PlantsTaxus→Canadian Yew (Taxus canadensis)

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Shrub
Life cycle: Perennial
Sun Requirements: Full Sun
Full Sun to Partial Shade
Partial or Dappled Shade
Partial Shade to Full Shade
Full Shade
Water Preferences: Mesic
Dry Mesic
Dry
Soil pH Preferences: Strongly acid (5.1 – 5.5)
Moderately acid (5.6 – 6.0)
Slightly acid (6.1 – 6.5)
Neutral (6.6 – 7.3)
Slightly alkaline (7.4 – 7.8)
Minimum cold hardiness: Zone 2 -45.6 °C (-50 °F) to -42.8 °C (-45°F)
Maximum recommended zone: Zone 7b
Plant Height: 3 to 8 feet
Plant Spread: 6 to 12 feet
Leaves: Evergreen
Needled
Fruit: Showy
Edible to birds
Fruiting Time: Late summer or early fall
Uses: Provides winter interest
Will Naturalize
Resistances: Rabbit Resistant
Toxicity: Leaves are poisonous
Roots are poisonous
Other: seed is toxic, not red aril
Propagation: Seeds: Self fertile
Stratify seeds: 120 days at 60 degrees F then 120 days at 36-41 degrees F
Propagation: Other methods: Cuttings: Stem
Pollinators: Wind
Miscellaneous: Monoecious
Conservation status: Least Concern (LC)

Conservation status:
Conservation status: Least Concern
foliage and "berry"

Photo gallery:
Location: Jenkins Arboretum in Berwyn, PADate: 2014-06-22foliage and "berry"
By ILPARW
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Location: Morton Arboretum east side in Lisle, ILDate: August 2015shrub near wetland area
By ILPARW
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Location: Morton Arboretum in Midwest Collection in Lisle, ILDate: 2017-09-05the shrub planted in a landscape
By ILPARW
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Location: Morton Arboretum in Midwest Collection in Lisle, ILDate: 2017-09-05the foliage in summer
By ILPARW
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Location: Jenkins Arboretum in Berwyn, PADate: 2014-06-22a shrub in summer and shade
By ILPARW
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Location: Jenkins Arboretum in Berwyn, PADate: 2011-12-18shrub in late fall
By ILPARW
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Location: Jenkins Arboretum in Berwyn, PADate: 2012-03-18shrub in early spring
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Location: Jenkins Arboretum in Berwyn, PADate: 2014-06-22foliage and "berry" cone
By ILPARW
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Location: Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IllinoisDate: 2019-11-24mass in the Conifer Collection
By ILPARW
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Location: Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IllinoisDate: 2019-11-24foliage of plants in the mass
By ILPARW
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Comments:
Posted by ILPARW (southeast Pennsylvania - Zone 6b) on Nov 20, 2017 8:44 PM

The Canadian or American Yew has not been used in gardens or landscapes because it grows more irregular in form. It is only available from some native or specialty nurseries. I think it looks great in a naturalistic landscape, not for shearing. Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Illinois has a fantastic large mass growing on the east side in the Conifer Collection towards the south end. It is the cold hardiest Yew species. It is native to Newfoundland and southeast Canada, New England, New York, Pennsylvania, northern New Jersey, much of Ohio, Michigan, northwest Illinois, west central Indiana, Wisconsin, northern Minnesota, and some spots in the Appalachians of West Virginia and Virginia. It is slow growing of a little less than 1 foot/year and lives hundreds of years. There are several cultivars; one is 'Compacta' that is more dense, but I have not yet seen them. It is subject to winter feeding by deer like Eurasian Yews. Its needles are 1/2 to 3/4 inches long, densely set in 2 ranks and develop some reddish-brown tint in winter. Some plants are monoecious instead of being just dioecious and often are self-fertile.

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Discussion Threads about this plant
Thread Title Last Reply Replies
Do you know what kind of Yew bush this is? by zwei7 Dec 12, 2017 8:59 PM 4
Do These Evergreens Look OK To You? by Garden10 Nov 20, 2017 9:29 PM 9

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