Roses forum→Gardeners' World Picks

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Name: David Tillyer
New York City (Zone 7b)
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BigAppleRoseGuy
Aug 8, 2019 11:48 AM CST
Hi folks.
Gardeners' World has just listed six roses which "are trouble-free and disease resistant, ensuring you have a beautiful display without having to worry about disease." They list Rosas Charles de Mills, Thomas a' Becket, Mortimer Sackler, Roseraie de L'Hay, Boscobel, and Lady of Shalott. Do any of these have strong support on this list?

I have to admit that I could not have a rose named Mortimer Sackler in my garden, considering the Sackler family is responsible for such terrible prescription drug abuse over the past few years. OK, OK, it would be hard to avoid the evil doers among rose names.
What's a gardener to do? Smiling David
Name: Rosemary
Sacramento, CA (Zone 9b)
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reh0622
Aug 8, 2019 12:12 PM CST
I remember I called a privately-owned local rose nursery several years ago (now closed) and told them I was interested in purchasing Charles de Mills, and they sounded like, why would I want that rose, when there are so many better ones?!. I never got it, and I'm still interested in it.

What do you do about a name you don't like? Privately change the name to one you do like! Green Grin!
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses Clematis Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages Forum moderator Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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zuzu
Aug 8, 2019 2:02 PM CST

Moderator

Charles de Mills would be the wrong rose for your garden, Rosemary, because it's a Gallica. They won't bloom reliably without a colder winter than you have in zone 9b. Even in 9a, I have to dump trays of ice cubes around my Gallicas in winter to ensure spring blooms.

It also has another problem common to Gallica roses: It will run rampant through your garden unless it's grafted. On its own roots, it will send out horizontal canes in all directions, which take root wherever they touch the ground.

David, I haven't grown Thomas a Becket or Roseraie de l'Hay, and I've found Boscobel and Lady of Shalott to be weaker and less vigorous than many other Austins, but Mortimer Sackler is a joy to grow. It's one of those roses that can simply be planted and then left alone to grow and flourish. In my garden it's a tall and wide rose bush, highly resistant to pests and diseases. It's almost thornless, and the blooms don't have the "nodding" habit of so many other Austins.

I can see how the OxyContin connection could put you off the name of the rose. The Austin Company is currently having the same problem marketing Roald Dahl because of the anti-Semitism with which he was associated in the past.
Name: Rosemary
Sacramento, CA (Zone 9b)
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reh0622
Aug 8, 2019 2:17 PM CST
Thank you for the info on Charles de Mills, zuzu.

An idea, David: Mortimer Sackler looks like a beautiful rose that would be visible in a garden at night. If one is turned off by it's association because of a commercial name it happened to be given in the past, how about just going by the cultiver name, AUSorts, and then if you wanted, nicknaming it something befitting it, like Moonlight Sonata, the M and S taken from the original commercial name, That's something I would probably do!
Name: David Tillyer
New York City (Zone 7b)
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BigAppleRoseGuy
Aug 8, 2019 2:22 PM CST
Hi Zuzu,
I wonder if Gardener's World was saying that these roses are strong and vigorous "particularly in UK weather".
I read that Mortimer Sackler's wife bought naming rights at an auction in aid of some charity.
I still can't see myself telling admirers that stop by the garden, "Oh, yes, that's my new Mortimer
Sackler." Smiling
David
Name: David Tillyer
New York City (Zone 7b)
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BigAppleRoseGuy
Aug 8, 2019 2:31 PM CST
Hi Rosemary.
What a good idea. Moonlight Sonata is one of my favorite pieces of music.
I did a cursory search and, apparently, there is no rose called "Moonlight
Sonata". I wonder why.
David
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses Clematis Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages Forum moderator Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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zuzu
Aug 8, 2019 2:33 PM CST

Moderator

It is possible that the information applies to the UK.

As for the Mortimer Sackler rose, it's true that the naming rights were bought at a charity auction, which takes some of the onus off the name, I suppose. At least we know that Sackler isn't getting a percentage of the royalties. Too bad the rose doesn't have any of the alternative names so many other roses have. I called my 'Rosie O'Donnell' rose 'New Era,' another of its names, for many years. Then I decided that Rosie's not so bad and started calling the rose 'Rosie O'Donnell' again.
Name: SoCal
Orange County (Zone 10a)
Lazy Gardener or Melonator
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SoCalGardenNut
Aug 8, 2019 2:36 PM CST
Oh, no. I did order a Charles de Mills. I must put it in container.
I try to grow everything, sometime not successful.
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
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seilMI
Aug 8, 2019 5:03 PM CST
Knowing that Gardener's World is out of the UK explains why 4 of them are Austin's. I don't have these particular four but the four I do have are pretty much disease magnets for me!
Coastal Southern California (Zone 13a)
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jerijen
Aug 8, 2019 5:25 PM CST
Zuzu's right.

Charles de Mills is a great rose . . . but if you live in a warm-climate area, with little or no winter chill, it will be a TERRIBLE rose for you.

SoCal GardenNut -- It may bloom for you for a year or two, but they really demand winter chill.

Roseraie de L'Hay is a great rose . . . somewhere. But that somewhere is not here, where both soil and water are highly alkaline. This is where Rugosa roses (such as Roseraie de L'Hay) go to die.

I have grown many of David Austin's roses, and some of them have been good here -- and some of them have been disease-ridden trash. Every Austin I have ever grown has higher water requirements than most of the roses we grow. For that reason, we grow few of them, because drought conditions are in effect here, most of the time.

I really bless the memory of the late Bob Edberg (of Limberlost Roses, and Limberlost Rose Books) who finally taught me that to succeed, I needed to look for roses that were at the least, TOLERANT of my conditions.

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