Daylilies forum: Show us your PODS

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Name: Sue Petruske
Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
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petruske
Sep 8, 2019 6:20 PM CST
This year I've started taking pictures of each pod and its seeds. Thought I'd post the pictures to perhaps help beginners know when it is time to harvest. I know that is always a question from beginners. I'm still a bit confused but have learned to let them go longer as long as they are not cracked. Sometimes they don't even turn brown but will turn a very pale green. It's nice when you can wait until it cracks open but sometimes something just tells me to pick it. It surely helps to keep records of the pollination date. That way you can guesstimate when they may be ripe. A couple of these below I almost waited too long and they were cracked open to the point of loosing a seed.

Here are some of my pods from this year:

Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/1b305a Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/926add
Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/be0039 Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/9c85ef
Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/3496d6 Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/5636cb
Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/568c5a Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/98e82d
Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/5ed33e Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/a66f56
Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/ad07f8 Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/e1ea8a
Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/756a7a Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/c147b2
Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/d6675b Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/021f7e
Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/984b2c Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/147143
Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/f67d1c Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/c15973
Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/681aab Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/40f3d7
Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/8073ee Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/06a8c7
Thumb of 2019-09-09/petruske/786ee4

Name: Davi (Judy) Davisson
Sherrills Ford, NC (Zone 7a)
Davi
Sep 9, 2019 4:25 AM CST
Great thread, Sue. Beginners often ask how you can tell when a pod is ready. Here is a fun photo of my pods....covered by the nylon "footies" that are used for trying on shoes. It keeps the deer from harvesting them before I do!

Thumb of 2019-09-09/Davi/ec211f

Name: Sue
Vermont (Zone 5a)
Daylilies Region: Vermont Garden Procrastinator Seed Starter Plant and/or Seed Trader
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SueVT
Sep 9, 2019 5:07 AM CST
The footies are a great idea!
I think I could also use them to hang bits of Dial soap from plant supports, to repel deer. (I have been using soap shavings, but this would be easier!)
Suevt on the LA
Name: Marcie
Sun Prairie, WI (Zone 5a)
mljohnson19
Sep 9, 2019 1:11 PM CST
Thanks for this post! This is my first summer doing some backyard hybridizing for fun, and I have been out inspecting the pods almost every day. I've kept track of the dates that I did the pollinating, but when I was gone on vacation, the bees did a lot of pollinating and I can only guess +/- a week when those set. I will take your advice and wait until the pods start to crack open.

I have two followup questions, though. First, if my children got overly excited and picked some green pods (that were likely around 40-45 days old) is it worth keeping the seeds to see if they sprout? And second, I'll likely still have pods when the first frost comes here in WI, will the frost kill them and is it best to pick them just before the first frost is predicted?
Name: Sue Petruske
Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
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petruske
Sep 9, 2019 5:55 PM CST
I don't know how long you can keep a pod/scape in a water vase. But I think it is important to change the water often. The second pod picture that I show above was broke off and I kept it in a vase of water for at least a week. In any case, if the cross is really important to you, put the scape in water. I'm only guessing that maybe a few weeks before harvest time may be the limit. HOPE OTHERS CHIME IN ON THIS QUESTION. Crossing Fingers!

If the pod is picked off the scape and you know it is 40 to 45 days old, I would try keeping it. However I would NOT open the pod right away. Let the seeds mature in the pod. You may get some good seeds. AGAIN, no experience, so if anyone can tell us their experience. Thumbs up

I also have some bee pods that will not be ripe before the first frost. I may try picking the scape and putting into water just to test it. Pretty sure some of them will not be worth the effort but if they are fairly big, I'll give it a try.
Name: Sue Petruske
Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
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petruske
Sep 9, 2019 5:56 PM CST
Pat and Larry, thanks for the acorns!! Smiling
Name: Valerie
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Irises Roses Peonies Butterflies Birds
Bee Lover Region: Canadian Ponds Garden Art Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters
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touchofsky
Sep 9, 2019 6:18 PM CST
I have picked pods here into October, and we have had frost by then. It didn't harm the pods.

As for placing broken scapes with pods in water, my notes indicate one was broken mid September, placed in water and opened Sept 29th. So, a couple of weeks. The others, I did not mark the dates.

I always feel it is worth it to try!
Touch_of_sky on the LA
Name: Tim
West Chicago, IL (Zone 5a)
Daylilies Native Plants and Wildflowers Vegetable Grower
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Lyshack
Sep 9, 2019 6:53 PM CST
mljohnson19 said: I have two followup questions, though. First, if my children got overly excited and picked some green pods (that were likely around 40-45 days old) is it worth keeping the seeds to see if they sprout? And second, I'll likely still have pods when the first frost comes here in WI, will the frost kill them and is it best to pick them just before the first frost is predicted?


I just accidentally broke off a pod that was 46 days old over the weekend. It was all green and definitely not wanting to open. Most of the seeds look round and shiny black, so I think I'm in good shape. In fall 2016 I pulled some early pods on purpose just to find out for myself how things work for me here. My results were:

less than 30 - 1 of 8 seeds germinated (it was a 29 day seed pod)
30-35 days -- 0% germinated (only 8 seeds tested)
36-40 days -- 50% germinated
41-45 days -- 60% germinated
46-50 days -- All but 1 germinated

I like to wait for them to look like Sue's, which takes me 50 days or more. When I do, I get 85% or better germination rate over the last three years.

I've not really paid attention to the frost and pulling pods. My best guess is, you'd have to have at least one very hard killing frost to kill the scape. As long as the scape stays green, I think it's still sending nutrients to your pod.

I've been really working on very lates the last few years, so it's not uncommon for me to pull pods mid-October or later. Certainly after the first frost. Only one time did a whole late pod's worth of seeds fail for me. 0 for 7 on a Fred's Red pod last year. Usually, I get some to germinate. Come to think of it, my first year hybridizing, I mostly bought seeds, but I remember pulling some pods off of Stella and Happy Returns and Centerton One in early December when I had to wipe the snow off the pods. Most of the seeds had already been picked clean by birds or fallen to the ground. I still got 30% of them to bloom. I think they are pretty tough if they get enough days in the pod.
Name: Sue Petruske
Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
Image
petruske
Sep 9, 2019 8:21 PM CST
Lyshack said:

I just accidentally broke off a pod that was 46 days old over the weekend. It was all green and definitely not wanting to open. Most of the seeds look round and shiny black, so I think I'm in good shape. In fall 2016 I pulled some early pods on purpose just to find out for myself how things work for me here. My results were:

less than 30 - 1 of 8 seeds germinated (it was a 29 day seed pod)
30-35 days -- 0% germinated (only 8 seeds tested)
36-40 days -- 50% germinated
41-45 days -- 60% germinated
46-50 days -- All but 1 germinated



Tim, Thank You! This is good information. Thanks for sharing!

Name: Mike
Hazel Crest, IL (Zone 5b)
"Have no patience for bare ground"
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Hazelcrestmikeb
Sep 10, 2019 2:33 PM CST
Sue tracking days till seed pods are ready is one step I personally don't have time for. I barely have time to tag my crosses in the morning before work. I mainly rely on writing things down this time of year and finish up the next morning if the need arises. All my pollen have a color coded tie so it is easier than writing tags to put on the flower. Example: pollen parent Indian Ripple have a green with white stripe tag assigned to it. So every green/WS tag on any diploid has IR pollen on it. You can also use the same color tag for a Tet with the same principle.
My 2 cents worth.
robinseeds.com
"Life as short as it is, is amazing, isn't it. MichaelBurton
"Be your best you". "Mikedon" on the LA.
Name: Ashton & Terry
Jones, OK (Zone 7a)
Windswept Farm & Gardens
Hostas Lilies Hybridizer Keeps Sheep Pollen collector Irises
Hummingbirder Region: United States of America Daylilies Region: Oklahoma Butterflies Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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kidfishing
Sep 10, 2019 3:13 PM CST
Hazelcrestmikeb said:Sue tracking days till seed pods are ready is one step I personally don't have time for. I barely have time to tag my crosses in the morning before work. I mainly rely on writing things down this time of year and finish up the next morning if the need arises. All my pollen have a color coded tie so it is easier than writing tags to put on the flower. Example: pollen parent Indian Ripple have a green with white stripe tag assigned to it. So every green/WS tag on any diploid has IR pollen on it. You can also use the same color tag for a Tet with the same principle.
My 2 cents worth.


A firm squeeze test on the seed will let you know if it can be harvested. If it cracks then pick it. If it is firm and no give, leave it.

Same here as Mike, and I also use colored tags because it is the only way to get anything marked before work. Still miss some due to time and not good notes to come back and mark after work. I keep a legend of my pollen parents and use colored clips and beads which give me hundreds of possible unique colored markers. We make 1000 pods so we need lots. Also, we duplicate colors for tets and dips and keep a tet legend and dip legend.
Dollar store has 250 colored or 250 silver clips for $1 and 400 assorted color small beads $1 so my markers are cheap too.

Example Legend:Diploid
White clip = Seedling 15-021
Blue clip /green bead= Merto Blues
Silver clip/white bead = Windswept Imagination
Silver clip/green bead = Seedling 16-011

Thumb of 2019-09-10/kidfishing/9ffc46

Example Legend: Tetraploid
White clip = Seedling 16-038
Blue clip /green bead= High Water Mark
Silver clip/white bead = Hook Echo
Silver clip/green bead = Stay Tuned
Kidfishing
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
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Seedfork
Sep 10, 2019 3:39 PM CST
I use the clips and beads also, and test the pods with a squeeze when I think they are near ready. Most of the time I catch them right as they are cracking open, miss one or two but always have more seeds than I have room to plant.
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Pollen collector Fruit Growers Permaculture Hybridizer Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener
Daylilies Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Photography Herbs Region: United States of America
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ediblelandscapingsc
Sep 11, 2019 6:23 AM CST
I do the squeeze test too. I don't write down the date of my crosses but when my seeds go in the fridge they are in bags marked week 1,2,3,4,5,6,and 7 for chilling requirements purposes. Most will not get planted until spring anyway but I don't like sharing seeds that haven't seen at least 3 weeks in the fridge. I only do cold stratification not cold moist stratification but I know many people do and swear by it.
­čî┐A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered­čî┐
Name: Sue Petruske
Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
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petruske
Sep 11, 2019 9:20 AM CST
In the past I've harvested too early so I thought I'd test the date method this year. I'm doing better because of it. I think it is training me or giving me confidence to change and forget about the dates.

That being said, however, I do like having both pod and pollen parent name on the pod scape at harvest time. BUT I can see where it would be a LOT easier at dabbing time to use the paper clips and beads. I'll have to consider that for next year. Maybe one color bead for pod parent and another for pollen parent...oh no...there aren't enough colors in the bead world for that. Hilarious!

I hope this thread is giving newbies ideas of different ways to go about marking and keeping records. And especially recognizing ripe pods. I still have a number of pods to collect and will try the pinch technique.
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
Image
Seedfork
Sep 11, 2019 11:01 AM CST
Walmart has a pretty good selection of beads and gym clips, Hobby Lobby has a fantastic selection of beads!
Name: Marcie
Sun Prairie, WI (Zone 5a)
mljohnson19
Sep 12, 2019 11:58 AM CST
Thank you guys for all the information, it is very helpful! I wish I had kept track of which pods got picked early so that I could track their germination rates, because I find your information fascinating, Tim. I'm a data kind of person. Smiling I also appreciate hearing how you all keep track of your crosses. I used colored strings this year, which worked well except for when my kids got overly excited about hybridizing and pollinated all the open flowers on one plant one day and used all blue string. It doesn't really matter, because we're just doing it for fun, but I do wish I knew which pollen parent went with each pod. But it's so fun that my kiddos are as excited about daylilies as I am!
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
Image
Seedfork
Sep 16, 2019 5:27 AM CST
I have almost collected all of my pods for the season, and I thought of this thread so here are a few photos of some of the pods I was collecting. These pods were on 'Kissed Off':
This is the stage I like to collect the pods in: Beautiful seeds inside.
Thumb of 2019-09-16/Seedfork/1fef23
I went ahead and collected these, just stating to crack open:
Thumb of 2019-09-16/Seedfork/f759dc
The photo below shows the collected seeds drying in the little ice cream containers I like to use. The plastic envelops are marked with the cross and the date and number of seeds. I let them dry for one day (more if we have had wet weather...we have not had any wet weather lately) then pop them in the fridge for a month before planting. The seeds are not actually placed into the envelopes until they have dried, then I add a few sprays of water (also just started adding vermiculite) to the baggie and then add the seeds.
You can see my list of varieties and their hybridizer codes laying on my bench...saves a lot of writing but I can't remember them all yet, so I keep the list handy.
Thumb of 2019-09-16/Seedfork/c94918

Name: Sue Petruske
Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
Image
petruske
Sep 16, 2019 7:54 AM CST
Seedfork said:
The photo below shows the collected seeds drying in the little ice cream containers I like to use. The plastic envelops are marked with the cross and the date and number of seeds. I let them dry for one day (more if we have had wet weather...we have not had any wet weather lately) then pop them in the fridge for a month before planting. The seeds are not actually placed into the envelopes until they have dried, then I add a few sprays of water (also just started adding vermiculite) to the baggie and then add the seeds.
You can see my list of varieties and their hybridizer codes laying on my bench...saves a lot of writing but I can't remember them all yet, so I keep the list handy.
Thumb of 2019-09-16/Seedfork/c94918


So, you dry one day (or more); then into the frig for a month.

Then after a month you spritz with water and add vermiculite to the bag? Is that what we call "moist stratification"?

At the time of spritzing and vermiculite, do you leave them in the frig until they germinate and then plant? Or do you take them out of the frig to germinate?


Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
Image
Seedfork
Sep 16, 2019 8:15 AM CST
No, I dry them for a day, then add the vermiculite and water, then put them in the fridge and let them sit for a month.Then take them out and plant the seeds in cups and plant the cups in my protected seedling beds. Yes that is what is called "moist stratification".
It is not my intention to leave them in the fridge until they germinate but some of them will germinate in the fridge.
Name: Sue Petruske
Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
Image
petruske
Sep 16, 2019 10:05 PM CST
Okay, I was just curious. I'd like to be able to do that kind of turnaround. But that would mean I'd have to put up with the snakes and armadillos like you do. Blinking Crying NO WAY Rolling on the floor laughing

Because of my zone (5a) as you probably know, we do it differently here. They go in the baggies after drying for several days and then into the frig until about early March. Then out of the frig and then into bags with either damp/wet paper towels, perlite, or vermiculite...depends on what I feel like doing in any give year. Then when they germinate, into trays that I keep either in the house or garage or maybe in the basement this year (never tried that). I prefer in the house but we have 4 cats now and I don't think they would leave them alone. Glare Naughty cats...but we love them.

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