Avatar for optimusLime
Apr 21, 2019 1:39 PM CST

Hi there,

There are portions of my back- and side-yard that are sloped back toward my house foundation that I'd like to re-grade.

For the back yard, the large concrete slab has sunken and is sloping towards the foundation. I'd like to remove the large curved slab (keeping the concrete walkway that's heading off to the right of the photo) and back-fill it so the slope goes away from the house. My plan then is to build a deck over it, so I'm not looking to re-sod or build any garden beds there.
Thumb of 2019-04-21/optimusLime/d00141

For the side yard, my neighbor's grade is higher than mine (they did a landscaping job several years back). Again, here I'll remove the concrete sidewalk and re-grade. I may also add window wells by the windows.
Thumb of 2019-04-21/optimusLime/5c7c64

My questions are:
-When I back-fill by my foundation, can I just use topsoil for it all? Would I have to add a layer of clay? My feeling is clay would be less likely become compacted in the future (thus requiring another re-grade) than topsoil, but I know very little about this kind of thing.
-Regardless of whether I use topsoil or topsoil/clay (or some other product), will I need to tamp the dirt to compact it? Again, I'm afraid of my back-filling job just getting compressed over the years, requiring me to do this all again.
-I'm told after re-grading, it's likely a year or two before you should pour any slabs to allow the ground to settle. I want to have some kind of walkway to replace the concrete from my side yard. Could I just use paving stones?

Couple other notes:
-I've gotten some quotes for this project (~$6000 including removal of concrete, regrading of the whole house (not just the back and side yard), and installation of sod), but I feel like I could do this myself for cheaper
-I'm located in Edmonton AB, Canada.
-We haven't noticed any leaking through the foundation yet, and the windows in the side yard seem pretty high. Are window wells still recommended?

Please let me know if there's any other info I can provide that would help you all out in advising me.

Thanks! :D
Avatar for RpR
Apr 22, 2019 12:17 PM CST
Name: Dr. Demento Jr.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
Do not use topsoil.
Topsoil contains vegetative matter that will decompose and cause settling .
Compacted coarse gravel or aggregate is better as it dos not retain water and you do not want water to remain by your foundation.

Six thousand dollars, depending on exactly what they will do is, nowadays, not a bad price.
You can do it yourself but unless you have done similar work before it is harder than you think and if you find any snafus contractors, good ones, will ask you what to do and have equipment to do it.
Image
Apr 22, 2019 12:52 PM CST
Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
Forum moderator Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier Garden Ideas: Level 1
You could also have your concrete raised.
As Yogi Berra said, “It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future.”
Avatar for optimusLime
Apr 22, 2019 1:22 PM CST

crawgarden said:You could also have your concrete raised.


We considered this, but some contractors told us that there's no telling how much volume of mud you'll need to use in case there are any cavities below. Also, I've also heard re-settling can happen, so in 5 years we'll be where we are now.

Thanks for the suggestion though.
Avatar for optimusLime
Apr 23, 2019 8:59 PM CST

RpR said:Do not use topsoil.
Topsoil contains vegetative matter that will decompose and cause settling .
Compacted coarse gravel or aggregate is better as it dos not retain water and you do not want water to remain by your foundation.

Six thousand dollars, depending on exactly what they will do is, nowadays, not a bad price.
You can do it yourself but unless you have done similar work before it is harder than you think and if you find any snafus contractors, good ones, will ask you what to do and have equipment to do it.


Thanks for the reply. I spoke with my local landscape supplier and he essentially recommended the same regarding backfill material (called "road crush").
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.
Member Login:

( No account? Join now! )

Today's site banner is by JebobaTea and is called "Lacy Blue Chocolate"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.