Sandbox forum: What can we do about climate change?

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East-Central Mississippi (Zone 8a)
Any silver lining could have clouds
Region: Mississippi Native Plants and Wildflowers Cactus and Succulents Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
RadlyRootbound
Mar 11, 2019 8:47 PM CST
Possibly off-topic (climate change), but related to emissions from worn engines, my great-uncle made a comment one day about why newer cars were able to run fine after 100,000 miles, when it was common for older cars to need their engines rebuilt after 100k miles. He said that it wasn't because the new cars were made better (he said the opposite was true), but because many of the roads the older cars were driven on were dirt/gravel, and most of those roads have since been paved, so the newer cars don't have to deal with the large dust and grit issue that plagued the older cars. When he said that, the simple logic of it took me by surprise because it was such an obvious factor, yet so easily overlooked until attention is focused on it. Of course, driving on dirt roads would not only increase the wear inside the engine (an air filter doesn't stop the very finest particles of dust), but would also increase the wear to suspension and all moving parts. So just because newer cars may last somewhat longer before needing repairs doesn't necessarily mean they are made better, they just have a less dusty environment to operate in. Also, when they do need repairs, the cost is often more than the car is worth, so they end up in a junkyard before being recycled. At least with the older vehicles, repairs are generally much less expensive, and many can be done by the owner. (Also, recycling a vehicle is not necessarily an environmental win. Recycling a vehicle and replacing it with a new one leaves an extremely large carbon footprint when compared to repairing one and continuing to operate it.)

Radly
"He who says his plants are always bigger & better than anyone else's and his grass, greener, is likely feeding them manure, like he's feeding you." ~Radly
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
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McCannon
Mar 12, 2019 5:29 AM CST
A lot of engine longevity can be attributed to better lubricants, too. Oil change intervals are generally quite a bit longer.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We could learn much from them!
East-Central Mississippi (Zone 8a)
Any silver lining could have clouds
Region: Mississippi Native Plants and Wildflowers Cactus and Succulents Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
RadlyRootbound
Mar 12, 2019 1:20 PM CST
That is true, Mac, and especially so for synthetic oils. Now if we could just convince major corporations to go back to the practice of making products that will last, like they used to do, instead of designing obsolescence into everything so that it gets thrown away and replaced sooner, we could cut back on a whole lot of our waste and energy required to recycle old products into new products that is the norm in our throw-away culture.

Remember how much recycling was practiced during WWII, when every single tin can or other little metal item and tire was collected to put toward the war effort? If we could rally that spirit today, we could really put a dent in the landfill build-up. Wood, paper, glass, plastics and metals could all be recycled, and what unusable trash would that leave? Not much. If you want to get government's assistance in protecting the environment, let it be in the form of subsidies to boost the incentive for people to sell recyclables to recyclers instead of recycling being a time-consuming burden that doesn't pay anything but a warm, cozy feeling for some.

When I was young, kids would collect returnable coke bottles along the roads to make money for themselves. (Aluminum cans came later.) Kids today could be encouraged to do the same sort of things in neighborhoods, collecting glass, plastic, paper, tin cans and other metals from neighbors to sell to recyclers. But children today aren't encouraged to make extra money for themselves (and they expect everything to be handed to them), and neighborhoods aren't as neighborly as they once were. But I do think if kids were encouraged to do this, then many adults would respond by making the effort to furnish rinsed glass and other recyclables to the kids, thus inspiring a positive new recycling program. If the government would help promote such a program, perhaps with a set age group of children (maybe 10 to 15?), then not only could recycling be ramped up, but children would learn the valuable life-lesson of how to earn money for themselves, something that is far too absent today. Children of this age group now go out to sell cookies and other things for clubs, and adults are usually happy to buy what they can afford, but this wouldn't even cost them anything but a little time and effort to rinse and save recyclables, and they'd get the same good feeling for helping kids. Even if the program was not a break-even proposition for the government, the positive influence and results of such a grass-roots program for the environment and our culture, not to mention bringing neighborhoods closer once more, would be immediate and long-lasting.

Just a thought. Shrug!

Radly
"He who says his plants are always bigger & better than anyone else's and his grass, greener, is likely feeding them manure, like he's feeding you." ~Radly
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Mar 12, 2019 1:28 PM CST
Planned obsolescence is part of the new business model, in part driven by rapid technological advances.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We could learn much from them!
East-Central Mississippi (Zone 8a)
Any silver lining could have clouds
Region: Mississippi Native Plants and Wildflowers Cactus and Succulents Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
RadlyRootbound
Mar 12, 2019 1:47 PM CST
McCannon said:Planned obsolescence is part of the new business model, in part driven by rapid technological advances.


I understand that, but I prefer the older business model and philosophy of building a product the best you can, made to last, and higher quality earned a higher price and a larger marketshare. Effort and long-lasting quality were rewarded and touted as a selling point, and the consumer could depend on his investment in the product to serve him for many years. That USED to be "the American way", but not now.

Radly
"He who says his plants are always bigger & better than anyone else's and his grass, greener, is likely feeding them manure, like he's feeding you." ~Radly
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Mar 12, 2019 3:53 PM CST
Science on the way to improving renewable energy which will help reduce fossil fuel emissions.

New fuel cell could help fix the renewable energy storage problem
https://www.sciencemag.org/new...
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We could learn much from them!
Name: Ann ~Heat zn 9, Sunset
North Fl. (Zone 8b)
Garden Sages Native Plants and Wildflowers Xeriscape Organic Gardener I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level
Butterflies Charter ATP Member Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Dog Lover Birds
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flaflwrgrl
Mar 12, 2019 4:08 PM CST
Pretty cool. I hope they can work it all out.
I am a strong believer in the simple fact is that what matters in this life is how we treat others. I think that's what living is all about. Not what I've done in my life but how I've treated others.
~~ Sharon Brown ~~



Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Mar 12, 2019 4:49 PM CST
McCannon said:Science on the way to improving renewable energy which will help reduce fossil fuel emissions.
New fuel cell could help fix the renewable energy storage problem

Yesiree, I remember that 50 mpg carb. , well, on the net now they talk about a 100 mpg carb. it just never came to be, but it is out there some where, hidden by big oil blah, blah, blah. Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing

The O'Hayre group's latest work is "impressive," Haile says. "The electricity you are putting in is making H2 and not heating up your system. They did a really good job with that." Still, she cautions, both her new device and the one from the O'Hayre lab are small laboratory demonstrations. For the technology to have a societal impact, researchers will need to scale up the button-size devices, a process that typically reduces performance. If engineers can make that happen, the cost of storing renewable energy could drop precipitously, helping utilities do away with their dependence on fossil fuels.
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Mar 12, 2019 7:04 PM CST
Scientists and engineers have a way of upscaling and still attaining their performance goals. I wouldn't knock their efforts at this early stage.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We could learn much from them!

Alaskalady
Mar 16, 2019 7:10 PM CST
It is refreshing to see people express an interest in actually working to halt climate change. I live in Alaska which is a hotbed of climate change. The Arctic has the fastest climate change in the world. If you want to see glaciers before they are all gone you can take a boat tour and watch glaciers calving into the ocean. Just take a train and ferry to get here.

Jets not only pollute more than other kinds of transportation, they put the climate change pollution right where it does the most harm.

Rocket stoves, also known as wood gassification stoves, can be part of the answer to what we can do to stop making climate change worse. They can run on various types of fuel, but wood is most common. They can use 80-90% less fuel than regular stoves and can simultaneously serve other purposes, like water heating and electrical generation. If combined with mass heat storage, a single fire can give heat released slowly from the mass for as long as a day afterwards.

There are youtube videos that show how you can make a simple camp rocket stove out of tin cans. Ernie and Erica Wisner teach workshops on how to build your own rocket mass heaters. They also have a book.

Paul Wheaton of Permies.com has lots of material about building rocket mass heaters, including those meant for greenhouses.

Pinterest has great threads about rocket stoves and how to make your own. If you look at these, be sure to look at those in foreign languages. You do not need to understand the language to look at the pictures. They have some beautiful ones.

A lot of the people on this site are already doing their bit for climate change mitigation. Eating locally produced foods is an important way that we can help. You can't get more local with food than growing it at home. Thank You!
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Mar 16, 2019 7:59 PM CST
@Alaskalady You might consider posting some links to the subjects you referenced. That can lead to a more in-deapth conversation on any given topic. We heat with wood and know many others that do as well. The rocket stove you mentioned seems to be something worth looking at.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We could learn much from them!
Name: Ann ~Heat zn 9, Sunset
North Fl. (Zone 8b)
Garden Sages Native Plants and Wildflowers Xeriscape Organic Gardener I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level
Butterflies Charter ATP Member Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Dog Lover Birds
Image
flaflwrgrl
Mar 16, 2019 8:23 PM CST
Alaskalady said something that brought to mind a gripe I have long had & I think I need to gripe about it again.
Locally grown food......
I live in FL. FL is citrus country. Yet, I go to the grocery store & I can't get FL citrus. They sell CA citrus. My best friend lives in AL & she gets FL tomatoes while we here in FL get tomatoes from Canada. I could go on.
I want to know why this is. To me, it makes zero sense & is wasting a lot of energy shipping things farther afield than they need to be. This also means they use more energy keeping these things refrigerated longer to reach the more distant location.
I am a strong believer in the simple fact is that what matters in this life is how we treat others. I think that's what living is all about. Not what I've done in my life but how I've treated others.
~~ Sharon Brown ~~



Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Mar 16, 2019 8:38 PM CST
Ann, I think a lot of that has to do with warehousing and shelf life. When I lived in FL we got all our citrus locally. I can't vouch for where tomatoes came from but I'd guess a Florida farmer, probably somewhere in the southern part of the state. The farmer's market always had lots of FL-grown produce.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We could learn much from them!

Alaskalady
Mar 16, 2019 9:10 PM CST
Lol about the long distance produce. I think we got the record. I discovered New Zealand apples in a local produce section. I don't think they could come from further away unless they were off planet. I don't begrudge the New Zealanders their sales, but that distance is excessive.

A sort of local guy started selling tiny perfect apples from his property. He collected apple seeds from all over the world. He grew 100 apple trees there. The Romanian ones are the best so far.

Alaskalady
Mar 16, 2019 10:03 PM CST
Here is a link to a very basic rocket stove with little or no cost:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=...

You can make rocket stoves from a great variety of materials. I will get links to different types. You can buy some commercial ones, mostly metal. A guy in New England makes some beautiful mass heat storage rocket stoves from sandstone. The Finnish have traditional ones similar to his. In India they have Tandoori stoves that are a type of pottery rocket stove. Russians have traditional ceramic ones that are said to be able to store heat from one fire up to three days.

Alaskalady
Mar 16, 2019 11:06 PM CST
Okay! I found a nice video about making a rocket stove out of a concrete/perlite mix. He made a few errors in his design, but he shows the comments about correcting these, so it is ok.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=...

His way of making everything look easy is important to me because I took a course in the Montessori teaching method. I am obsessed with the part of the method where you practice until you can make what you are doing look easy so that students will do it easily also.

It is important that people know that making a rocket stove can be easy.

Rocket stoves have their vortex in different places according to how they are designed. This guy is mixing ideas from more advanced rocket stoves with his simple one. The vortex for the simple ones tends to be in about the spot where the elbow inside is located.

The vortex whirls around and collects the gases and carbon particles given off by the fuel. It burns the gases and carbon as well as the fuel itself. This is what makes rocket stoves so efficient. They can save up to 95% of fuel.

That kind of efficiency is not going to happen in one of these simple homemade rocket stoves. They will still save you a whole lot of fuel. At the same time they burn very clean and can help stop making climate change worse.
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Apr 11, 2019 12:47 PM CST
For the disbelievers, here's some folks that are experiencing the effects up close and personal.

Awash: Midcoast Towns Face the Prospect of Rising Seas
https://freepressonline.com/Co...
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We could learn much from them!
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Apr 11, 2019 4:41 PM CST
Don't put buildings in a flood plain.
Stupid is as stupid does.

Minn. had very , very dry years in the seventies till the mid eighties.
People built on land that had been dry for decades, then the weather shifted and lakes that once were, were again.
The people wanted the State to do something about the water; the State did.

They said remove the buildings and anything related to them from the flood plain or the State would and they would be charged for it plus be fined.
Devils Lake in North Dakota is the biggest example of stupidity has just rewards with the farmers peeing and moaning about how it is not fair when they are simply paying the lesson for building on a flood plain .
Over one hundred years ago the local Indians told them I would not build there, the lake will be back.

That applies to ocean and sea shore property also.
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Apr 11, 2019 5:03 PM CST
Has nothing to do with stupid. Those homes were built long before there was a rising sea level threat.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We could learn much from them!
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Apr 11, 2019 5:51 PM CST
McCannon said:Has nothing to do with stupid. Those homes were built long before there was a rising sea level threat.
So were the ones in Minn. and N. Dakota.
You build by water you had better darn well be willing to deal with rising water; if not get the heck out.


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