General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Shrub
Tree
Sun Requirements: Full Sun
Full Sun to Partial Shade
Water Preferences: Wet
Wet Mesic
Soil pH Preferences: Slightly acid (6.1 – 6.5)
Neutral (6.6 – 7.3)
Minimum cold hardiness: Zone 2 -45.6 °C (-50 °F) to -42.8 °C (-45°F)
Maximum recommended zone: Zone 8b
Plant Height: 6 to 8 feet, occasionally to 20 feet, even rarely 30 feet
Leaves: Deciduous
Fruit: Edible to birds
Flowers: Inconspicuous
Flower Color: Green
Yellow
Flower Time: Spring
Late spring or early summer
Underground structures: Rhizome
Dynamic Accumulator: Mg (Magnesium)
Resistances: Flood Resistant
Propagation: Seeds: Sow in situ
Propagation: Other methods: Cuttings: Stem
Stolons and runners
Pollinators: Wind
Miscellaneous: Tolerates poor soil
Dioecious
Conservation status: Least Concern (LC)

Conservation status:
Conservation status: Least Concern
Image
Common names
  • Sand-Bar Willow
  • Sandbar Willow
  • Coyote Willow
  • Narrowleaf Willow
Botanical names
  • Accepted: Salix interior
  • Synonym: Salix exigua var. pedicellata
  • Synonym: Salix exigua var. exterior
  • Synonym: Salix exigua f. wheeleri
  • Synonym: Salix exigua var. sericans

Photo Gallery
Comments:
  • Posted by ILPARW (southeast Pennsylvania - Zone 6b) on Jul 10, 2019 10:33 AM concerning plant:
    Sanbar Willow is usually a little-branched upright shrub about 8 feet high, but it infrequently can be a small tree 20 to 30 feet with a trunk 3 to 6 inches in diameter. It has the narrowest leaves of about all willows that are 2 to 6 inches long by 1/8th to 3/8th inches wide. These linear leaves have small, distinct teeth on the margins widely spaced apart from each other. The top of the leaves are medium green and the bottoms a little lighter green. Being dioecious like other willow, the male catkins are about 1 to 2 inches long, narrowly cylindrical, with no petals or sepals, but with prominent yellow stamen. The female catkins are 1.5 to 3 inches long and mostly green, turning brownish later. This species keeps putting out catkins later than other willows, into Late June or July. It has a large native range from Louisiana & east Texas & Mississippi to most of Montana to the west and to West Virginia and to New England on the east, then up Canada into central Alaska, growing in wet places. It is a common shrub willow species in much of its range. It spreads by underground runners to form a colony. A few native plant nurseries sell some.

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