Bradford Pear (Pyrus calleryana 'Bradford') in the Pears Database

1 company sells this plant

Common names:
Give a thumbs up Bradford Pear
Give a thumbs up Callery Pear
Give a thumbs up Flowering Pear

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Tree
Life cycle: Perennial
Sun Requirements: Full Sun
Water Preferences: Mesic
Minimum cold hardiness: Zone 5a -28.9 °C (-20 °F) to -26.1 °C (-15 °F)
Maximum recommended zone: Zone 9a
Plant Height: 50 feet
Plant Spread: 40 feet
Leaves: Good fall color
Deciduous
Flowers: Showy
Malodorous
Flower Color: White
Bloom Size: 1"-2"
Flower Time: Spring
Underground structures: Taproot
Suitable Locations: Street Tree
Uses: Flowering Tree
Resistances: Drought tolerant
Pollinators: Various insects
Miscellaneous: Goes Dormant

Image

The ATP Top 50 Trees and ShrubsThe ATP Top 50 Trees and Shrubs
July 5, 2014

Let's open Trees and Shrubs week with a list of the most popular of these woody plants in our database. There are a lot of great plants in this list!

(Full article23 comments)
Give a thumbs up

Photo gallery:

This plant is tagged in:
Image Image Image Image Image

Comments:
Posted by SongofJoy (Clarksville, TN - Zone 6b) on Jan 15, 2013 7:10 AM

These trees are subject to breakage and are easily broken or split in very windy conditions. Almost every year a number of mature specimens are lost here.

[ Reply to this comment | Give a thumbs up ]

Posted by eclayne (Pioneer Valley south, MA, USA - Zone 6a) on Jan 15, 2013 11:52 AM

The Bradford Pear was for years a common street tree in Boston's Fort Point Channel district. Generally thought to be low maintenance, its fairly upright habit is particularly well suited to the narrow sidewalks common throughout much of Boston while the root system creates little or no heaving of brick sidewalks. Many side streets, planted exclusively with Bradfords, create a wonderful spring display. Unfortunately over the years the very windy conditions of this harbor-side area have taken a toll and the Bradfords have fallen out of favor.

[ Reply to this comment | Give a thumbs up ]

Posted by virginiarose (Virginia) on Feb 2, 2014 10:34 AM

Flowers are sterile but can cross-pollinate with other trees and produce thousands of tiny pears that produce thorny seedlings, which are invasive.

[ Reply to this comment | Give a thumbs up ]

Posted by virginiarose (Virginia) on Feb 2, 2014 10:20 AM

Surface roots and deep shade make it impossible to grow grass under it.

[ Reply to this comment | Give a thumbs up ]

Posted by virginiarose (Virginia) on Feb 2, 2014 10:21 AM

Spring flowers smell like fish.

[ Reply to this comment | Give a thumbs up ]

Posted by gardengus (Indiana Zone 5b) on Jun 8, 2014 3:37 PM

I take care of several of these trees at several homes. I personally think they create a beautiful display in the spring, but they smell awful. I have several problems with them: breakage from rather moderate or heavy winds, the endless suckers from shallow roots, and seedlings everywhere. They are on the invasive ''watch list'' of some states and banned in some cities.
I do not and would not own one of these trees. There are many other good choices for a small flowering tree.

[ Reply to this comment | Give a thumbs up ]

Discussion Threads about this plant
Thread Title Last Reply Replies
Share Your Photos by GoatDriver Dec 10, 2017 11:36 AM 3,078
Tree ID Help by vicmasters Oct 13, 2015 1:18 PM 2
Fragrant doesn't always mean good by purpleinopp Feb 5, 2017 4:21 PM 36
parent entry for Pyrus pyrifolia (Asian Pear) by dbrawner Aug 13, 2014 10:18 AM 10
Backyard Birds - April 2013 by plantladylin May 8, 2013 10:47 PM 229

« Add a new plant to the database

» Search the Pears Database: by characteristics or by cultivar name

« See the general plant entry for Pears (Pyrus)

« The Pears Database Front Page

« The Plants Database Front Page

Today's site banner is by bootandall and is called "Aster"