The Main Plant entry for Rain Lilies (Zephyranthes)

This database entry exists to show plant data and photos that apply generically to all Rain Lilies.

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Herb/Forb
Life cycle: Perennial
Flowers: Showy
Other: Blooms are stimulated and flower best when triggered by rainfall
Underground structures: Bulb
Uses: Groundcover
Cut Flower
Will Naturalize
Wildlife Attractant: Bees
Butterflies
Propagation: Seeds: Days to germinate: 2 to 4 weeks
Depth to plant seed: 1/8 inch
Can handle transplanting
Other info: Collect shiny black seeds from capsules when yellow and beginning to split. Viability decreases rapidly after harvest; sow fresh seeds on moist potting soil and add enough media on top to cover. Press gently. Place in indirect light and keep moist.
Propagation: Other methods: Division
Bulbs
Containers: Suitable in 1 gallon
Suitable in 3 gallon or larger

Image
Common names
  • Rain lily

This plant is tagged in:
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Comments:
  • Posted by Marilyn (Kentucky - Zone 6a) on May 21, 2013 12:09 AM concerning plant:
    "Currently these plants are commonly cultivated in USDA hardiness zones 7–10. Rain lily breeders may develop cultivars with greater cold hardness.

    Generally rain lilies are sold in nurseries already potted up. This is of benefit since the growth cycle is not interrupted. Rarely (and not ideally), dried bulbs are marketed. Such dried bulbs usually become established after one to two growing seasons and will regain bloom vigor.

    Although many of the common names include "lily", these plants are actually in the Amaryllis family. They are much less fussy than the amaryllis however. Zephyranthes are bulbs, but you don't have to fuss over them like tulips. You usually buy them in one gallon pots with ample soil around them. They come out of the pot in a big clump of 30 or so bulbs and you can simply plant the entire clump intact or separate them and spread them out a little.

    Zephyranthes are available year round in most nurseries in USDA Zones 7–10. While the pink species is best known, coral, white, and yellow species are gaining popularity. If you plant Zephyranthes when it is cool, give them some water as they get established, then you never need to mess with them again. Just enjoy them. No watering, no pruning, no muss, no fuss.

    While Zephyranthes can stand dry periods, if you want the graceful green leaves to remain showing all year, you may need to add some water in drier periods or more arid climates. This can be a good thing if you let them dry a week or so between watering. The cycle of drying then watering encourages them to send forth bewitching flowers.

    All Zephyranthes do best with a little shade in the US Southwest. If you plant them around the base of trees or shrubs, everyone wins. You get a ground cover that shades the ground so your trees lose less water to evaporation, and zephyranthes get some shade. The cover of zephyranthes hides fallen leaves, which turn into nutrient rich compost for continued plant health, and you have less raking."

    Taken from wikipedia's page at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z...

  • Posted by SongofJoy (Clarksville, TN - Zone 6b) on Jan 11, 2012 9:54 AM concerning plant:
    Zephyranthes are available year round in most nurseries in USDA Zones 7–10. While the pink species is best known, coral, white, and yellow species are also available.

    If you plant Zephyranthes when it is cool, give them some water as they get established and then stop.

    All Zephyranthes do best with a little shade in hot, arid climates such as the US Southwest and are good planted at the base of trees in those locations. Zephyranthes can stand dry periods, but if you want the green leaves to remain showing all year, water in drier periods or more arid climates. Let them dry a week or so between watering. The cycle of drying then watering encourages them to flower.
  • Posted by Friesfan1 (NW, KS - Zone 5b) on Sep 25, 2019 1:11 PM concerning plant:
    It would be nice if the zones for Rain Lily were part of the description.
    I find from a google search they are perennial in zones 7-11.

    Friesfan1
    Gardener in zone 5b.
Plant Events from our members
piksihk On May 14, 2020 Bloomed
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piksihk On January 9, 2020 Bloomed
one pink bloom front of daylily bed
piksihk On September 19, 2019 Bloomed
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piksihk On May 7, 2019 Bloomed
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piksihk On August 10, 2018 Bloomed
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piksihk On July 30, 2018 Seeds germinated
White with pink edges - WG frt bed
piksihk On May 23, 2018 Bloomed
HW and WG frt bed
piksihk On August 31, 2017 Bloomed
piksihk On July 20, 2017 Bloomed
White and pink
piksihk On May 27, 2016 Bloomed
Pink in HW bed front of irises
piksihk On May 19, 2016 Bloomed
Front bed WG; white edged in pink
piksihk On March 27, 2016 Bloomed
transplanted to HW with daylilies - pink ones
piksihk On August 26, 2015 Bloomed
rect. bed
SuperHappyCamper On February 10, 2022 Obtained plant
Purchased from HD.
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