Kansas Hawthorn (Crataegus coccinioides)

Also sold as:
Crataegus coccinoides

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Tree
Sun Requirements: Full Sun
Water Preferences: Mesic
Soil pH Preferences: Slightly acid (6.1 – 6.5)
Neutral (6.6 – 7.3)
Slightly alkaline (7.4 – 7.8)
Moderately alkaline (7.9 – 8.4)
Minimum cold hardiness: Zone 5a -28.9 °C (-20 °F) to -26.1 °C (-15 °F)
Maximum recommended zone: Zone 7b
Plant Height: 15 to 30 feet
Plant Spread: 20 to 35 feet
Leaves: Good fall color
Deciduous
Fruit: Showy
Edible to birds
Fruiting Time: Late summer or early fall
Flowers: Showy
Malodorous
Flower Color: White
Flower Time: Spring
Wildlife Attractant: Bees
Birds
Resistances: Pollution
Drought tolerant
Pollinators: Bees
Various insects
Miscellaneous: Tolerates poor soil
Thorned
Monoecious

close-up of leaves and fruit

Photo gallery:
Location: Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IllinoisDate: 2017-09-05close-up of leaves and fruit
By ILPARW
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Location: Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IllinoisDate: 2017-09-05full-grown tree in Midwest Collection
By ILPARW
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Location: Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IllinoisDate: 2017-09-05looking at trunk
By ILPARW
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Location: Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IllinoisDate: 2017-09-05fruit and foliage
By ILPARW
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Comments:
Posted by ILPARW (southeast Pennsylvania - Zone 6b) on Jan 1, 2018 7:38 PM

I was wandering about in the Northern Illinois and Midwest Collections on the east side of Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Illinois and I came upon this tree (L-58/65-90) labeled the Kansas Hawthorn. It has been noted as having larger leaves and fruit than most other hawthorns. It is very similar to the more well-known Scarlet Hawthorn, Crataegus coccinea. This species is noted as growing wild in dry hillsides, especially those where the parent rock is limestone. There is confusion about the native range of this species. Morton Arboretum says it is native from Indiana to Kansas. NRCS says it is native to Iowa and Missouri & southern Illinois to eastern Kansas and Arkansas. Another source of Go Botany in New England includes a little of southern Ontario & Quebec, New England, New York, and New Jersey into the mix.

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