Meadow evening-primrose (Oenothera pilosella) in the Oenotheras Database

Common names:
Give a thumbs up Meadow evening-primrose
Give a thumbs up Evening Primrose

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Herb/Forb
Life cycle: Perennial
Sun Requirements: Full Sun
Full Sun to Partial Shade
Water Preferences: Wet Mesic
Mesic
Dry Mesic
Soil pH Preferences: Slightly acid (6.1 – 6.5)
Minimum cold hardiness: Zone 3 -40 °C (-40 °F) to -37.2 °C (-35)
Maximum recommended zone: Zone 8b
Plant Height: 12 to 24 inches
Plant Spread: 12 to 24 inches, spreads forming dense colonies.
Fruit: Other: Elliptical (oval) shaped capsule, tapering towards base. When mature the capsule splits, releasing numerous seeds which are dispersed with the wind.
Flowers: Showy
Fragrant
Flower Color: Yellow
Bloom Size: 1"-2"
Flower Time: Late spring or early summer
Summer
Underground structures: Rhizome
Uses: Groundcover
Will Naturalize
Wildlife Attractant: Bees
Butterflies
Pollinators: Moths and Butterflies
Bees
Miscellaneous: Goes Dormant

a patch in bloom

Photo gallery:
Location: Jenkins Arboretum in Berwyn, PennsylvaniaDate: 2019-06-09a patch in bloom
By ILPARW
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Location: Jenkins Arboretum in Berwyn, PennsylvaniaDate: 2019-06-09close-up of flowers
By ILPARW
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Location: Jenkins Arboretum in Berwyn, PennsylvaniaDate: 2019-06-09sign
By ILPARW
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Comments:
Posted by ILPARW (southeast Pennsylvania - Zone 6b) on Jun 9, 2019 5:45 PM

I drive about once a week past Jenkins Arboretum in southeast Pennsylvania that contains mostly American native plants of the Mid-Atlantic Region. While on a hike through the property I ran across a patch of yellow flowering Sundrops and I assumed at first they were the common species of O. fruticosa (the Narrowleaf or Shrubby Sundrops) that I see occasionally planted around in gardens and sold at many garden centers, but the label sign indicated a similar but different species of the Meadow or Prairie Sundrops. This species has a native range of about southeast Canada & New England down into Virginia to Mississippi to eastern Texas to Iowa & Wisconsin & Michigan. It is known to form dense mats and it has a shallow root system, so if it moves too far, one can easily dig some up. It is sold by some native plant nurseries.

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