Siberian Elm (Ulmus pumila)

Common names:
Give a thumbs up Siberian Elm
Give a thumbs up Chinese Elm

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Shrub
Tree
Sun Requirements: Full Sun
Water Preferences: Mesic
Dry Mesic
Dry
Soil pH Preferences: Slightly acid (6.1 – 6.5)
Neutral (6.6 – 7.3)
Slightly alkaline (7.4 – 7.8)
Moderately alkaline (7.9 – 8.4)
Minimum cold hardiness: Zone 3 -40 °C (-40 °F) to -37.2 °C (-35)
Plant Height: 40 to 75 feet
Plant Spread: 30 to 60 feet
Leaves: Deciduous
Flowers: Inconspicuous
Flower Color: Bi-Color: maroon and green
Bloom Size: Under 1"
Flower Time: Late winter and early spring
Suitable Locations: Xeriscapic
Uses: Windbreak or Hedge
Erosion control
Will Naturalize
Resistances: Drought tolerant
Pollinators: Wind
Miscellaneous: Tolerates poor soil
Monoecious

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Comments:
Posted by ILPARW (southeast Pennsylvania - Zone 6b) on Dec 5, 2017 7:48 PM

The Siberian Elm from northeast Asia is not a really good quality tree which is very twiggy with brown fissured bark that is not interesting. I have seen a few that look good, but very few. It is fast growing of about 2 feet/year and it is brittle wooded and loses some branches due to storms, and drops lots of twigs much of the year. In many places in the Midwest, as in northeast Illinois, it is an invasive species that is usually a weed tree. It was used to replace the American Elm after the Dutch Elm Disease devastated the latter, but it does not compare. It has tiny leaves about 3/4 to 3 inches long that fall green or poor yellow-green in autumn. It should have been left in Asia.

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Posted by ILPARW (southeast Pennsylvania - Zone 6b) on Dec 5, 2017 7:48 PM

The Siberian Elm from northeast Asia is not a really good quality tree which is very twiggy with brown fissured bark that is not interesting. I have seen a few that look good, but very few. It is fast growing of about 2 feet/year and it is brittle wooded and loses some branches due to storms, and drops lots of twigs much of the year. In many places in the Midwest, as in northeast Illinois, it is an invasive species that is usually a weed tree. It was used to replace the American Elm after the Dutch Elm Disease devastated the latter, but it does not compare. It has tiny leaves about 3/4 to 3 inches long that fall green or poor yellow-green in autumn. It should have been left in Asia.

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Discussion Threads about this plant
Thread Title Last Reply Replies
New Homeowner Help Me ID My Trees! by treeplease Feb 12, 2017 9:27 AM 5
Identification of plant/tree by dbjmar Sep 8, 2016 4:35 PM 9
Slippery Elm (Ulmus rubra) by jimard8 Aug 16, 2015 2:38 PM 11
Elm (Ulmus) by lauribob Jun 15, 2015 12:33 PM 10
Mindless chatter by Muddymitts Sep 16, 2018 10:47 AM 16,034
Salt tolerant plants by eclayne Feb 8, 2013 9:39 PM 130

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