Prairie Crabapple (Malus ioensis) in the Apples Database

Common names:
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General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Tree
Life cycle: Perennial
Sun Requirements: Full Sun
Water Preferences: Mesic
Soil pH Preferences: Strongly acid (5.1 – 5.5)
Moderately acid (5.6 – 6.0)
Slightly acid (6.1 – 6.5)
Neutral (6.6 – 7.3)
Slightly alkaline (7.4 – 7.8)
Minimum cold hardiness: Zone 2 -45.6 °C (-50 °F) to -42.8 °C (-45°F)
Maximum recommended zone: Zone 8b
Plant Height: 20 to 35 feet
Plant Spread: 20 to 35 feet
Leaves: Deciduous
Fruit: Edible to birds
Fruiting Time: Late summer or early fall
Flowers: Showy
Fragrant
Flower Color: Pink
Flower Time: Spring
Late spring or early summer
Uses: Flowering Tree
Edible Parts: Fruit
Dynamic Accumulator: K (Potassium)
Wildlife Attractant: Bees
Resistances: Drought tolerant
Pollinators: Various insects
Miscellaneous: Thorned
Monoecious
Conservation status: Vulnerable (VU)

Conservation status:
Conservation status: Vulnerable
mature tree in summer

Photo gallery:
Location: Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IllinoisDate: 2015-06-19mature tree in summer
By ILPARW
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Location: Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IllinoisDate: 2015-06-19two trunks
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Location: Cantigny Park in Wheaton, ILDate: summer in 1980'smature tree in summer
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Location: Cantigny Park in Wheaton, ILDate: 2016-07-21large tree in summer
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Location: Cantigny Park in Wheaton, ILDate: 2016-07-21mature tree in landscape
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Location: Cantigny Park in Wheaton, ILDate: 2016-07-21summer foliage
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Location: Cantigny Park in Wheaton, ILDate: 2016-07-21leaves with some Cedar Rust spots
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Location: Cantigny Park in Wheaton, ILDate: 2016-07-21the almost mature green crabapples
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Location: Cantigny Park in Wheaton, ILDate: 2016-03-04mature crabapple fruit
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Location: Cantigny Park in Wheaton, ILDate: 2010-08-18mature tree in circle bed
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Comments:
Posted by ILPARW on Nov 27, 2017 8:30 PM

This species is native from central Texas thru eastern Oklahoma thru most of Missouri and Illinois, northwest Indiana, southern Wisconsin to southeast Minnesota. It was somewhat common once decades ago, but not now. Cedar Apple Rust from east Asia can be hard on native Crabapples and has lessened their numbers. The Oriental Crabapples have taken over in landscaping and in escaping cultivation. The Prairie Crab has larger fruits about 1.5 inches in diameter, even 2 inches, that turn yellow-green when mature while the oriental species have red or yellow smaller fruits. The flowers are large for crabapples and are white with pink or pink with white and bloom later in mid to late May. The leaves resemble those of Washington Hawthorn, being sort of three-lobed. It grows about 1.5 feet/year and lives about 50 to 100 years. Some native plant and specialty nurseries grow this species. The fruit has been used for jellies and jams.

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Posted by ILPARW on Nov 27, 2017 8:30 PM

This species is native from central Texas thru eastern Oklahoma thru most of Missouri and Illinois, northwest Indiana, southern Wisconsin to southeast Minnesota. It was somewhat common once decades ago, but not now. Cedar Apple Rust from east Asia can be hard on native Crabapples and has lessened their numbers. The Oriental Crabapples have taken over in landscaping and in escaping cultivation. The Prairie Crab has larger fruits about 1.5 inches in diameter, even 2 inches, that turn yellow-green when mature while the oriental species have red or yellow smaller fruits. The flowers are large for crabapples, about 1.5 inches wide, and are white with pink or pink with white and bloom later in mid to late May to early June. The leaves resemble those of Washington Hawthorn, being sort of three-lobed. It grows about 1.5 feet/year and lives about 50 to 100 years. Some native plant and specialty nurseries grow this species. The fruit has been used for jellies and jams. It differs from the Sweet Crabapple (Malus coronaria) in that the base of the leaves are usually wedge-shaped rather than round and the hairiness below remains. The twigs remain wooly. It is a small tree with wide-spreading, rigid branches with some thorns, and a broad, round-topped crown.

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Discussion Threads about this plant
Thread Title Last Reply Replies
Prairie Crab Apple malus ioensis by Geetrek Dec 1, 2017 9:35 AM 0
ID please by suesings Jul 16, 2012 3:09 PM 8

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