Ask a Question forum: Pruning Hydrangea Macrophylla???

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Name: Walter Fritsch Jr
Connecticut (Zone 6a)
Retired Gone Postal, Retired Army T
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Wally2007
Mar 18, 2019 1:08 PM CST
I have had this beauty for several years and mistakenly at one time pruned it at the wrong time and almost lost it. Again I am in doubt as to what to do this year. I have several Hydrangea throughout my yard. They may be hard to identify three I have pruned already and the other I haven't touched. Please advise.

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Hurst, TX (Zone 8a)
Dog Lover Region: Texas
luis_pr
Mar 19, 2019 8:22 AM CST
Macrophyllas produce Spring blooms from flower buds that develop as far back as July (but probably August in CT). These flower buds are invisible now but when they open, they will look like a tiny broccoli head. As a result, you do not want to prune now. Best time to prune is any time after it has bloomed but before the end of June.

Serratas and Oakleaf Hydrangeas - similar to macrophyllas. Prune after they bloom but before the end of June.

Arborescens - produces flower buds in mid-to-late Spring so it can be pruned now. Also known as Smooth Hydrangea and as Annabelle Hydrangea.

Paniculata - produces flower buds in late Spring to early Summer so it can be pruned now too. Also known as Pee Gee Hydrangeas.

Stems that do not leaf out by the end of May stand a very low chance of ever leafing out this year and may be cut all the way down if they do not leaf out by late May.

Other than removing dead wood, hydrangeas do not need to be pruned much.
[Last edited by luis_pr - Mar 19, 2019 8:38 AM (+)]
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Name: Walter Fritsch Jr
Connecticut (Zone 6a)
Retired Gone Postal, Retired Army T
Image
Wally2007
Mar 19, 2019 11:44 AM CST
Thank you for your prompt reply. Your advice is well taken. The first two images on my page are of the lace ???? breed. Year before last I cut them back all the way to roughly four or so inches to the ground and last year they bloomed well. Right next to them I have a hearty Euonymus which I had for several years. Each year I cut it back to allow for my lace to spread somewhat.
Thanks Again
Hurst, TX (Zone 8a)
Dog Lover Region: Texas
luis_pr
Mar 19, 2019 12:23 PM CST
You're welcome. Pruning-wise, the macrophyllas that produce the lacecap blooms should be handled same as the macrophyllas that produce the mophead blooms.

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