Plant ID forum: Conifer ID

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Cincinnati OH - SouthWest Ohio (Zone 6a)
dtownjbrown
Jan 5, 2019 8:50 AM CST
Can someone help me identify what kind of evergreen these are? The pic on the left came from a very tall tree (towers over my neighbor's two story house) and the one on the right is from a bushy shrub that's about 6-7ft tall.
Thumb of 2019-01-05/dtownjbrown/9b9106

The branch bark on the tree is somewhat smooth with needles measuring 1-1.5 inches long.
Thumb of 2019-01-05/dtownjbrown/dce1e3

The bark on the shrub has more ridges with needles about 2-3 inches long. The bark
Thumb of 2019-01-05/dtownjbrown/9b5b10

Can someone help me ID what types these are?
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
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porkpal
Jan 5, 2019 9:11 AM CST
Pictures of the whole plant, when possible, are always helpful.
Porkpal
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
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ViburnumValley
Jan 5, 2019 9:37 AM CST
Yes, whole plants please. Also, look and see if there are any cones evident and photo them.

I suspect the taller tree is likely a Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), or possibly a Spruce of some sort. Growing habit, cones, and some closeup pics of the buds should nail this one down.

The other plant is likely a Mugo Pine (Pinus mugo). It appears to have two needles per bunch, and has several years of persistent needles - which is indicative of this species. 6-7' tall is larger than what most people expect of this species, but certainly not unheard of for an older mature plant in the Ohio River valley region.

Show us more...
John
Cincinnati OH - SouthWest Ohio (Zone 6a)
dtownjbrown
Jan 5, 2019 5:50 PM CST
Okay, I will take some whole plant pics in the AM. Thanks Thank You!
Cincinnati OH - SouthWest Ohio (Zone 6a)
dtownjbrown
Jan 6, 2019 9:00 AM CST
Good Morning - here are the whole plant photos I promised.
Thumb of 2019-01-06/dtownjbrown/2c0c96 Thumb of 2019-01-06/dtownjbrown/782445

It looks like the 6ft tall bushy shrub was orginially planted next to a smaller variegated evergreen (see bottom left of this pic) but has overgrown it.
Thumb of 2019-01-06/dtownjbrown/d63a55

I also took a picture of the cones. The one on the left is from the very tall tree and the one on the right is from the 6ft bushy shrub.
Thumb of 2019-01-06/dtownjbrown/5660fa

Thanks again Thank You!
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
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ViburnumValley
Jan 6, 2019 10:13 AM CST
Your additional images confirm my initial IDs. You have a large Douglas-fir there, and a mature Mugo Pine. Thank you for the additional photo information.

Some advice: try to take pictures with the sun at your back, instead of toward the sun. Toward the sun, the plant becomes a silhouette and details are pretty much lost.

In your last picture, the cone on the left is textbook Pseudotsuga sp., with the bracts extended from the scales of the cone. That is a great ID feature which will always separate Douglas-firs from true Firs (Abies sp.), Spruces (Picea sp.), and Pines (Pinus sp.). Pseudotsuga menziesii is commonly planted in the Ohio River valley region, versus some of the other species in the Douglas-fir clan.

The two plant parts on the right in that last picture are terminal buds on the left and maybe a spent male pollen producing reproductive structure on the right. Those are not cones of the Mugo Pine.

It appears your neighbor's house had a varied collection of smaller or slower growing species. The variegated evergreen (being swallowed by the Mugo Pine) is a Euonymus species, probably one of the many Euonymus fortunei selections available in retail. There are also a couple Picea glauca var. conica - Dwarf Alberta Spruce flanking the steps there.

What part of town are these plants growing in? I visit Cincinnati frequently to attend meetings and tours with an avid group of horticultural professionals and enthusiasts, and we cover quite a bit of ground. We might be strolling through your neighborhood one of these days...
John
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
Jan 6, 2019 12:12 PM CST
Thank you, John, for the evergreen education.
Porkpal
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
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ViburnumValley
Jan 6, 2019 12:51 PM CST
Sunday morning + 3 cups of coffee = information download.

You are quite welcome.
John
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Jan 6, 2019 1:13 PM CST
"In your last picture, the cone on the left is textbook Pseudotsuga sp., with the bracts extended from the scales of the cone"

I was taught to look for "rats running under shingles" to identify Douglas fir cones, always remembered it after that!
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
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ViburnumValley
Jan 6, 2019 2:24 PM CST
Vivid imagery, indeed!
John
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jan 6, 2019 6:02 PM CST
Here are some Mugo Pine cones, usually found down in the center of the bush. The cones are small, less than an inch, but really are pinecones as Mugo Pines really are pines.
Thumb of 2019-01-06/DaisyI/cbf831 Thumb of 2019-01-06/DaisyI/f70c41

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Cincinnati OH - SouthWest Ohio (Zone 6a)
dtownjbrown
Jan 6, 2019 8:24 PM CST
ViburnumValley said:What part of town are these plants growing in? I visit Cincinnati frequently to attend meetings and tours with an avid group of horticultural professionals and enthusiasts, and we cover quite a bit of ground. We might be strolling through your neighborhood one of these days...


On one of the beautiful tree-lined streets of historic College Hill, near the business district on Hamilton Avenue. I am planning an edible landscape and would like to include red currants but recently learned that could potentially be detrimental to White Pines within 500 ft of the planting site....thus my desire to correctly identify the evergreens in yard's adjacent to mine.
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
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ViburnumValley
Jan 8, 2019 8:56 PM CST
Good plan - White Pine Blister Rust is not a fun pathogen to promulgate.

Good luck with your endeavors. Know that there are a whole lot of edibles - especially natives - that are great and easy to grow and don't contribute to denigration of the environment around you.
John

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