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Aug 26, 2019 3:07 PM CST
Southern Indiana (Zone 6a)
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I just came back from my local nursery with these tiny, 1-inch plants. I mean the pot is an inch, the plants are slightly larger. I recognized one as an alocasia, but I'm not sure what kind. I was told the first was philodendron prince of orange, but since they're uncommon, I was a bit skeptical. Does this look like a baby prince of orange?

I didn't want to put this in the ID forum since I sort of know what they are, but confirmation would be appreciated. My main reason for posting this, is because these are the first houseplants I've bought, that are out of the "easy" care zone. I'm not exactly sure how to care for them, so any advice would be great! Thanks in advance! Thank You!

Thumb of 2019-08-26/CrazedHoosier/c1265c
Thumb of 2019-08-26/CrazedHoosier/56aa61
Maybe we should get a second opinion...
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Aug 26, 2019 3:13 PM CST
Name: Gene Staver
Portage WI 53901 (Zone 5a)
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They do look as described.
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Aug 26, 2019 3:36 PM CST
Southern Indiana (Zone 6a)
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gasrocks said:They do look as described.


That's great news! Since they're are so tiny, do you think I can expect a lot of growth?

Any guesses on the type of alocasia?
Maybe we should get a second opinion...
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Aug 27, 2019 5:19 AM CST
Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 38 years
Aroids Region: Florida Tropicals
The alocasia is very juvenile, but my best guess is that it will turn into this, A. 'Poly'.
Thumb of 2019-08-27/Gina1960/d80f6f

The Philo could be one of three...P. 'Prince of Orange', P. 'Autumn', or P. 'Moonlight'
The hybrids can take a while to show the true color on the leaves. I have Prince of Orange, if it started looking like this, its P of O
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Aug 27, 2019 8:52 AM CST
Southern Indiana (Zone 6a)
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Gina1960 said:The alocasia is very juvenile, but my best guess is that it will turn into this, A. 'Poly'.
Thumb of 2019-08-27/Gina1960/d80f6f

The Philo could be one of three...P. 'Prince of Orange', P. 'Autumn', or P. 'Moonlight'
The hybrids can take a while to show the true color on the leaves. I have Prince of Orange, if it started looking like this, its P of O
Thumb of 2019-08-27/Gina1960/42ccbf



Both of these plants are stunning! I really hope the philodendron turns out to be prince of orange, as I am completely in love with that tropical orange and green look. My local nursery labeled a much larger specimen as prince of orange, but the freshly emerged leaves were red. Confused As long as I didn't get a pink Congo, I'm fine!

I thought it may be alocasia Polly, but I'm totally new to alocasia. I'm hoping to add mine into a little goldfish bowl with a maidenhair fern and rex begonia, as they all like moisture and high humidity. I just hope the alocasia won't outgrow the bowl in a matter of months.

Are these both your plants? If so, can you give me some tips and tricks for their care? I'd absolutely love to not accidentally kill one! Hilarious!
Maybe we should get a second opinion...
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Aug 27, 2019 9:48 AM CST
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Hybrids like your Philodendron can be somewhat unpredictable as they sometimes revert to one of the parent species plants. But it will probably be fine.

Alocasias do grow quite tall as they mature so it may soon outgrow your fishbowl. It can survive in low humidity as long as the soil is properly watered. Your Philodendron grows more slowly and not nearly as tall as the Alocasia. It might be a better choice for your fishbowl.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at wcreed@HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
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Aug 27, 2019 10:11 AM CST
Southern Indiana (Zone 6a)
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WillC said:Hybrids like your Philodendron can be somewhat unpredictable as they sometimes revert to one of the parent species plants. But it will probably be fine.

Alocasias do grow quite tall as they mature so it may soon outgrow your fishbowl. It can survive in low humidity as long as the soil is properly watered. Your Philodendron grows more slowly and not nearly as tall as the Alocasia. It might be a better choice for your fishbowl.


Thanks! I'll do the prince of orange (or whatever it may turn out to be) instead. The room stays at about 40-50% humidity most of the time, with occasional drops to 35%. I've noticed it's enough to keep most houseplants happy, but I've never tried a plant that needs higher humidity.

I'm kinda hoping at least one of the tiny plants grows fast! I'm excited to see both at maturity.

I actually have a separate question for you. You were the person who helped me way back in winter when I got my Norfolk Island pine, so I thought it would only be right to ask you about it again. The tree was much smaller than it is now, and I'm afraid I'll not be able to provide it enough light or humidity for the winter. I managed to get by last season by using a 2,000 lumen, 6500k LED on the side of the Norfolk Island, and then a random cheap LED over the top of the plant. I'm afraid it won't like being put back inside now because the light it's getting outside is much stronger, and the humidity out there never drops below 60%. Since it is also larger now, getting it in a lighting situation similar to last season, would be difficult. Should I rightfully be concerned? Any recommendations for my unfortunate problem? I have similar worries for my fiddle leaf fig... Sad
Maybe we should get a second opinion...
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Aug 27, 2019 10:14 AM CST
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Birds
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My Norfolk came inside last winter (didn't go under the light either) and it was fine. That's not to say yours won't be, but it's pretty humid outside here during the summer where it vacations and it didn't skip a beat coming in last winter. Smiling
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Aug 27, 2019 10:31 AM CST
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
I have had success with Alocasias indoors in winter with desert-dry air. Yours should be fine as long as you keep the soil moist.

One of the primary and unsolvable problems with Norfolk Pines is that they can easily outgrow their indoor spaces and they cannot be pruned back to manage their height. Once the growing tip is cut off, the plant very slowly dies. This can be a heart-breaking plant indoors because after many years of healthy growth there is simply not a solution for its need for more height.

In this case, moving it outside where it grows more rapidly may be causing a long term problem. I suggest that you move it back inside, preferably in front of a moderately sunny window or with whatever artificial light you can provide. Humidity is not an issue.

Unlike your NIP, your FLF can be pruned back to manage its overall size and height. However, changes in light can lead to leaf drop as leaves tend to be adapted to the light they receive at the time they emerge. Moving plants in and out can are stressful, especially if the change in light is significant. Are there other concerns that you have with your FLF? If so, start a new post and provide a photo of your FLF.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at wcreed@HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
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Aug 27, 2019 12:30 PM CST
Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 38 years
Aroids Region: Florida Tropicals
My Prince of has had actual red leaves, and it has put out a kind of brick burnt orange red color before as well as several varying shades of orange. I have the photos of the color variation.
Thumb of 2019-08-27/Gina1960/6178ae

The alocasias in the group like 'Poly' like humidity, and do not like to be overwatered. I just found a really cool one today at a nursery I went to with a friend on a road trip.....ALocasia Mandalay...which I already had (it, like Poly, is an Alocasia sanderiana hybrid). BUT.....THIS ONE...is VARIEGATED!!!!! I was so shocked! It was the ONLY ONE. Snip Snap it was mine!
Thumb of 2019-08-27/Gina1960/bcf10c



If your Philo ends up looking more like this, with these dusky like leaves then it's McColley's Finale

Thumb of 2019-08-27/Gina1960/fa9032

Oh and these plants never 'revert'. They were chosen as seedlings out of a specific breeding program, propagated vegetatively to maintain these specific color combinations, and patented.
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Aug 27, 2019 4:18 PM CST
Southern Indiana (Zone 6a)
I'll quit while I'm ahead...
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WillC said:I have had success with Alocasias indoors in winter with desert-dry air. Yours should be fine as long as you keep the soil moist.

One of the primary and unsolvable problems with Norfolk Pines is that they can easily outgrow their indoor spaces and they cannot be pruned back to manage their height. Once the growing tip is cut off, the plant very slowly dies. This can be a heart-breaking plant indoors because after many years of healthy growth there is simply not a solution for its need for more height.

In this case, moving it outside where it grows more rapidly may be causing a long term problem. I suggest that you move it back inside, preferably in front of a moderately sunny window or with whatever artificial light you can provide. Humidity is not an issue.

Unlike your NIP, your FLF can be pruned back to manage its overall size and height. However, changes in light can lead to leaf drop as leaves tend to be adapted to the light they receive at the time they emerge. Moving plants in and out can are stressful, especially if the change in light is significant. Are there other concerns that you have with your FLF? If so, start a new post and provide a photo of your FLF.


My NIP sort of sat there for the first month or so after putting it outside. It's just been these last few weeks where it's went absolutely crazy. I think my NIP is now the perfect size, and I don't want it to grow more, so I'll start acclimating it to my southern window. Too bad it outgrew my lighting system, but it was bound to happen eventually. Shrug!

My FLF is going crazy, and is actually the same height as the NIP somehow. I had to cut my FLF back, though, because of the nasty bush crickets (katydids). I somehow am not having any issues besides the impending lighting and humidity stuff that I was talking about. It's been a great and easy plant since I've got it! I thought for sure I would've killed it in a week. Hilarious! I hope I didn't just jinx myself. Sad

I think tropical trees love Indiana summers, as I just remembered my ficus elastica has grown 8-10 inches in a partial shade situation. It was just 3 inches before I put it outside.

I think I'll keep the NIP inside next summer, but put the FLF and ficus elastica in bright shade back outside. Since I can prune them back, I'm not as worried about them growing.
Maybe we should get a second opinion...
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Aug 27, 2019 4:21 PM CST
Southern Indiana (Zone 6a)
I'll quit while I'm ahead...
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Hamwild said:My Norfolk came inside last winter (didn't go under the light either) and it was fine. That's not to say yours won't be, but it's pretty humid outside here during the summer where it vacations and it didn't skip a beat coming in last winter. Smiling


You probably have much brighter light than I do. Our winters are also mostly cloudy, so I worry about every single plant that gets light from windows. I think a NIP could almost survive your winters outside! Thinking
Maybe we should get a second opinion...
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Aug 27, 2019 4:24 PM CST
Southern Indiana (Zone 6a)
I'll quit while I'm ahead...
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Gina1960 said:My Prince of has had actual red leaves, and it has put out a kind of brick burnt orange red color before as well as several varying shades of orange. I have the photos of the color variation.
Thumb of 2019-08-27/Gina1960/6178ae

The alocasias in the group like 'Poly' like humidity, and do not like to be overwatered. I just found a really cool one today at a nursery I went to with a friend on a road trip.....ALocasia Mandalay...which I already had (it, like Poly, is an Alocasia sanderiana hybrid). BUT.....THIS ONE...is VARIEGATED!!!!! I was so shocked! It was the ONLY ONE. Snip Snap it was mine!
Thumb of 2019-08-27/Gina1960/bcf10c



If your Philo ends up looking more like this, with these dusky like leaves then it's McColley's Finale

Thumb of 2019-08-27/Gina1960/fa9032

Oh and these plants never 'revert'. They were chosen as seedlings out of a specific breeding program, propagated vegetatively to maintain these specific color combinations, and patented.


It's a relief that my nursery wasn't just faking their prince of orange. I was so close to buying the larger size, but it was 15 dollars more than the tiny one I got. I'm so ready for mine to mature, though.

Woah, I've never seen a variegated alocasia! It's so pretty! If I see more pictures of alocasia like yours, I think I'm going to start up an addiction...
Maybe we should get a second opinion...
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Aug 27, 2019 4:26 PM CST
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Birds
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CrazedHoosier said:

You probably have much brighter light than I do. Our winters are also mostly cloudy, so I worry about every single plant that gets light from windows. I think a NIP could almost survive your winters outside! Thinking


Sort of? Before my plant light, I tried overwintering houseplants in the same spot and lost most of them over the winter (some got leggy even).

I think it gets too cold here. We had 20 degree weather back in February this year (I think it was February)!
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Aug 27, 2019 4:35 PM CST
Southern Indiana (Zone 6a)
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Hamwild said:

Sort of? Before my plant light, I tried overwintering houseplants in the same spot and lost most of them over the winter (some got leggy even).

I think it gets too cold here. We had 20 degree weather back in February this year (I think it was February)!


Leggy plants are my nightmare. I overwintered some echeverias last year in that same south facing window, and they turned into leggy nightmares. They're still alive, but I kinda wish they weren't.

Oops, I just realized NIP are only hardy to 30 degrees. I thought they were hardy to 20 degrees. I let mine stay out in 25 degrees with some protection. Whistling
Maybe we should get a second opinion...
Last edited by CrazedHoosier Aug 27, 2019 4:35 PM Icon for preview
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Aug 27, 2019 5:26 PM CST
Southern Indiana (Zone 6a)
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This is the current situation for most of my houseplants. They're in one of those cheap 20 dollar greenhouses, but also under the overhang of the house. They get a couple hours of direct sun, and then some pretty bright light for the rest of the day. The FLF is towards the back because I'm getting it used to recieving a lot less light. Hilarious!
Thumb of 2019-08-27/CrazedHoosier/0c75ec
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Aug 27, 2019 5:39 PM CST
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Birds
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I have the same stand! I use mine for garden junk in our garage though. I found it on Facebook for $5. Whistling It's a rustbucket, but I didn't care, I put dirty stuff on it. Hilarious!

I have a little plastic corner plant stand. I found metal doesn't last long with all our rain. Sighing! I'll have to take a picture tomorrow. *Blush*
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Aug 27, 2019 5:47 PM CST
Southern Indiana (Zone 6a)
I'll quit while I'm ahead...
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Hamwild said:I have the same stand! I use mine for garden junk in our garage though. I found it on Facebook for $5. Whistling It's a rustbucket, but I didn't care, I put dirty stuff on it. Hilarious!

I have a little plastic corner plant stand. I found metal doesn't last long with all our rain. Sighing! I'll have to take a picture tomorrow. *Blush*


The plastic cover that came with the greenhouse, lasted about 3 months. We had a late winter, and ice piled on the cover. I cut the entire thing apart and left the top section! Now it just sort of has protection. Shrug!

I have a metal plant stand out there, too! It is coated in some thick, black paint, but yeah, it's starting to rust with our moisture. We hide it during the winter.

I'm sure your entire arrangement looks much better than mine. I literally just get plants and throw them in places. I see it, I like it, I want it, I throw it in a random place. Maybe it dies, or maybe somehow it lives. Rolling on the floor laughing
Maybe we should get a second opinion...
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Aug 27, 2019 5:51 PM CST
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Birds
Hummingbirder Butterflies Bee Lover Garden Art
CrazedHoosier said:

The plastic cover that came with the greenhouse, lasted about 3 months. We had a late winter, and ice piled on the cover. I cut the entire thing apart and left the top section! Now it just sort of has protection. Shrug!

I have a metal plant stand out there, too! It is coated in some thick, black paint, but yeah, it's starting to rust with our moisture. We hide it during the winter.

I'm sure your entire arrangement looks much better than mine. I literally just get plants and throw them in places. I see it, I like it, I want it, I throw it in a random place. Maybe it dies, or maybe somehow it lives. Rolling on the floor laughing


With me it's more like. Huh, no room. Okay, I can squeeze this one here! Whistling
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Aug 27, 2019 5:59 PM CST
Southern Indiana (Zone 6a)
I'll quit while I'm ahead...
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Hamwild said:

With me it's more like. Huh, no room. Okay, I can squeeze this one here! Whistling


I would be like that too if I had the light. Sad I'm always a little conscious about my poor lighting, so I limit what I like to what can survive in my light. My FLF is my biggest lighting risk so far. I have no clue if I'll be able to supply it with the light it needs this winter.

The alocasia I just got, requires high light, but it's so small I can just stick it right up to a LED and it'll be fine. Hilarious!
Maybe we should get a second opinion...

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