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Defiance, ohio
ShaneTribe
May 13, 2019 3:16 PM CST
My current situation is this, last Monday I was pulling vines off of my house and they ended up being poison ivy/oak. Not even thinking anything of it I just threw the vines out in the yard and mowed over them. I am afraid now that I spread it through out the yard and am unsure what to do. It also did rain a lot since then so do you think it washed away? Do I get the entire yard sprayed? Or any other suggestions?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
May 13, 2019 3:28 PM CST
Don't roll around on your lawn until you rake up all the pieces of poison ivy.
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BigBill
May 13, 2019 4:00 PM CST
The part of poison ivy that is bad is an oil. If you mowed it, there could be a very large dispersal area.
Washing or rain won't do anything at all. The oil has to literally dry up before it is not longer a problem. With different climatic conditions, I have no idea as to just how long that might take.
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Defiance, ohio
ShaneTribe
May 13, 2019 4:09 PM CST
DaisyI said:Don't roll around on your lawn until you rake up all the pieces of poison ivy.

Didn't plan on it!
Defiance, ohio
ShaneTribe
May 13, 2019 4:11 PM CST
BigBill said:The part of poison ivy that is bad is an oil. If you mowed it, there could be a very large dispersal area.
Washing or rain won't do anything at all. The oil has to literally dry up before it is not longer a problem. With different climatic conditions, I have no idea as to just how long that might take.


That's what I was worried about. It's been raining quite a bit here over the last week. So there's been no sun or dry wether to let it dry up.Do you think I should have someone with a sprayer come spray my lawn with poison ivy/oak killer?
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Henderman
May 13, 2019 4:13 PM CST
No. Just minimize your exposure to that area of the lawn until you get a few days of dry weather.
Defiance, ohio
ShaneTribe
May 13, 2019 4:15 PM CST
Henderman said:No. Just minimize your exposure to that area of the lawn until you get a few days of dry weather.


Thanks. I got a 2 year old and a 10 month old and I'm terrified to even to them out there now.

Name: Danita
GA (Zone 7b)
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Danita
May 13, 2019 4:23 PM CST
Remember that your mower, shoes, clothing, pruning tools, gloves, etc. are covered in urushiol now, too, and need to be washed. The urushiol on surfaces and in dead plants can still cause a reaction after several years. Poison ivy/oak killer kills the plants but doesn't deactivate the urushiol. The poison ivy/oak killer will also kill your lawn grass.
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[Last edited by Danita - May 13, 2019 4:26 PM (+)]
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Defiance, ohio
ShaneTribe
May 13, 2019 4:26 PM CST
Danita said:Remember that you mower, shoes, clothing, pruning tools, gloves, etc. are covered in urushiol now, too, and need to be washed. The urushiol on surfaces and in dead plants can still cause a reaction after several years. Poison ivy/oak killer kills the plants but doesn't deactivate the urushiol. The poison ivy/oak killer will also kill your lawn grass.


Went to the hardware store. Got directed to kind that will not kill grass.

Defiance, ohio
ShaneTribe
May 13, 2019 4:37 PM CST
Danita said:Remember that your mower, shoes, clothing, pruning tools, gloves, etc. are covered in urushiol now, too, and need to be washed. The urushiol on surfaces and in dead plants can still cause a reaction after several years. Poison ivy/oak killer kills the plants but doesn't deactivate the urushiol. The poison ivy/oak killer will also kill your lawn grass.


And my mower has been sitting in my garage for a week without any use. I would think the oil may be dried up by now?
Name: Danita
GA (Zone 7b)
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Danita
May 13, 2019 4:57 PM CST
Still, the poison ivy/oak killer only kills actively growing plants that are still rooted in the ground.
It will do nothing to deactivate the urushiol that causes the allergic reaction.
Getting your "entire yard sprayed" (your words) would be useless and much more dangerous to your children's health. Remember that most herbicides are carcinogens and can cause other health problems, too. Use it only on actively growing poison ivy plants.

Drying up does nothing to deactivate the urushiol. It can still cause a reaction for years after it has dried on surfaces. Microorganisms in the soil will eventually break down the urushiol in the rotting leaves. If the dead leaves/vines remain dry, they can still cause a reaction for years.

Please read this PDF published by the army for a start on your research.
https://phc.amedd.army.mil/PHC...
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Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
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porkpal
May 13, 2019 5:04 PM CST
Not everyone is highly sensitive to poison ivy. If you or your children have never been affected up until now, you may tolerate exposure without a reaction - or not...
Porkpal
Name: Melissa
Cleveland, OH (Zone 6a)
MissySue
May 13, 2019 5:11 PM CST
Are you sure it was poison ivy or poison oak? There is a plant called Virginia Creeper that looks similar. Just have to ask the question, because I'm assuming you didn't have an allergic reaction after working with it and mowing?

Never mind.... you posted while I was answering.
[Last edited by MissySue - May 13, 2019 5:12 PM (+)]
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Defiance, ohio
ShaneTribe
May 13, 2019 5:11 PM CST
porkpal said:Not everyone is highly sensitive to poison ivy. If you or your children have never been affected up until now, you may tolerate exposure without a reaction - or not...

I got it. Face and arms. Had to go to doc.
Defiance, ohio
ShaneTribe
May 13, 2019 7:29 PM CST
Is it worth having someone with a catcher on their mower to mow the lawn? It's too tall now anyway and I definitely don't wanna rake it
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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porkpal
May 13, 2019 8:44 PM CST
That sounds like a good idea.
Porkpal
Name: Bill
VA (Zone 7a)
Riverdog17
May 22, 2019 1:19 PM CST
Poison oak/ivy has three leaves---Virginia creeper has five. Pretty easy to tell the difference.
MD (Zone 7a)
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SparklesGarden
May 22, 2019 3:45 PM CST
I'm just chiming in to agree with Danita...spraying your yard with poison seems unhelpful at best and dangerous at worst.

How large is the affected yard area?
Defiance, ohio
ShaneTribe
May 22, 2019 5:15 PM CST
SparklesGarden said:I'm just chiming in to agree with Danita...spraying your yard with poison seems unhelpful at best and dangerous at worst.

How large is the affected yard area?

It really couldn't have been that big of an area. I pulled off just a few vines that were growing on the house.
MD (Zone 7a)
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SparklesGarden
May 22, 2019 8:23 PM CST
Good. If a small yard area is affected, perhaps you can cover it with newspaper and mulch?

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