Roses forum→Rose care

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Louisville ky
ssilvern
Aug 6, 2019 2:40 PM CST
I have a couple of questions..

What is better to use rose tone or bayer 3 in 1 care OR can they be used together?

My rose leaves are turning yellow.. Should I apply iron tone?

My rose leaves are also getting black spots with a black powdery substance. Is neem oil sufficient to remedy this problem?

Is it ok to water roses at night?

Thanks shereen
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Name: Carol
Alberta, Canada (Zone 3b)
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Canadian_Rose
Aug 7, 2019 3:22 AM CST
Hello Shereen Welcome! I can't answer all of your questions, because my roses don't get blackspot here...and I garden organically...so I don't spray. As to the leaves turning yellow. Can you post a picture? Yellowing leaves with green veins could indicate that they need iron. If they're all over yellow...it could mean they're old leaves or that they're either under or over watered. Do you fertilize your roses?
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
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seilMI
Aug 7, 2019 9:50 AM CST
Rose Tone and the 3 in 1 product are two different things. Rose tone is an organic rose fertilizer The Bayer 3 in 1 is a fertilizer, insecticide and fungicide combination product. I never recommend using that because you don't usually need all three at the sane time. They are weakened versions of all three combined to make it easier but they are less effective as a result. If you need fertilizer use a good one so you can control the amount your roses are getting, If you have a bug infestation, identify the specific bug you have and use an insecticide meant for that bug. If you have a fungal disease, same thing, ID it and use the right fungicide for that disease. You'll have much better results.

Without pictures of the leaves we can't attempt a diagnosis. Yellowing leaves are a symptom of many things but how they are yellowing makes a difference.

Be EXTREMELY careful using any type of oil on your roses. Oils will burn your roses in high heat and sun conditions. Neem oil is best used in the fall, winter and early spring. The height of summer is the worst time to use it.

It is not recommend to water at night. Wet leaves during the cooler night hours can lead to fungal diseases. It is preferred to water in the early morning so the leaves will have plenty of time to dry off before it cools and gets dark. However, if night time is the only time you can water, do it. It is more important that the roses get sufficient water, no matter the time of day.

SW Ohio River Valley (Zone 6b)
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vaporvac
Aug 7, 2019 10:19 AM CST
I've often wondered why watering at night would be a problem if it's not overhead watering.In fact, one might think nighttime watering would be less wasteful. Just a thought. Confused
Coastal Southern California (Zone 13a)
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jerijen
Aug 11, 2019 1:58 PM CST
WHAT SEIL SAID!!!
(ALL of it.)

And let me add to the question of oils that I have had rose foliage burn to a crisp in summer temperatures of 75 deg. or less. Which is why we quit using that.

Photos of the "sick" leaves would be helpful. Without it, any attempt at diagnosis would be worse than unhelpful.
Name: Jim
Central Pa. (Zone 6a)
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jim1961
Aug 11, 2019 3:29 PM CST
vaporvac said:I've often wondered why watering at night would be a problem if it's not overhead watering.In fact, one might think nighttime watering would be less wasteful. Just a thought. Confused


Probably nothing wrong with watering at night as long you do not get the rose leaves wet...

BUT my thoughts are water is needed more doing the hottest parts of the day...So watering in the morning makes more sense to me...But I do it both ways...lol

Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
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seilMI
Aug 11, 2019 6:17 PM CST
I agree, Jim. On very hot, sunny days I often shower my roses with the hose to cool them off. I swear I can hear them sigh with relief, lol!

There's a lot of controversy about watering during the day and watering the leaves. I'm of the opinion that the leaves need the water too. They do absorb water through the leaves. And a good rinsing will help keep the leaves clean so they can do their job better. There is even some thought that washing off the leaves can cut down on diseases because it washes the spores off. But what ever time you can water the important thing is to do it! Watering properly is the MOST important thing you can do to keep your roses healthy. All the primping and fussing and fancy applications won't do diddly if the rose isn't getting enough water.
Name: David Tillyer
New York City (Zone 7b)
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BigAppleRoseGuy
Aug 12, 2019 8:02 AM CST
If you have a lot of roses pretty close together and don't prune them assiduously (like some people I know), watering the leaves can be deadly.
David
Name: Arturo Tarak
Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentin (Zone 8a)
Roses Dahlias Irises Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
hampartsum
Aug 12, 2019 8:32 AM CST
BigAppleRoseGuy said:If you have a lot of roses pretty close together and don't prune them assiduously (like some people I know), watering the leaves can be deadly.
David

Yes, I learn't that the hard way...
in MY conditions I ought NEVER to water from above. It only cause BS become widespread....HERE. Now having said this deliberately with capital letters, do I follow it always? No.... Smiling What I don't do, let a sprinkler rotate hours long over my roses. However if I need to wash down aphids with a strong flow of water I do it early in the morning letting the leaves get dry by noon. I choose a sunny day for that. What I don't want to develop is a stagnant humid microclimate around my rose leaves. Here comes in the wind factor. A slight wind/breeze, which is common here, will dry up leaves in a matter of minutes in our mid summer bone dry season. Not so early spring or mid fall onwards. Here's where evaptranspiration rates have something to say... Sighing! . What does all this explanation sum up to?. Well one may ( *Blush* ) have initial concepts to contend with, but has to observe all factors in any given moment and decide...
@MargieNY said not long ago: observe,observe,observe....
and only then decide. My I tip my hat to you. to her.
Arturo
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
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seilMI
Aug 12, 2019 1:47 PM CST
True, Arturo! As Jeri often says, location, location, location!
Name: Jim
Central Pa. (Zone 6a)
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jim1961
Aug 13, 2019 3:55 PM CST
We have years where it just rains, rains, rains and we have heavy nightly dews which wet rose leaves... So I only grow roses that will do ok in those conditions without spraying...Trial and error...
Name: David Tillyer
New York City (Zone 7b)
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BigAppleRoseGuy
Aug 13, 2019 8:44 PM CST
You're right, Jim.
This year is a good example. We have had more rain this year than I've seen in decades. I've also had more damned black spot than I've had.
I think my trial and error will be that I'll go through the garden looking for plants with yellow leaves and black spots and I'll just yank them
and start again next year.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
Aug 13, 2019 9:30 PM CST
No second chance?
Porkpal
Name: David Tillyer
New York City (Zone 7b)
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BigAppleRoseGuy
Aug 14, 2019 7:02 AM CST
Well, maybe.
Name: Arturo Tarak
Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentin (Zone 8a)
Roses Dahlias Irises Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
hampartsum
Aug 14, 2019 8:45 AM CST
jim1961 said:We have years where it just rains, rains, rains and we have heavy nightly dews which wet rose leaves... So I only grow roses that will do ok in those conditions without spraying...Trial and error...


This winter is just that....Will it be the same later on?. Confused . Now all the extra rains only provide for the aquifers. Well replete is a wonderful way to start growing season which is around the corner and...
me way behind with all my marathons that should've have started way before... D'Oh!
Surprisingly I look at it and still smile.... Rolling my eyes.
I honestly think I should sign into the Mental hospital soon... Smiling Is there a happy fools quarter there? If so I already qualify for it... nodding Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing
Arturo
Name: Carol
Alberta, Canada (Zone 3b)
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Canadian_Rose
Aug 14, 2019 10:20 AM CST
Arturo .... Rolling on the floor laughing I love your sense of humor!! Hilarious!
Name: Critter (Jill)
Frederick, MD (Zone 6b)
We're all learners, doers, teachers
Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Critters Allowed Butterflies Hummingbirder Cat Lover
Bee Lover Region: Mid-Atlantic Cottage Gardener Garden Photography Tropicals Hibiscus
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critterologist
Oct 9, 2019 9:02 AM CST
Do any of you feed your roses roots over the winter? Not something high in nitrogen, obviously... I was doing a good job of feeding MIL's roses until August, now wondering if I should give them a treat to make up for my neglect or if that's a bad idea. I think I'll prune hers back, also, as that's what they always did in NC. Mine are shrubs & floribundas & climbers, so I'll prune off anything weak or damaged but leave most of the rest of it.
I'm learning to dance in the rain. Thank you, Sally & Chris & Sharon.
SW Ohio River Valley (Zone 6b)
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vaporvac
Oct 9, 2019 1:53 PM CST
I don't, but I'm sure you could amend with organics at anytime of the year. In my zone, I don't fall prune as I want as much live cane going into the winter as possible to make up for any die-back I may have. Of course, If somethings broken perhaps a clean cut would help keep out disease.
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
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seilMI
Oct 9, 2019 2:06 PM CST
I don't fertilize during the winter but I do use organics right up to dormancy. Anything good for the soil is good for the rose. I agree with Vaporvaxc, no pruning in fall except for dead wood or damaged canes. Otherwise just leave it alone until early spring when you can see what you have left after winter.
Name: David Tillyer
New York City (Zone 7b)
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BigAppleRoseGuy
Oct 9, 2019 8:56 PM CST
I guess it is clear that in the northern states (US), it makes sense to pass on pruning after September or so. I find it hard wondering through the garden and seeing what I should shape or just whack off, but I stop myself everyday.

On the other hand, I have a two-inch layer of nice double-shredded tree mulch that I put down in the late spring. I've been stirring it and bothering it to allow proper drainage, but I don't intend to put any more down until next spring. The Parks Department would love to dump a ton (literally) of mulch in front of my garden for me to spread around, but I don't think that would be prudent. What's the general wisdom about that?
David

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