Houseplants forum: Cousin gave me some plants, need help identifying...

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Name: Cassidy McCabe
Cohoes, New York (Zone 5b)
Ribonichigo
Jun 10, 2019 8:37 PM CST
Moved to top!!
I have photos for you all today!!

Here are pictures of some of the plants my cousin gave me. I need help identifying them!

This is the first set of three, the one on the far right is definitely a Burro's tail (Sedum morganianum)
Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/e25de3 Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/d70ef0

Here is the "red jade plant" up close (which is likely a Spoon Jade, Cassula ovata)
Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/a955c8 Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/acb15e Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/cbf7c7

This is the center plant up close. Honestly have no clue what this could be. The leaves are thin and smooth.
Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/a609eb Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/2f5e00

Then this is the pot of three different plants together. There are very young Burro's tail (though you probably can't see them under the one plant) and then two others that are completely unknown to me. I swear that I've seen the pale green one in a YouTube video once but I haven't been able to find it again. The leafy one with the red underside is the one with the "sticky sap bulbs" as I've come to call them Hilarious!


Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/02c506 Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/6152a8 Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/750c25 Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/0362bb Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/ea1b0c Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/8229ca Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/0ba4f0 Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/e20324

Hopefully these are enough photos for everyone to get a good look! Thank you so much for the help!!

/// I'm trying to figure out the species of a couple plants my cousin kindly gave me. He had forgotten the names of most of them when he gave them to me, but they're all ones he propagated himself. I'm pretty sure most of these are succulents.

The first is what appears to be some sort of hanging plant. The whole plant are these beautiful little tendrils that drape over the sides of the pot. It's a very light green, almost a bluish pastel green (similar color to the donkey's tail, and resembles a string of pearls, but each "bead" are very very tiny rose-shapes leaves. Each of these "roses" are about half the size of the ladybug. Based on the leave structure it looks to me like a succulent.

Another plant has reddish-brown stems, and thin long dark green leaves, On the leaves a pale green spots. At the base are what I can only describe as "bulbs" and when examining for pests I accidentally peeled a bit of the "covering stem" and there was this clear sticky sap, similar texture and smell to aloe. It also looks like there are some very thin stems for flowers to begin growing.

Then there's a plant looks almost like a mini, red, jade plant, except for the woody stem. red on the tops of the leaves and dark green on the bottom.

The last plant is very small, the smallest of the bunch. It looks like it's in almost the same shape as my Bird-snake plant, except its a bit less "organized" in that the leaves are pointed in all different sorts of directions. Fairly thin, but firm, leaves. They are all dark green with speckles that I would compare to an aloe plant. I'm also assuming this was a succulent because when he grabbed it from his collection he had said "here are some succulents I could give you" and paired it with a donkey's tail and the "red jade plant" I described from above.

Thank you to anybody who can help me with my attempt at being very descriptive! I tried to explain it as well as I could. I will definitely get pictures up when I have my phone back!!
[Last edited by Ribonichigo - Jun 15, 2019 12:06 PM (+)]
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Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

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plantladylin
Jun 11, 2019 9:33 AM CST
I can't speculate on what your plants might be without photos because the descriptions fit numerous plants. I'll look forward to seeing your photos; I know that someone will be able to give you exact ID's once they see the pictures of your plants.
~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Jun 11, 2019 9:41 AM CST
You mentioned that your cousin gave you a "Red Jade" which might be a Crassula ovata. Here's the link to our database where you can view photos and possibly find an exact match to your Red Jade: https://garden.org/plants/sear...

I found two plants in our database with the common name of "Donkey(s) Tail, do either of these look like your plant?:
Burro's Tail (Sedum morganianum)
Donkey Tail (Euphorbia myrsinites)
~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Name: Cassidy McCabe
Cohoes, New York (Zone 5b)
Ribonichigo
Jun 12, 2019 9:03 AM CST
Yes from the two links you provided two of my plants are definitely a Spoon Jade (Crassula ovata), and the other is the Sedum morganianum.

My phone should be back in my hands tomorrow so I'll get some pictures then!!

Name: Cassidy McCabe
Cohoes, New York (Zone 5b)
Ribonichigo
Jun 15, 2019 12:05 PM CST
I have photos for you all today!!

Here are pictures of some of the plants my cousin gave me. I need help identifying them!

This is the first set of three, the one on the far right is definitely a Burro's tail (Sedum morganianum)
Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/e25de3 Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/d70ef0

Here is the "red jade plant" up close (which is likely a Spoon Jade, Cassula ovata)
Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/a955c8 Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/acb15e Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/cbf7c7

This is the center plant up close. Honestly have no clue what this could be. The leaves are thin and smooth.
Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/a609eb Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/2f5e00

Then this is the pot of three different plants together. There are very young Burro's tail (though you probably can't see them under the one plant) and then two others that are completely unknown to me. I swear that I've seen the pale green one in a YouTube video once but I haven't been able to find it again. The leafy one with the red underside is the one with the "sticky sap bulbs" as I've come to call them Hilarious!


Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/02c506 Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/6152a8 Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/750c25 Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/0362bb Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/ea1b0c Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/8229ca Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/0ba4f0 Thumb of 2019-06-15/Ribonichigo/e20324

Hopefully these are enough photos for everyone to get a good look! Thank you so much for the help!!

[Last edited by Ribonichigo - Jun 15, 2019 12:05 PM (+)]
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Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Jun 15, 2019 12:20 PM CST
One of your plants reminds me of Silver Squill (Ledebouria socialis)

~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Jun 15, 2019 12:21 PM CST
The third plant in the first pic is not Sedum morganianum, which has its leaves much closer together along the stem, which is green. I cannot say what it would be.



The first plant in that same pic is likely not Crassula ovata, which has bigger, thicker, greener leaves.



The second plant looks like a Gasteria.

And yes, the big plant with the spotted leaves is Ledebouria socialis.

Silver Squill (Ledebouria socialis)
Name: Cassidy McCabe
Cohoes, New York (Zone 5b)
Ribonichigo
Jun 16, 2019 7:50 AM CST
Baja_Costero said:The first plant in that same pic is likely not Crassula ovata, which has bigger, thicker, greener leaves.



I think the type of Crassula ovata is different than the one you're referring to. I was looking at this one, which looks much more like the plant.

Spoon Jade (Crassula ovata 'Hobbit')

Also thanks for letting me know the one that I believed was a burro's tail is definitely not! I'll have to dig a little more lol

And than you for letting me discover the big one in the "combo pot"!
[Last edited by Ribonichigo - Jun 16, 2019 7:55 AM (+)]
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Jun 16, 2019 10:30 AM CST
It is not "Hobbit" either... "Hobbit" has monstrose leaves that are curled on themselves and not flat like yours are.

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Hamwild
Jun 16, 2019 11:36 AM CST
Is Crassula ovata variable? I used to have one that I thought was C. ovata, but the leaves were all rather small and round. I haven't been able to find another one just like that, but I've seen different shades of green, shapes, and sizes, in the leaves of what I thought were C. ovata.
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Jun 16, 2019 12:43 PM CST
I agree that is not a Sedum morganianum...but another type of Sedum. I think I have something similar, and it is a Sedum dasyphyllum minor. Your plant is just too overgrown and may have suffered poor light and made too dry so it is quite etiolated and overgrown.

The second plant in the trio looks like a very dried out Gasteria, could be Gasteria 'Little Warty'.

I agree with the Ledobouria socialis id and the Crassula ovata id on the other plants there.

I would highly recommend you water very well right now all your plants. They are all too dried out.
Though the succulents need to grow in a fast draining media, do not grow them like desert cacti. They actually love good watering and spritzing when conditions are way too dry during summer. I find Sedums prefer filtered light during summer. so if you can hopefully your window has sheer white curtains in case that is a south facing window. In all other parts of the year, the south facing window is okay, but during summer, help them with some sheer curtains.
Name: Cassidy McCabe
Cohoes, New York (Zone 5b)
Ribonichigo
Jun 16, 2019 9:43 PM CST
I've been watering them whenever the soil feels dry, the pots are just old cause they're from my cousin, my guess is that they've been reused several times. The window I have the trio in front of is a west-facing window and the one with the Ledobouria in it is an east-facing window. I actually ended up watering them all just after these photos were taken.

Looking at several Gasteria pictures I don't believe it's a Gasteria.... the leaves are very smooth and thin compared to how the pictures look that I'm seeing in the database. I'll try to get better pictures of it tomorrow if I can.

The trio were freshly propagated, my guess is the Sedum was a cutting, which is why it looks the way it does. (I'm not that knowledgeable on propagating, but he informed me that they had very recently started growing roots and that's why he's giving them to me so I can start with "baby succulents").
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Hamwild
Jun 17, 2019 4:49 AM CST
IMHO, it looks like a Gasteria. It looks a bit dehydrated. I had one that was small like yours. It wasn't a very common one I don't think, as I haven't been able to find it again.
Georgia (Zone 8a)
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Hamwild
Jun 17, 2019 4:51 AM CST
It reminds me of one of the smaller Gasteria, like this one:

Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Jun 17, 2019 11:29 AM CST
Yes, some Gasterias have rough texture and some with smooth texture. I even have to rethink now how to water mine. Before, I do a lot of watering intervals even during the dry season. I realize now, it likes more frequent watering here on my side at this time of the year since our humidity is way too low, and our temps too hot.

Ribonichigo, the leaves of your Gasteria needs to be a little more plump looking than that, so watering it a bit more frequently during this summer period will help it. The container is so small anyways, so root zone area will dry out fast and it seems media is gritty enough too.

Eventually if you want that plant to grow bigger, you can increase container size so there is more wiggle room for the roots. Not too big right away, and not too deep either. Wide mouth and shallow is better.

I will show you a couple of my Gasterias, just to give you an idea how a Gasteria typically grows. My Gasterias are grown outdoors year round, our winters are mild, no snow, but it gets rainy here, so media has to be very gritty. You can see why I say your plant is quite dehydrated. When it receives enough moisture it needs, the leaves are quite plump and thick.
Gasteria 'Little Warty'
22 Oct 2016 with a new pup on the side:
Thumb of 2019-06-17/tarev/bb5f13
with blooms the following Spring:
Thumb of 2019-06-17/tarev/eb973a

Fast forward 2019
Feb 2019, the pups have grown bigger, making a nice clump
Thumb of 2019-06-17/tarev/128dd8
April 2019 in bloom
Thumb of 2019-06-17/tarev/2d8c0d Thumb of 2019-06-17/tarev/b18951

Gasteria glomerata:
Initial acquisituon 30April 2017
Thumb of 2019-06-17/tarev/22722f

Fast forward 2019
April 2019
Thumb of 2019-06-17/tarev/6fb6ab Thumb of 2019-06-17/tarev/2ba8ee
May 2019 seeing new pups on the side
Thumb of 2019-06-17/tarev/7a2279

Of course your location is different than mine, so I want you to consider giving your plants a good time outdoors during this time of the year and just move them back in during late Fall to acclimate once again to indoor growing in time for winter.
Name: Cassidy McCabe
Cohoes, New York (Zone 5b)
Ribonichigo
Jun 18, 2019 10:59 PM CST
Alright, thank you for all the help! The other pictures definitely look like my little guy! Sorry for doubting it before

Sadly I don't have the outdoor space to keep plants outdoors (I live on the second floor of an apartment), and the New York weather has been generally all over the place (yesterday was in the 80s, today average temp of 50, tomorrow expected to rain in the 70's, and then back down to 50), so I probably wouldn't even consider the idea. But since I'm on the second floor and I've lately been keeping my house a temperature suitable for my plants (doing a quick search whenever I've gotten a new plant I found a happy medium for everyone is between 75 and 80 degrees).

I'll be sure to porbably water my succulents more frequently, I've just assumed that I only need to water once every few weeks, and in practice I've been doing it a bit more frequently, more like once every week and a half or so, since I just check the soil, and if it's dry I leave it one more day then water.

In the meantime, I'm still stuck on the plant that's with the Silver Squill... anyone have any clue what it could be?
[Last edited by Ribonichigo - Jun 18, 2019 11:00 PM (+)]
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Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Jun 19, 2019 10:43 AM CST
@valleylynn, hope you see this thread, I think you may be able to help id that sedum growing with the silver squill.
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Stay Home-Save Lives-Wear a Mask!
Cat Lover Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Region: California Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
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tarev
Jun 19, 2019 10:51 AM CST
Ribonichigo said:Alright, thank you for all the help! The other pictures definitely look like my little guy! Sorry for doubting it before

Sadly I don't have the outdoor space to keep plants outdoors (I live on the second floor of an apartment), and the New York weather has been generally all over the place (yesterday was in the 80s, today average temp of 50, tomorrow expected to rain in the 70's, and then back down to 50), so I probably wouldn't even consider the idea. But since I'm on the second floor and I've lately been keeping my house a temperature suitable for my plants (doing a quick search whenever I've gotten a new plant I found a happy medium for everyone is between 75 and 80 degrees).

I'll be sure to porbably water my succulents more frequently, I've just assumed that I only need to water once every few weeks, and in practice I've been doing it a bit more frequently, more like once every week and a half or so, since I just check the soil, and if it's dry I leave it one more day then water.

In the meantime, I'm still stuck on the plant that's with the Silver Squill... anyone have any clue what it could be?


You can safely do once a week thorough watering, seeing the water drain away and leave them be during summer while indoors. You can even run your ceiling fan just to make the air go around some more. When the seasons change, when it starts getting much cooler and light levels much shorter, then you do much longer watering intervals.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
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WillC
Jun 19, 2019 3:03 PM CST
The available light in 2d floor apartments is pretty limited in NYC. That is your biggest environmental problem for your light-loving succulents. Normal home temps are not a problem. Keep temps comfortable for the human inhabitants and your plants will be fine!
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Name: Lynn
Dallas, OR (Zone 8b)
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valleylynn
Jun 19, 2019 5:04 PM CST
Hi all, late to the party.
The sedum with the squill does look like it could be S. dasyphyllum gone wild. Probably because it is not considered an indoor type of sedum, so is stretching for more light.
Here is one grown in an outdoor environment.

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