Spider Flower (Tarenaya hassleriana)

Common names:
Give a thumbs up Spider Flower
Give a thumbs up Grandfather's Whiskers
Give a thumbs up Spider Legs

Botanical names:
Tarenaya hassleriana Accepted
Cleome hassleriana Synonym

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Herb/Forb
Life cycle: Annual
Sun Requirements: Full Sun
Water Preferences: Mesic
Dry Mesic
Dry
Plant Height: 36-48 inches
Plant Spread: 18-24 inches
Leaves: Fragrant
Other: Plant has spines
Fruit: Dehiscent
Flowers: Showy
Fragrant
Flower Color: Lavender
Pink
White
Flower Time: Late spring or early summer
Summer
Late summer or early fall
Fall
Uses: Cut Flower
Will Naturalize
Wildlife Attractant: Bees
Birds
Butterflies
Hummingbirds
Resistances: Drought tolerant
Propagation: Seeds: Stratify seeds: if starting indoors
Sow in situ
Miscellaneous: With thorns/spines/prickles/teeth

Great plant for adding a bit of height in a cottage garden.

This plant is tagged in:
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Comments:
Posted by robertduval14 (Mason, New Hampshire - Zone 5b) on Mar 7, 2013 9:10 PM

I find them very pretty, but a bit invasive. If you need to pull unwanted volunteers, I would suggest you wear gloves. They are quite the thorny little suckers.

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Posted by krobra (Woodbridge , Va - Zone 7a) on Jun 23, 2017 1:44 AM

Spider Flower (Tarenaya hassleriana) is a butterfly host plant for the Great Southern White, Cabbage White, and Checkered White butterflies.

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Posted by Catmint20906 (Maryland - Zone 7a) on Aug 27, 2014 8:23 PM

Spider Flower (Tarenaya hassleriana) grew in my garden two years ago as a volunteer. The profuse blooms were very attractive, and the two volunteer plants grew to over 5 feet high. Unfortunately, the taller and wider around they got, the more difficult it became to remove their many, constantly multiplying seed pods. Each flower head would sprout a dozen or so seed pods, and each pod contained about a zillion seeds. Removing the pods was complicated by the fact that Cleome (at least the Cleome that volunteered in my garden) can be quite thorny. The wider the two plants got, the harder it was to reach into the foliage to get all the seed pods without getting stuck in the arms and chest by thorns. At the end of the season, I donned gloves and took my loppers, chopped both the plants down at their trunk-like bases, and dragged them to the trash on plastic. Last year I found a couple more growing as volunteers, and I removed them while they were still babies, fearing the thorns. This year, however, I let one of the volunteers grow and it has pleasantly surprised me by being considerably less thorny. In its less thorny state, I have been enjoying it.

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Discussion Threads about this plant
Thread Title Last Reply Replies
Plant ID?? by jonnyink Sep 2, 2017 9:07 AM 2
What is this flower? by willow61 Aug 21, 2017 4:12 PM 4
Lupin like leaves, no flower vertical stem by Carlosfed Aug 19, 2017 3:04 PM 2
flower ID by bareroot Aug 13, 2017 4:23 AM 2
This sprouted in a pot that originated from Glasshouse Works. by kkaymci55 Aug 6, 2017 2:35 PM 6

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