The Main Plant entry for Artichokes (Cynara scolymus)

This database entry exists to show plant data and photos that apply generically to all Artichokes.

General Plant Information (Edit)
Life cycle: Perennial
Water Preferences: Mesic
Minimum cold hardiness: Zone 6a -23.3 °C (-10 °F) to -20.6 °C (-5 °F)
Maximum recommended zone: Zone 10b
Flower Time: Summer
Uses: Vegetable
Edible Parts: Fruit
Wildlife Attractant: Bees
Resistances: Salt tolerant
Pollinators: Moths and Butterflies
Bees

Image

This plant is tagged in:
Image

Comments:
Posted by Mindy03 (Delta KY) on Sep 29, 2011 6:08 PM

Honey bees get nectar from this plant

[ Reply to this comment | Give a thumbs up ]

Posted by Marilyn (Northern KY - Zone 6a) on May 21, 2013 11:10 PM

"Artichokes can be produced from seeds or from vegetative means such as division, root cuttings or micropropagation. Though technically perennials that normally produce the edible flower only during the second and subsequent years, certain varieties of artichoke can be grown from seed as annuals, producing a limited harvest at the end of the first growing season, even in regions where the plants are not normally winter-hardy. This means home gardeners in northern regions can attempt to produce a crop without the need to overwinter plants with special treatment or protection. The recently introduced seed cultivar 'Imperial Star' has been bred to produce in the first year without such measures. An even newer cultivar, 'Northern Star', is said to be able to overwinter in more northerly climates, and readily survives subzero temperatures.

Commercial culture is limited to warm areas in USDA hardiness zone 7 and above. It requires good soil, regular watering and feeding, plus frost protection in winter. Rooted suckers can be planted each year, so mature specimens can be disposed of after a few years, as each individual plant lives only a few years. The peak season for artichoke harvesting is the spring, but they can continue to be harvested throughout the summer, with another peak period in midautumn."

Taken from wikipedia's page at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A...

[ Reply to this comment | Give a thumbs up ]

Posted by vic (North Carolina) on Jan 5, 2014 3:42 AM

Artichokes are susceptible to snails, aphids, and artichoke plum moth.

[ Reply to this comment | Give a thumbs up ]

« Add a new plant to the database

« The Plants Database Front Page

Today's site banner is by Marilyn and is called "Salvia and Crocosmia in late June"