Prickly Pine (Pinus pungens)

Common names:
Give a thumbs up Prickly Pine
Give a thumbs up Prickle Pine
Give a thumbs up Table Mountain Pine
Give a thumbs up Hickory Pine

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Tree
Life cycle: Perennial
Sun Requirements: Full Sun
Water Preferences: Mesic
Dry Mesic
Dry
Minimum cold hardiness: Zone 6a -23.3 °C (-10 °F) to -20.6 °C (-5 °F)
Maximum recommended zone: Zone 7b
Plant Height: 20 to 40 feet, to 60 feet
Leaves: Evergreen
Needled
Resistances: Drought tolerant
Propagation: Seeds: Self fertile
Pollinators: Wind
Miscellaneous: Tolerates poor soil
Conservation status: Least Concern (LC)

Conservation status:
Conservation status: Least Concern
wild grove of big trees

Photo gallery:
Location: central Pennsylvania shot by Stan KotalaDate: fall of 2017wild grove of big trees
By ILPARW
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Location: central Pennsylvania shot by Stan KotalaDate: fall of 2017foliage and cones
By ILPARW
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Location: central Pennsylvania shot by Stan KotalaDate: fall of 2017cone on ground
By ILPARW
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Location: central Pennsylvania shot by Stan KotalaDate: fall of 2017wild trees on mountain top
By ILPARW
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Location: central Pennsylvania shot by Stan KotalaDate: winter 2017wild grove on mountain top
By ILPARW
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Location: central Pennsylvania shot by Stan KotalaDate: fall of 2017trunk and bark
By ILPARW
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Comments:
Posted by ILPARW (southeast Pennsylvania - Zone 6b) on Apr 2, 2019 8:14 PM

Table-Mountain Pine is native to the Appalachian Mountains from central Pennsylvania and a spot in northwest New Jersey down to north Georgia. It usually grows about 20 to 40 feet high, but can get to about 6o feet high with trunks up to 2 to 3 feet in diameter. Its rigid, prickly, sort of twisted needles are in bundles of 2 about 1.5 to 2.5 inches long. The spiny cones are 2.5 to 3.5 inches long and persist on the tree for a long time. It grows about 6 to 12 inches a year. It benefits from some fire burning around to open bare ground for it to drop seed to colonize such areas, as is true for a number of American conifers.

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Discussion Threads about this plant
Thread Title Last Reply Replies
What kind of pine? by Bonehead Dec 6, 2017 10:42 PM 3

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