Interrupted Fern (Osmunda claytoniana)

Common names:
Give a thumbs up Interrupted Fern
Give a thumbs up Clayton's Interrupted Fern

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Fern
Sun Requirements: Partial or Dappled Shade
Partial Shade to Full Shade
Full Shade
Water Preferences: Wet
Wet Mesic
Mesic
Soil pH Preferences: Moderately acid (5.6 – 6.0)
Slightly acid (6.1 – 6.5)
Neutral (6.6 – 7.3)
Minimum cold hardiness: Zone 3 -40 °C (-40 °F) to -37.2 °C (-35)
Maximum recommended zone: Zone 7b
Plant Height: 2 to 3 feet; to 5 feet sometimes
Plant Spread: 3 to 5 feet
Leaves: Deciduous
Underground structures: Rhizome
Uses: Will Naturalize
Resistances: Deer Resistant
Rabbit Resistant
Flood Resistant

Image

Photo gallery:
Location: Jenkins Arboretum in Berwyn, PennsylvaniaDate: 2012-06-10a group planted at the arboretum
By ILPARW
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Location: Jenkins Arboretum in Berwyn, PennsylvaniaDate: 2012-06-10foliage
By ILPARW
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Photo Courtesy of Homestead Farms Nursery. Used with Permission.
By Joy
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Photo Courtesy of Prairie Nursery. Used with Permission
By Joy
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Photo Courtesy of Prairie Nursery. Used with Permission
By Joy
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Photo Courtesy of Prairie Nursery. Used with Permission
By Joy
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Photo Courtesy of Lazy S'S Farm Nursery.
By Joy
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Comments:
Posted by ILPARW (southeast Pennsylvania - Zone 6b) on Sep 25, 2018 11:37 AM

Interrupted fern has a native range from northern Alabama & Georgia up through Maine into southeast Canada over into much of Minnesota down into Arkansas. Its fiddleheads that come up in early spring are silvery-white. It forms a spreading vase-shaped form of usually about 2 to 3 feet high, but can get to 5 feet if really thriving. Its infertile leaflets look much like those of the Cinnamon Fern. It gets its name of "Interrupted" by having 2 to 7 pairs of fertile leaflets in the middle of the fronds that develop into brown or tan shaggy masses of spores in spring, releasing spores. Then in mid-summer these fertile leaflets and spore masses fall of, leaving bare areas that look like the fronds have been interrupted. The root system is both fibrous and of thick, heavy rhizomes. It is sold at some large, diverse nurseries, native plant nurseries, and specialty mail order nurseries. It is not common in most landscapes. One landscape that has a good number is Frank Lloyd Wright's Talies in Wisconsin.

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aspenhill On May 20, 2015 Obtained plant
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