Viewing comments posted to the Roses Database

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Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Mr. Bluebird') on September 24, RoseBlush1 wrote:

Interesting fact about the registration and marketing of 'Mr. Bluebird' ...

When Ralph Moore introduced this rose in 1960, miniature roses were in fashion, so he registered it as a miniature rose even though it is a china rose. He used the miniature classification because he said, "No one is interested in buying a china rose".

In some rose literature, it is a cross of Old Blush (a china) x Old Blush. Ralph has said it is a self seedling of Old Blush. Since the pollen parent is uncertain, standard practice is to say it was open pollenated.

Like many chinas, it does need to be pruned lightly in spring for a more prolific bloom.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'White Delight') on September 20, RoseBlush1 wrote:

I have found 'White Delight' to be a prolific bloomer in my garden in the mountains of northern California. In the summer, my climate has low humidity and high temperatures. 'White Delight', growing own root, is a strong, healthy plant. I don't think I could ask for a better garden rose.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Penny Lane') on September 11, Steve812 wrote:

By one measure Penny Lane is a very rare hybrid tea rose (judging from its flowers at peak form) that actually grows in my garden on its own roots. This puts it solidly in the top ten percent of HT roses I have attempted in the mountains of Arizona. So it has vigorous roots, it survives dozens of late spring freezes, and it grows well enough in summers with coolish nighttime temperatures. I've observed no fungal infections, and its blossoms, though fragrant, do not seem to be overly affected by thrips. This said, it is not the most vigorous rose in my garden where it grows on poor soil, gets by on meager rations of water, and competes with the damask rose Nouveau Monde. In about four or five growing seasons its one cane has reached chest height. This is a very convenient height for photographing roses, but not a very generous height for a climber.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Claire Austin') on September 10, Steve812 wrote:

Growing in about five years to four and a half feet tall and about as wide, Claire Austin produces flowers about the size and shape of a smallish tangerine. The blossoms start out a pale lemon sherbet yellow that fairly quickly fades to white. Compared to, say, Rainbow Sorbet, the plant seems a little spare with its blossoms - both the number on the plant at once and the frequency with which they are borne through the year. On close inspection, I find that there is a special quality to them, a delicacy that is almost heart-rendingly beautiful. The plant is not so densely branched as a polyantha, but it is well branched enough to look good standing alone in the garden without lots of knee-high plants around it. It has a lovely open shrubby apearance.
As did Charlotte and The Poet's Wife, this rose developed some leaf yellowing that I presumed to be chlorosis in its early years. The problem killed Charlotte and TPW, but this season - with nothing but some foliar sprays that included a bit of iron - Claire Austin's leaves turned a darker shade of grassy green. Fans of really dark rose foliage tinged with gray, purple, or blue may be a little disappointed in the leaves, but the grassy green works pretty well with the flowers. I've observed no disease problems on Claire Austin. I suspect it might be happier in my zip code if it had a few hours of PM shade. I've been pleasantly surprised that the thrips aren't very drawn to the flowers. As of this writing, I cannot report detecting any remarkable fragrance.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Tess of the d'Urbervilles') on September 10, Steve812 wrote:

Tess of the d'Urbervilles is a plant that will almost never wow. It builds up slowly but inevitably to about six feet high and about eight feet across. The process can take seven years. During this time it is rarely troubled by insects or diseases. It doles out flowers during the growing season in a somewhat parsimonious manner, but they are always subtly lovely. The color is a magenta-tinged dark red, almost always lovely (at least in coolish summer areas where the petals do not dry out), but rarely stunning. It's a rose I cannot imagine doing without in the garden, but any garden that would depend solely on it for color would be a very somber one, indeed.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Selfridges') on September 10, Steve812 wrote:

I simply cannot stop taking photos of this rose. Part of the reason is that there are few moments during the growing season when it is not in bloom. Another is that I love the gently scrolling petals and the way they shine against the glossy green foliage. The plant itself grows with a vigor no HT rose I have planted here in the mountains of AZ can match. It actually needs a tiny bit of light shade to keep its roots from drying out too quickly. Old leaves can sometimes show some blackspot, otherwise, no observed disease problems. Not sure it would make a good cutting rose, but it surely does add nearly continual interest to the warm season garden.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Portlandia') on September 10, Steve812 wrote:

It is a rare rose bred after 1900 that can grow on its own roots, even if it is not being transplanted over and over. I bought Portlandia as a band from Heirloom Roses three years ago and I moved it last year. Despite the fact that it is growing on its own roots, that it grows in miserably thin soil, and that it keeps getting dug up and moved, each year it just gets bigger and better. One might wish for a bit more delicacy in the beauty of its blossoms; but in terms of vigor and disease resistance, this is a highly serviceable rose, capable of bringing color and interest to a garden without being finicky.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Hermosa') on August 31, Steve812 wrote:

In my own garden (procured ca. 2011 from Antique Rose Emporium) it is a chest-high plant , very nicely branched and about four or five feet across. The foliage has a subtle but distinct bluish cast and the flower's shade of pink is distinctly on the lavender side. This, IMO, augments the look of the flower. It is one of the prettiest roses I grow in terms of flower form, with its petals reflexing nicely as the best tea roses do. It is among the more generous in terms of flower production. And it has pretty good disease resistance. During wet/humid summers old leaves can get blackspot; but I have not yet seen new growth imperiled by the blight. It seems to be happy enough here in the mountains of AZ with four or five hours of midday shade.

Because of its size, I simply cannot imagine growing more than three of these next to each other any more than I can imagine calling Sissinghurst Castle and all its associated grounds my home and domain.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Mathilda') on June 21, sandnsea2 wrote:

This is a wonderful , compact, long blooming rose. It is a workhorse in my garden. I purchased 4 plants last Fall and they bloomed till frost. The color is a good blender for a mixed garden bed or border. A very useful rose.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Day Breaker') on June 3, Paul2032 wrote:

Day Breaker is a vigorous healthy rose here and I haven't had any cultural problems with it. The bush covers itself with nicely formed blossoms that age well. It grows quite large. I bought my mother one of these because the hybridizer is Fryer from England and that is my mom's maiden name. I would highly recommend this rose. A favorite. It is being carried by a local nursery and has been for years. It must sell well, An award winner in England.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Munstead Wood') on April 30, Yorkshirelass wrote:

This rose may sometimes bloom with paler flowers during its second flush. Advice from David Austin Roses is that the colour can be variable when the petals are thin.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Golden Glow') on March 29, gwbuck wrote:

This rose has been in our yard since before we moved in. It's probably at least 5 years old (if not decades) and has done pretty well, despite being neglected. It needs very little pruning if you are looking for a tall rose that's capable of climbing. Cold hardy, too; Laramie winters haven't killed it yet. I'm excited to see what it does this summer since we've been caring for it.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Baby Blanket') on February 13, GardenQuilts wrote:

I have grown this rose for several years. I like it, but it wasn't what I expected. It sends lots of long, thin, prickly canes that take off in all directions rooting wherever they touch ground. The longest canes were 8-12'.

I have moved three times in the past 4 years. Baby Blanket and its progeny have survived. I am going to try growing them as climbers against a chain link fence - I hate chain link fences, so I am covering them in flowering vines.

I will hopefully return with beautiful pictures later this season.

I have seen 'Baby Blanket' sold as a standard. It would be a beautiful, weeping, flowering standard rose.
Talking about Rose (Rosa carolina subsp. carolina) on February 13, GardenQuilts wrote:

I bought this rose from Lowe's. It was in the "native plants" section in a pale green plastic pot, not the rose section. It is growing on its own roots "au naturel", of course. (I am not a fan of "branding" roses and putting them in matching plastic pots, but happy to see roses other than knockouts for sale)

I planted it late in the season then dug it up the next season. It is in a pot waiting to be planted in my new garden. It hasn't bloomed, yet, but it is setting buds.

This year has been a warmer than average winter. My potted relocated roses appreciate it, but I worry about spring frosts.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Crown Princess Margareta') on January 18, GardenQuilts wrote:

This rose is my last remaining Austin rose after three moves, the worst winter in recent memory as a newly transplanted rose, and the Bambi brigade.

I hope she thrives in my new cottage garden -- in my mind's eye it is a cottage garden; in reality, it is a plant ghetto plunked in a mess of muddy clay.

She is beautiful when she is happy and tougher than she looks!
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Campfire') on January 6, RIrose wrote:

Campfire is a great rose. Its blooms change color as they mature, which creates a harlequin effect on the bush. I've had it for 2 years and in its 2nd season it has a spreading habit, but doesn't get too tall. It is winter hardy to Zone 2-3 and disease resistant. A great rose.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'American Pillar') on November 21, AndreA33 wrote:

This is a triploid rose. Seeds of triploid plants may give 90% weak seedlings, but 10% will be very vigorous and interesting ones, so I will try to sow lots of seeds of it this winter.
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Konrad Adenauer') on November 14, Lisaevo wrote:

I have a Konrad Adenauer hybrid tea rose and it throws what would almost be climbing canes in the fall, very similar to Folklore. According to the breeder, Tantau, it is a short rose, but in my Zone 6b, it is easily 5' tall during most of the season, with canes that are 10-12' long after the middle of September.

Is this common or is my rose a genetic outlier?
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Wedding Bells') on October 31, csandt wrote:

I planted 'Wedding Bells' grafted to Multiflora rose stock from Palatine Roses in early spring, 2016. It produced beautiful blooms in June, but as the summer heat increased, bloom quality declined (e.g., ugly brown edges on the petals). As cooler fall weather settled in, the blooms became beautiful once again. I was never able to detect any fragrance; nor could any visitors to my garden. This observation differs from the description of this cultivar found here: http://newflora.com/product/we.... Based on one season in my zone 6b Pennsylvania garden, it seems that 'Wedding Bells' is stressed by hot summer temperatures and very happy in cooler weather .
Talking about Rose (Rosa 'Beverly') on October 31, csandt wrote:

I planted 'Beverly' grafted to Multiflora rose stock from Palatine Roses in early spring, 2016. It produced beautiful, wonderfully fragrant blooms in June. As the summer heat increased, bloom quality declined (e.g., ugly brown edges on the petals), although the fabulous fragrance never faltered. As cooler fall weather settled in, the blooms became beautiful once again. So based on one season, it seems that 'Beverly' is stressed by hot summer temperatures and very happy in cooler weather in my zone 6b Pennsylvania garden.

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