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Jul 22, 2019 12:33 PM CST
Toronto, Ontario
Region: Canadian Daylilies Dragonflies
Hello! Yesterday while working in the yard I noticed a vine hanging from a old lilac bush (tree). It's at the back of the yard near the intersection of four yards, and in the many years I've lived here, this is the first time I've seen it. Usually it's grapevine that I'm pulling off this lilac.

Any thoughts on what it is?
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Jul 22, 2019 12:42 PM CST
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Region: Ukraine Region: Florida Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Last edited by plantladylin Jul 22, 2019 12:47 PM Icon for preview
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Jul 22, 2019 12:56 PM CST
Toronto, Ontario
Region: Canadian Daylilies Dragonflies
Thank you! Is Virginia Creeper as invasive as grapevine or honeysuckle? I'm sure the leaves in the fall will be pretty, but I'd rather it didn't attach itself to the neighbouring blue spruce.
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Jul 22, 2019 1:22 PM CST
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Birds
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I'd say it's invasive. A nice native in the right locations I think.
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Jul 22, 2019 1:36 PM CST
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Region: Ukraine Region: Florida Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener Houseplants
We have it traveling along the ground and growing up oaks and maples in our yard and it does have a tendency to be a problem vine. Years ago we had it covering a part of the yard at our rental property. Our tenants let it cover a chain link fence for privacy which was fine but we told them not to let it get to the house ... well, my husband had to go fix something with the irrigation system one time and he found they'd let that vine grow across the fence, completely covering the gate on that side of the house (so much so that the gate was impossible to open and the vines had attached to and climbed up the side of the house where it was scrambling along the roof! He had to spend a few hours yanking it down and thankfully it didn't cause any damage but from then on, we had to make sure the tenants kept it away from the side of the house.

I'm not all that familiar with Colorado Blue Spruce (Picea pungens) but I know they get to be very large trees. I don't know whether Parthenocissus would harm them but I don't think I'd want those vines covering that beautiful tree.
~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


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Jul 22, 2019 4:22 PM CST
Toronto, Ontario
Region: Canadian Daylilies Dragonflies
That sounds like a lot of cleanup work! I'm happy to say I found the source. Clearly I don't spend enough time in this corner of the yard. The Virginia Creeper is originating in the yard behind ours, in the back corner in a triangular space behind a storage shed.

So far it looks like it's just on the lilac, but I'll keep an eye on it -- unlike the wisteria which has just latched on to the same spruce on its opposite side. At least I know now how to limit its growth if I need to.

I discovered this forum when looking to see how to identify the vine. However, I can see there is so much to learn from it and so many photos to drool over.

Thanks again!
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Jul 22, 2019 4:29 PM CST
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Birds
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Oh my, wisteria is one of those beauties, but I'd be afraid to have one myself. My parents made the mistake of putting them next to the house and they started pulling the attic vents up from the soffit!
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Jul 22, 2019 4:44 PM CST
Toronto, Ontario
Region: Canadian Daylilies Dragonflies
Yes, each year my husband has to remove the wisteria from the downspout on the right side of the back of the house and the arctic kiwi from the downspout on the left side. It keeps him busy!
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Jul 22, 2019 4:53 PM CST
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Region: Ukraine Region: Florida Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener Houseplants
Kasie23, I forgot to say hi and :welcome:

You will love it here ... a great bunch of friendly and helpful gardeners! I've been around here a long while and I'm still learning stuff from some wonderful people!

Hamwild, Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis) is the one that can be extremely invasive. The native American Wisteria (Wisteria frutescens) is one everyone should grow instead because it doesn't have the invasive tendencies as the W. sinensis.

At our old house, we had a lot of sun and I grew the native American Wisteria (Wisteria frutescens 'Amethyst Falls') I wish we had enough sun at our current home but unfortunately our property is heavily shaded with very little sun.
~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


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Jul 22, 2019 4:57 PM CST
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Birds
Hummingbirder Butterflies Bee Lover Garden Art
plantladylin said:Kasie23, I forgot to say hi and :welcome:

You will love it here ... a great bunch of friendly and helpful gardeners! I've been around here a long while and I'm still learning stuff from some wonderful people!

Hamwild, Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis) is the one that can be extremely invasive. The native American Wisteria (Wisteria frutescens) is one everyone should grow instead because it doesn't have the invasive tendencies as the W. sinensis.

At our old house, we had a lot of sun and I grew the native American Wisteria (Wisteria frutescens 'Amethyst Falls') I wish we had enough sun at our current home but unfortunately our property is heavily shaded with very little sun.


Oooh, I bet my parents had the wrong one.
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Jul 22, 2019 6:45 PM CST
Toronto, Ontario
Region: Canadian Daylilies Dragonflies
Thank you for your welcome and also the link to the wisterias. The American variety (correct word?) is more like the one we had in our house in New Jersey when I was a kid. The flowers always reminded me of grapes. And it definitely didn't take over the part of the yard where it grew.

One of the seed pods from our current wisteria must have landed in the middle garden, because we now have several youngish ones grouped together for another planting. It's this second planting that's latched onto the spruce, a connection that we will have to break soon.
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