General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Shrub
Life cycle: Perennial
Sun Requirements: Full Sun to Partial Shade
Water Preferences: Mesic
Minimum cold hardiness: Zone 5a -28.9 °C (-20 °F) to -26.1 °C (-15 °F)
Plant Height: 3 feet (.9m)
Plant Spread: 4 to 6 feet (1.2-1.8m)
Leaves: Deciduous
Fruit: Showy
Edible to birds
Fruiting Time: Summer
Late summer or early fall
Flowers: Showy
Blooms on old wood
Flower Color: Red
Bloom Size: 1"-2"
Flower Time: Spring
Uses: Windbreak or Hedge
Erosion control
Edible Parts: Fruit
Eating Methods: Cooked
Propagation: Other methods: Cuttings: Root
Division
Pollinators: Bees
Miscellaneous: With thorns/spines/prickles/teeth

Image
Common names
  • Flowering Quince
  • Japanese quince
  • Maule's quince
Botanical names
  • Accepted: Chaenomeles japonica
  • Synonym: Chaenomeles japonica var. alpina

Photo Gallery
Location: in Seiwa-en, part of the Missouri Botanical Garden
Date: Spring, 2004
Chaenomeles japonica var. alpina
Location: Philo, California
Date: 2017-03-28
Location: Riverview, Robson, B.C.
Date: 2009-05-10
 6:38 pm. This variety - a lovely rich and glowing pink.
Location: Aberdeen, NC (N. Sycamore street)
Date: February 27, 2023
Japanese quince #180 nn; LHP  513, 95-24-3 Greek compound of 2 sp
Location: Riverview, Robson, B.C.
Date: 2009-05-10
 7:00 pm. This variety is a salmon pink colour.
Location: central Illinois
Date: 2017-03-12
Plucked from bush when walking Plato.

Date: 2009-05-29
Location: in Seiwa-en, part of the Missouri Botanical Garden
Date: Spring, 2004
Chaenomeles japonica var. alpina
Location: central Illinois
Date: 2017-03-14
Location: Aberdeen, NC (N. Sycamore street)
Japanese quince #180 nn; LHB p. 513, 95-24-3, "Greek compound of

Date: c. 1884
illustration by J. N. Fitch of Chaenomeles japonica as Pyrus maul
Location: My yard, Zone 6
Date: 2011-05-04
Location: North Louisiana
Date: 2020-03-07
Flowering Quince - Near Peak

Date: 2021-03-08
Location: Pleasant Grove, Utah
Date: 2012-04-02

Photo by Ian Kirk
Location: IL
Date: 2016-04-19
Grown from wintersown seed.
Location: IL
Date: 2015-09-14
Location: Indiana zone 5
Date: 2013-06-18
Location: Holladay, UT
Location: central Illinois
Date: 2014-05-02
Location: Pleasant Grove Utah
Date: 2012-04-02
Location: Pleasant Grove, Utah
Date: 2012-04-02
Location: Botanical Garden Meise (Belgium)
Date: 2016-11-07

Date: 2014-03-04
Location: Cedarhome, Washington
Date: 2017-04-21
Location: Cedarhome, Washington
Date: 2017-04-21
Location: Fairfax, Virginia (Outdoors)
Location: central Illinois
Date: 2017-04-26
Location: Copenhagen Botanical Garden, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Location: My yard, Zone 6
Date: 2011-05-04
Location: Winchester, Hampshire, England.
Date: 2012-03-24
Ornamental quince in bloom.
Location: My yard, Zone 6
Date: 2011-05-04
Location: My yard, Zone 6
Date: 2011-05-04
Location: My yard, Zone 6
Date: 2011-05-04
Location: My yard, Zone 6
Date: 2011-05-04
Comments:
  • Posted by gardengus (Indiana Zone 5b) on Dec 14, 2013 10:54 AM concerning plant:
    This bush is easy to grow with little or no maintenance, except to trim to size once a year . This is best done just after flowering for abundance of flowers next year.
    Old established bushes are very difficult to remove and will continue to shoot up sprouts from root pieces for years.
  • Posted by jathton (Oklahoma City, OK - Zone 7a) on Aug 12, 2020 12:05 PM concerning plant:
    Oklahoma City gardens are overrun with 'Texas Scarlet' Flowering Quince... gangly old shrubs that were planted "back in the day" when the red and white varieties were the only ones offered. Every garden with flowering shrubs contained, it seemed, a red flowering quince and a yellow Forsythia... widely known as the two "harbingers of spring."
    If for no other reason than for the sake of diversity it is fortunate that a few new varieties have been introduced in the past 2-3 decades. In my opinion two of the finest "new" offerings are 'Toyo-Nishiki' and Chaenomeles japonica var. alpina.
    In the latters case the flowers are doubles colored a beautiful shade of peachy orange. Unlike the older forms this variety normally grows much wider than tall... typically 3 feet by 1 foot. It produces small, bitter tasting, pleasantly scented fruit in fall... fruit that is sometimes turned into delicious jellies and preserves.
    This particular variety of quince is apparently much easier to grow than it is to find... but a search is well worth the effort. This is a very beautiful shrub in bloom.
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