Ask a Question forum: Viburnum in the shade?

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Bloomington, Indiana (Zone 6a)
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CrazedHoosier
Feb 5, 2019 11:31 AM CST
Hello! I'm now planning a different garden that I actually had no idea I had access to. I'm very excited because this raised bed had sat untouched for years because I was told planting things in it could cause issues with the foundation of my home. Just recently, I got the all-clear to plant it up! I decided to start with some spring bulbs, and planted 18 woodland hyacinths. I have no idea what to do now, though. The bed is 18x4 feet, and is usually under the protection of the house's overhang except for around 4 hours of the day. I have considered putting viburnums in there, but am not sure if they will work. Honestly, I could really use some help with this garden overall. Could anyone recommend some shade tolerant, beautiful shrubs? I'd also love some ideas for some other shade plants to add!
[Last edited by CrazedHoosier - Feb 5, 2019 2:23 PM (+)]
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Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Feb 5, 2019 2:39 PM CST
The first hurdle is how shrubs under the overhang will get water.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Bloomington, Indiana (Zone 6a)
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CrazedHoosier
Feb 5, 2019 2:49 PM CST
Shadegardener said:The first hurdle is how shrubs under the overhang will get water.


The garden is actually right next to my hose! I can give a very controlled amount of water.
Hurst, TX (Zone 8a)
Dog Lover Region: Texas
luis_pr
Feb 5, 2019 4:41 PM CST
Vibirnums and azaleas/rhodies are good choices for part shade and evergreen for me. Hydrangeas and some salvias do well in part shade but read the labels. Some small nbr of salvias are full shade. In z6, I would use hydrangea paniculata (the Pee Gee types), arborescens (the Annabelle types) or quercifolia (oakleaf hydrangeas). For azaleas, I would try reblooming Encore Azaleas (some are hardy to 6a but others only to 7a so ck the labels).
[Last edited by luis_pr - Feb 5, 2019 4:42 PM (+)]
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Bloomington, Indiana (Zone 6a)
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CrazedHoosier
Feb 5, 2019 5:47 PM CST
luis_pr said:Vibirnums and azaleas/rhodies are good choices for part shade and evergreen for me. Hydrangeas and some salvias do well in part shade but read the labels. Some small nbr of salvias are full shade. In z6, I would use hydrangea paniculata (the Pee Gee types), arborescens (the Annabelle types) or quercifolia (oakleaf hydrangeas). For azaleas, I would try reblooming Encore Azaleas (some are hardy to 6a but others only to 7a so ck the labels).


I actually have a reblooming azalea that I planted last year! It did great, and I am hoping it will come back well this year considering it is hardy to zone 6. I actually have a paniculata hydrangea in partial shade as well. It bloomed beautifully last year, but then quit a bit early. I'm hoping it was just because it wasn't established yet, so it sent energy to establish and then quit blooming. I love limelight and little light panicle hydrangeas, but definitely do not want to risk not seeing their beautiful blooms. Would they be okay in that scenario? I noticed people plant panicle hydrangeas in filtered sun and somehow get huge blooms still! If I can do that, I'm pretty much sold on the limelight hydrangeas! Also, this is the flower bed in question...
Thumb of 2019-02-05/CrazedHoosier/c39f16

Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Native Plants and Wildflowers Region: Mid-Atlantic Composter Region: Maryland Birds
Cat Lover Dog Lover Region: United States of America
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sallyg
Feb 5, 2019 7:22 PM CST
Is that a split foyer? How tall is the space under the overhang?
I would stay away from shrubs of any size- Oakleafs and peegees sound much too big eventually.
You have nice brick there. Foundation shrubs are used to cover ugly concrete foundations, not pretty brick. Plant your bigger woody items out in the yard.
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)
Bloomington, Indiana (Zone 6a)
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CrazedHoosier
Feb 5, 2019 7:54 PM CST
sallyg said:Is that a split foyer? How tall is the space under the overhang?
I would stay away from shrubs of any size- Oakleafs and peegees sound much too big eventually.
You have nice brick there. Foundation shrubs are used to cover ugly concrete foundations, not pretty brick. Plant your bigger woody items out in the yard.


It is a split foyer. The space under the overhang is about 4.5 feet in height. That's why I was looking at a little lime hydrangea! They would fit almost perfectly! I personally don't care much for brick, no matter how pretty it is. The entire lower part of the house is brick anyway, so you wouldn't miss much.
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Native Plants and Wildflowers Region: Mid-Atlantic Composter Region: Maryland Birds
Cat Lover Dog Lover Region: United States of America
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sallyg
Feb 5, 2019 9:40 PM CST
Little lime sounds great. Thumbs up
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)
Hurst, TX (Zone 8a)
Dog Lover Region: Texas
luis_pr
Feb 5, 2019 10:24 PM CST
Paniculatas bloom best in full sun when in Michigan. I planted Little Lime in full but bright shade because my summer is way too strong and LL still blooms fine. Another similar paniculata is Bobo.
[Last edited by luis_pr - Feb 5, 2019 10:37 PM (+)]
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Bloomington, Indiana (Zone 6a)
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CrazedHoosier
Feb 6, 2019 12:45 AM CST
luis_pr said:Paniculatas bloom best in full sun when in Michigan. I planted Little Lime in full but bright shade because my summer is way too strong and LL still blooms fine. Another similar paniculata is Bobo.


Well, Southern Indiana is definitely not Michigan! Southern Indiana summers are intense and sometimes downright brutal. We are at a 7 where I live on the AHS heat-zone map. Where you live in Texas is at around an 8, so maybe I could get away with a more shady situation as well. I've thought about the Bobo as well, and actually worked with them a lot when I worked at a plant nursery. Those little shrubs could take some abuse! For the first few days, they were left in a gravel parking lot in 95 degree weather. They were in their 3 gallon nursery cans and watered once per day by hose, and they still looked absolutely gorgeous! I'll add them to the list of shrubs I'm considering. Now I need to start thinking about some gorgeous hostas...
Name: Cory Moore
Florida
MooreLandscapeInc
Feb 6, 2019 7:59 AM CST
Viburnum are a great choice! We use them all the time here in South Florida in almost all situations and rarely experience difficulty. I will provide links to other plants that really enjoy shade! I hope you find it helpful! If you do give us a thumbs up!

https://naplesluxurylandscaper...

https://naplesluxurylandscaper...

https://naplesluxurylandscaper...

https://naplesluxurylandscaper...

Have an awesome day!

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