Japanese Yew (Taxus cuspidata 'Capitata')

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Tree
Life cycle: Perennial
Sun Requirements: Full Sun
Full Sun to Partial Shade
Water Preferences: Mesic
Dry Mesic
Dry
Soil pH Preferences: Slightly acid (6.1 – 6.5)
Neutral (6.6 – 7.3)
Slightly alkaline (7.4 – 7.8)
Minimum cold hardiness: Zone 4a -34.4 °C (-30 °F) to -31.7 °C (-25 °F)
Maximum recommended zone: Zone 7b
Plant Height: usually 10 to 15 feet; up to 50 feet possible
Plant Spread: usually 6 to 10 feet; to 30 feet possible
Leaves: Evergreen
Needled
Fruit: Showy
Edible to birds
Fruiting Time: Late summer or early fall
Fall
Late fall or early winter
Suitable Locations: Patio/Ornamental/Small Tree
Uses: Provides winter interest
Resistances: Rabbit Resistant
Humidity tolerant
Propagation: Seeds: Self fertile
Propagation: Other methods: Cuttings: Tip
Pollinators: Wind
Miscellaneous: Dioecious

Image

Photo gallery:

This plant is tagged in:
Image

Comments:
Posted by ILPARW (southeast Pennsylvania - Zone 6b) on Jan 14, 2020 12:52 PM

This cultivar is the most common Japanese Yew selection that brings forth a pyramidal tree form in the northern USA and southern Canada. It is propagated by taking only the very terminal tip of a plant to root it, as side branches rooted will result in having shrubs instead. It has been commonly planted in many yards in the Midwest, the Mid-Atlantic, and the Northeast and is sheared a lot by homeowners to keep it about 6 to 12 feet high. Unfortunately, the average homeowner does not know that it is against landscape design law to plant pointed evergreens or any such plant at the corners of a building or house because it emphasizes the vertical aspect. It is so often wrongly used one at each corner of a house or even at the front doorway. If it is planted in odd number group, then it is not such a harsh form. It is best for a formal garden or landscape. I recommend people visit Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia to check out how one should design and plant a formal European type of landscape. In Europe the less cold hardy English Yew is used instead.

[ Reply to this comment | Give a thumbs up ]

Plant Events from our members
MissMew On July 1, 1998 Obtained plant
» Post your own event for this plant

Discussion Threads about this plant
Thread Title Last Reply Replies
Salt tolerant plants by eclayne Feb 8, 2013 9:39 PM 130

« Add a new plant to the database

« The Plants Database Front Page

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "Calypso"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.