fans of Regal Finale in early September 2016. I obtained the plants from Sterrett Gardens, Craddockville Virginia. Each original double fan produced three scapes during its first season of bloom (2017), and the flowers were beautiful, with a velvet-like texture, stunning deep wine color, and gorgeous green throat. I chose Regal Finale because of its lovely appearance, because it blooms somewhat late, and because it was hybridized by Patrick Stamile. I became a fan of Patrick Stamile because of other cultivars that have always performed very well in my garden: Strawberry Candy and Ruby Spider. I am very pleased with Regal Finale!

[ Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Royal Occasion') | Posted on July 19, 2017 ]

This is an amazing cultivar for its prolific blooms. Six-way branching on strong scapes produces lots of blooms held above the foliage. Blooms are heavy substance.

[ Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Royal Occasion') | Posted on July 13, 2017 ]

I have had Royal Occasion for one year (planted July, 2016), and I am very pleased with its performance in my zone 6b garden. It has six-way branching on some scapes and five-way branching on others, and the blooms are lovely. It has already produced a very nice clump.

[ Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Red Hot Returns') | Posted on July 13, 2017 ]

I have had Red Hot Returns for about ten years, and I am very disappointed with it. It has not rebloomed, and it has not formed clumps in my zone 6b garden.

[ Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Fooled Me') | Posted on July 13, 2017 ]

Fooled me is a stunning, eye-catching bright light in my zone 6b garden, even without supplemental water. It makes a nice clump, and the flowers always bloom way above the foliage. I could not be happier with its performance.

[ Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Royal Celebration') | Posted on June 27, 2017 ]

I have 84 different daylily cultivars in my garden, most represented by multiple clumps, and Royal Celebration is the only one that has not done well. When it formed flower buds, they started out as unusually small structures and then shrank into deformed shapes and dried up. Finally, the entire spike dried up. Photographs can be seen here:

The thread "Royal Celebration: Need advice" in Daylilies forum

I was very confused as to what was going on with my plants, so I asked the daylily experts at garden.org. I learned from their responses that there is a genetic defect in Royal Celebration that causes stunted buds. Several people who tried to grow it reported getting rid of it because of their experience with its stunted buds.

I wonder how Royal Celebration could have won an Honorable Mention award from the American Hemerocallis Society when it has these problems.

[ Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Miss Amelia') | Posted on June 22, 2017 ]

Year after year, Miss Amelia holds its own, blooms reliably, and increases its clump size competing with the roots of a water-greedy red maple.

[ Forest Cabbage Tree (Cordyline banksii Electric Pink™) | Posted on June 19, 2017 ]

This cultivar performed very poorly for me and eventually died.

I purchased three plants in late winter, 2017, and maintained them as house plants until spring. My goal was to use them as spikes (thrillers) in outdoor pots once spring arrived. By spring, two plants were dead, and the third appeared viable but not robust, so I planted that one in a pot with a Coleus, Petrosedum rupestre subsp. Rupestre 'Angelina' and New Guinea Impatiens (Impatiens hawkerii 'Tamarinda Purple Bicolor'). The Cordyline banksii Electric Pink then died as the two other plants of this cultivar had done. The other plants in the pot are doing fine.

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