Black Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa 'Viking')

Botanical names:
Aronia melanocarpa Accepted
Photinia melanocarpa Synonym

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Shrub
Life cycle: Perennial
Sun Requirements: Full Sun to Partial Shade
Water Preferences: Mesic
Soil pH Preferences: Slightly acid (6.1 – 6.5)
Minimum cold hardiness: Zone 3 -40 °C (-40 °F) to -37.2 °C (-35)
Maximum recommended zone: Zone 9b
Plant Height: 3-5 feet
Plant Spread: 5 feet (Spreading by suckers, not invasive)
Leaves: Good fall color
Unusual foliage color
Deciduous
Other: Glossy summer foliage and gorgeous red fall foliage.
Fruit: Showy
Edible to birds
Other: Extra-large 3/4", persistent purplish black berries (used like currants) often lasting 'til Spring
Fruiting Time: Late summer or early fall
Fall
Flowers: Showy
Fragrant
Flower Color: White
Bloom Size: Under 1"
Flower Time: Spring
Other: April
Suitable Locations: Xeriscapic
Uses: Windbreak or Hedge
Provides winter interest
Suitable for forage
Edible Parts: Fruit
Eating Methods: Raw
Cooked
Wildlife Attractant: Bees
Birds
Resistances: Deer Resistant
Propagation: Other methods: Stolons and runners

Image

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Comments:
Posted by ILPARW (southeast Pennsylvania - Zone 6b) on Dec 3, 2017 8:29 PM

"Viking' is the most commonly planted cultivar for fruit production, then 'Nero' is the second. The specimen I planted in a house foundation bears the fruit heavily so it can bend down the branches. The fruit tastes a little better than the regular Black Chokeberry shrubs, being a little less tart. I like them raw or especially in pancakes. A number of companies sell jams, jellies, and juices from the berries. Even common juice blends often have a little of this juice in them if one reads the label.

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Discussion Threads about this plant
Thread Title Last Reply Replies
Overgrown shrub ID? by Lmvantassel May 25, 2017 9:27 PM 7

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