Houseplants forum: Houseplants with a wood stove?

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Name: Megan
RI (Zone 6b)
Image
Megos1286
Jan 21, 2019 4:23 AM CST
Hi all,
Last winter we bought/moved in to an older farmhouse. 1/2 of the main living area is heated with oil, the other 1/2 is primarily heated by a wood stove. Our bedrooms upstairs have electric heat. It will take at least another year to update the heating systems, although we will always keep the wood stove. As you can imagine our home is pretty dry and we run several humidifiers.
The room our wood stove is in has the most windows and the best light. SE & SW windows. Are there any houseplants that could live in that room, close proximity to the wood stove and withstand varying temperatures from 62-90? I assumed not, so it is a plant-less room for the time being!
Name: Gene Staver
Portage WI 53901 (Zone 5a)
Herbs Annuals Hummingbirder Butterflies Garden Photography Cactus and Succulents
Birds Cat Lover Houseplants Garden Sages
Image
gasrocks
Jan 21, 2019 5:58 AM CST
Welcome. Cactus and succulents prefer dry air. Temps above 62F may be fine. How about light? But, IMO, the main issue will be that you get plants you like as opposed to what some say might work. Gene
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Jan 21, 2019 12:11 PM CST
Most plants available for indoor use do not require high humidity and will do fine in the temps you have. Available light is the single most important consideration as some plants need more than others. Most folks tend to overestimate the available light, so keep that in mind.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Megan
RI (Zone 6b)
Image
Megos1286
Jan 21, 2019 7:03 PM CST
Hi Gene,
I have a lengthy list of plants I wish to add to my collection, I just don't want to kill anything with the dry heat in winter. There are lots of windows in that room, letting in plenty of SE & SW light.
I would love a huge ficus lyrata, but again don't want to char it!
I have a monstera deliciosa that I think would really like the lighting that room provides too. Not sure if humidifiers would be enough?
Name: Gene Staver
Portage WI 53901 (Zone 5a)
Herbs Annuals Hummingbirder Butterflies Garden Photography Cactus and Succulents
Birds Cat Lover Houseplants Garden Sages
Image
gasrocks
Jan 21, 2019 7:33 PM CST
As will mentioned, people tend to over estimate how much light they have. Light will indeed be the issue not heat and humidity.
Name: Megan
RI (Zone 6b)
Image
Megos1286
Jan 22, 2019 4:26 AM CST
Thanks so much! This is incredibly helpful! Hurray!
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Jan 22, 2019 3:43 PM CST
Light intensity drops off rapidly with every foot of distance from the windows. The room may appear very sunny to your eyes, but a plant across the room from a window probably would not get enough light.

Ficus lyratas require a lot of direct indoor sunlight. You will not char it.

Monsteras are low to medium light plant that do need protection from very much direct sunlight.

I am sure that all of the plants on your list will do fine in dry air. Increased humidity can be good for you and your furniture, however.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Megan
RI (Zone 6b)
Image
Megos1286
Jan 22, 2019 6:29 PM CST
Thanks Will, time to refill our humidifiers - haha!

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