Plant ID forum: Tree identification question

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Akron, Ohio
TreeGrower123
Jul 26, 2019 9:50 AM CST
Hey garden gurus I planted these trees and thought they were Japanese Maples their leaves don't look like it to me now that they are coming off the top. What do you guys think? Am I mistaken that they are Japanese maples or will the appearance of the leaves changes as they get older? Thank guys!
Thumb of 2019-07-26/TreeGrower123/186aea

Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jul 26, 2019 10:53 AM CST
They look like maples but not necessarily Japanese maples. The leaves will change as the trees mature. Where did you get the seed? If you gathered them with the 'wing' still attached, Japanese maples seeds are always smaller than other maples seeds.
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Akron, Ohio
TreeGrower123
Jul 26, 2019 11:00 AM CST
So I gathered all the seeds from around a Japanese maple that were on the ground, there were like 100s of them and then I even transplanted some of the little sprouting trees nearby before they were cut down by the lawn mower (the transplant is the one in the photo (the bigger one) and the grown from seed one is the smaller one next to it). I didn't think there were really any other nearby maple tree aside from the Japanese maple? Idk very strange
Name: Deb
Planet Earth (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest
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Bonehead
Jul 26, 2019 11:06 AM CST
I believe most J. maples won't come true from seed. You may get an interesting tree, or you may get a plain jane. I'd go ahead and let it grow for a few seasons to see how it shapes up. Take photos in spring, summer, and fall to observe how it might change colors. Good luck.
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jul 26, 2019 11:08 AM CST
Then they are Japanese maples. What did the parent tree look like?

The problem with growing anything from seed, especially something as hybridized as a Japanese maple, is you have a lot of ancestral genetics coming into play. The best way to find a good maple when growing from seed is to plant lots of them and throw out the ones that don't meet your expectations. Its easier to let Mother Nature grow all the seeds and pick out the ones whose leaves are different and transplant them before the lawnmower eats them.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Jul 26, 2019 11:33 AM CST
I'll move this over to the Plant Identification Forum where it will get more views. Smiling
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~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jul 26, 2019 11:45 AM CST
Bonehead said:I believe most J. maples won't come true from seed. You may get an interesting tree, or you may get a plain jane. I'd go ahead and let it grow for a few seasons to see how it shapes up. Take photos in spring, summer, and fall to observe how it might change colors. Good luck.


The first true leaves say a lot about what the mature trees will look like. So far, I would guess Plain Janes.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
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ViburnumValley
Jul 27, 2019 9:13 AM CST
Count me among the most skeptical of this account so far.

That one (!) image is not anything like an Acer palmatum - if that is the Japanese Maple to which everyone is referring. I suspect if the original poster is growing a lot of seedlings, then more pictures might be forthcoming. If some did not germinate, there may be evidence to show off what the seed/samara looks like.

Finally: what about the parent tree under which all this seed was collected? Show us that plant (WHOLE plant, and then progressively finer details) and the general vicinity of where it is growing. If one was concentrating on picking up copious seed, one may not have been paying attention to plants/trees growing in the vicinity.

What time of year did you collect the seed? That is a very good way to make some determinations, since different maple species mature and drop seeds at quite different times of year - in addition to the previously mentioned size of seed/wings AND angle at which the pairs of wings are positioned.

If no other information was to emerge, I'd categorically state that is NOT an Acer palmatum, but possibly some other species like Acer rubrum or one of the less deeply lobed Asian maples like Acer ginnala..
John
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
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plantladylin
Jul 27, 2019 10:08 AM CST
Here are our database entries for the two that John suggested:
Red Maple (Acer rubrum)
Amur Maple (Acer tataricum subsp. ginnala) (synonym Acer ginnala)
~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Akron, Ohio
TreeGrower123
Jul 27, 2019 2:14 PM CST
so yea to answer some of the questions, I grabbed the seeds back in April the weather was really wet and cold almost like fall, in Ohio our seasons can be interesting. Regarding the seeds all I remember of them was they had a wing, they were red and I would considered them pretty small. I stuck seeds in fridge and noticed a couple month later when I was moving stuff around that they were starting to sprout so I planted them in some little containers. The bigger trees were sprouting in June near the japanese maple and I plucked some out and transplanted them. I know for a certain the tree that all the seeds were near and the sprouting tree were near was a japanese maple because I grabbed them from my father's house when I was helping him on some projects and I was the one who bought and planted the tree for him many years ago. I am thinking maybe one of the neighbors has one of those other trees and it dumped a bunch of those seeds, I will have to investigate next time I am over his house. All in all they are growing pretty well and look nice just differently from what I initially thought it was. thanks for the help this forum is very informative.

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