Ask a Question forum: Anthurium draconopterum browning

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Name: Emma
Netherlands
Emmalouny
Sep 21, 2019 3:04 PM CST
Hello, I've recently just got this anthurium with another anthurium (other is doing fine). I'm a bit worried about it, I'm not too familiar with anthuriums so I'm not entirely sure what's going wrong.

I've noticed brown spots appearing over the past few days, on the leaf and a bit on the stem just under the leaf. It is in moist spagnum, I spray it when it feels almost dry (damp), humidity in here is always above 60% and it's in bright indirect light. It arrived in spagnum moss so i thought it would be okay to swap the moss for some fresh moss. My soil mix for this plant is on it's way so I cant immediately transfer it. It had healthy roots when I put it in the pot though, I'm scared to check them at the moment, because I don't want to create any more stress. The stem also seems to be slumping over a bit and no sign of bugs. What could I be doing wrong?
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[Last edited by Emmalouny - Sep 21, 2019 3:09 PM (+)]
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Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
Image
Gina1960
Sep 21, 2019 7:31 PM CST
This anthurium is an epiphyte so the fact that it is in moss should not be detrimental. I grow several of the epiphytic anthuriums (but I do not have this particular one) in moss all the time, in coir baskets filled with moss. Others I grow in straight (no soil) orchid bark with coarse perlite and charcoal mixed in. One I grow in lava rock because it is a lithophyte. It depends on how I got the plant, I have a tendency to leave them in the media they were already growing in and step the size of the container up when the roots start growing through the bottom. You may have damaged some of your roots when you 'swapped the moss' it came in for fresh moss. This plant is native to Ecuador and grows in a wide range of conditions there from the coastal areas up to about 2000 feet elevation, and is generally growing in very moist conditions. I can see a new leaf emerging on your plant. Exactly how long have you had it? Did it come in the mail? If so, it could be a combination of trying to recover from the stress of shipping, and being 'repotted' into new moss immediately. It may just need time to recover and get more established.
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Name: Emma
Netherlands
Emmalouny
Sep 21, 2019 11:13 PM CST
I got this plant on September 13th, so it's been here for a week and a bit. It was shipped from Ecuador then from Germany, I live in the Netherlands.

Having said that should I leave it in the spagnum at the moment? Will it be okay? Am I over watering? Should I take it out and make sure each root is covered in spagnum? Its quite airy in there to be honest, because I didnt want to disturb tbe roots too much.

I just recently bought some fir bark for reptiles, is that an appropriate orchid bark? I would eventually like to transfer it to a soil mix with natural fertiliser, in a couple months if now is not a good time.
Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
Image
Gina1960
Sep 22, 2019 5:54 AM CST
Well, its had a long trip, no? Ecuador, to Germany, to the Netherlands. So in a box for a bit. That would be a struggle for any plant. When you got it, was it actually potted more tightly in the moss, or just wrapped around in some for the shipping process? Had it dried out? Some plants are much more forgiving to the process of shipping than others.

No, you should not take it out to make sure each root is covered. Disturbing the roots again will only make things worse. Disturb the roots as little as possible.

As I said in my first post, this is an EPIPHYTIC species of Anthurium that comes from a region of Ecuador where it generally gets a lot of moisture. That means it does not grow in soil normally in its natural habitat. It would normally be attached to a tree, a rock or something else. The food it would get would come from animal droppings and any nutrients it could catch from water running over the roots from somewhere else. Like some orchids. It would be much happier in keeping it in the sphagnum, but placing it in MORE sphagnum in a basket that has the ability to have very open drainage. And placing it in the sink to water it thoroughly, so that the moss is kept moist but not dripping wet, not just on the surface but down around the roots.

If you place it into fir bark, that is ok too, but I would NOT remove any moss that is adhering to the roots when you do that. You should mix some other stuff into the bark to help make it more chunky, like coarse perlite, charcoal chunks (the kind for orchids, not for cooking) perhaps chopped coir pieces.

You may lose that one big leaf. It looks like it is taking all the stress of the process of it getting to you then being disturbed again too soon.

I would leave it in moss in the container it is in until you see roots coming out of the bottom holes of the container and it has produced a few leaves. Then I would move it to its more permanent home.

In the USA this is a rare species. It is very expensive here. If you bought it from Ecuador you probably bought it from Ecuagenera? They are a reputable company, I have bought many plants from them over the years. But they should do a much better job though of educating their customers about each specific plant, because even though an anthurium is an anthurium, some are a lot harder to make happy than others, some are epiphytic, some are hemiepiphytic, and some are terrestrial... each of these types has different needs in culture. They do that in person, but not so much through the mail.

When you fertilize this plant, which I would wait for a good while until it is well established and growing well before you even think of doing that, I would use pretty much only a foliar feed. Epiphytes potted in moss or bark, the moss will deteriorate much more quickly if you douse it with water soluble fertilizer on a regular basis. And the bark has a danger of fertilizer buildup.
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Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
Image
Gina1960
Sep 22, 2019 6:05 AM CST
I am going to photograph a few of my epiphytic anthuria and show you how they like to be grown. But like any piece of advice, it only goes as far as the ability of the person you are giving it to to follow it.

My growing conditions are much different and very conducive to growing these types of plants. Its a greenhouse, very wet, very humid, lots of 360 degree light. Growing plants like your Draconopterum might be challenging. But if you provide what it needs, you should be able to do it.
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Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
Image
Gina1960
Sep 22, 2019 7:03 AM CST
This is how an epiphytic anthurium grows in nature. This is Anthurium crenate, mounted to a tree. Minimal media, just a piece of coir fiber matting cut to hold it on until it has wrapped enough roots around the tree to support itself. Its totally independent now
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This is the Anthuriuspectabile in epiphytic culture. In an orchid pot with the roots all coming out stuck to the pot. When the plant gets watered the clay absorbs some of the water and the stuck on roots can draw from it until its gone. Eventually the roots will hang down like a Vanda orchid
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Anthurium forgetii in epiphytic culture, growing in chunky bark mix

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Close up of roots leaving the basket and re-entering

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Anthurium pseudospectabile in epiphytic culture
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roots
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I can sister on a new media filled basket to the bottom later
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Name: Emma
Netherlands
Emmalouny
Sep 22, 2019 8:49 AM CST
Wow that is very helpful! Yes it was from ecuagenera:) it was kinda crushing the roots almost it looked too tight, and yes dry, so I removed it gently and stayed away from the moss that was attached to the roots. When you say put it in a sink to water, do you mean submerge the moss and the pot in water? Or let the moss soak up some water from the drainage holes? I have tried watering previous plants by pouring water in but it always seemed way too wet to me. I have charcoal (not super chunky because its difficult for me to get here) but it's relatively chunky, perlite and ground coir, I can get coir chunks. I also have worm castings for the fertiliser, I try to stay away from the liquid fertilisers. I live in an apartment with substantially large windows, south west and west facing windows only.

The new leaf is also a little brown, can it survive without leaves at all?
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
Sep 22, 2019 8:55 AM CST
Your Anthurium is reacting to the trauma of its shipping. It will need time and patience to slowly recover and further develop its roots. The key will be your ability to keep the sphagnum moss damp but not wet. It is in a good rooting medium, but it will take time for the roots to expand sufficiently to fill its pot. Only then should you consider moving it into another pot with a different potting medium.

Keep it simple.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
Image
Gina1960
Sep 22, 2019 10:15 AM CST
Emmalouny said:Wow that is very helpful! Yes it was from ecuagenera:) it was kinda crushing the roots almost it looked too tight, and yes dry, so I removed it gently and stayed away from the moss that was attached to the roots. When you say put it in a sink to water, do you mean submerge the moss and the pot in water? Or let the moss soak up some water from the drainage holes? I have tried watering previous plants by pouring water in but it always seemed way too wet to me. I have charcoal (not super chunky because its difficult for me to get here) but it's relatively chunky, perlite and ground coir, I can get coir chunks. I also have worm castings for the fertiliser, I try to stay away from the liquid fertilisers. I live in an apartment with substantially large windows, south west and west facing windows only.

The new leaf is also a little brown, can it survive without leaves at all?


I wouldn't submerge it to water it or try to let it soak from the bottom. Just sit it in the sink and water it if you have one of those sink sprayers? Then let it drain thoroughly. My baskets in the greenhouse get almost daily water. But that might be too much in your apartment because the air flow in the greenhouse is quite high, in your apartment, its not the same so it will dry out more slowly. You want the moss to be around the roots not totally suffocating them but not leaving huge air pockets either.

If the stem is firm and there are sufficient roots, even if the little new leaf is somewhat deformed, the plant should recover and put out new leaves once it gets established. Please don;t be surprised if it just kind of sits there for a while. The fact that its moss had dried out in transit says a lot...it took a beating in shipping from getting too stressed.

This is a lovely plant to grow, but I have heard from friends who have it that it ranks up there with Anthurium warocqueanum, the Queen anthurium (which I do grow) in its ability to be finicky. If I were ever able to obtain one at a reasonable price, I would get one and give it a try. The price on Ecuagenera is not expensive, but when you factor in the shipping and cost of phytosanitary documents to the states it goes up pretty quick. And the fact that if the shipment gets held up in customs, which the Port of Miami is kind of notorious for, it could be bad (has been bad in the past on group orders overseas I have been in on with friends). In the past, we have ordered from the website and had them bring the plants to the US when they were doing the big Orchid Extravaganza in Cleveland, and my friend would go pick them up. There were no extra charges that way, and she was able to get full cultural details about anything we bought. Then after a bit of recovery she would forward my plants on to me.

Keep us posted about the progress of your plant, I know you can make it go!

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[Last edited by Gina1960 - Sep 22, 2019 10:18 AM (+)]
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Name: Emma
Netherlands
Emmalouny
Sep 22, 2019 11:37 AM CST
WillC said:Your Anthurium is reacting to the trauma of its shipping. It will need time and patience to slowly recover and further develop its roots. The key will be your ability to keep the sphagnum moss damp but not wet. It is in a good rooting medium, but it will take time for the roots to expand sufficiently to fill its pot. Only then should you consider moving it into another pot with a different potting medium.

I will definitely leave it alone 😊 thanks

Keep it simple.


Name: Emma
Netherlands
Emmalouny
Sep 22, 2019 11:44 AM CST
Gina1960 said:

I wouldn't submerge it to water it or try to let it soak from the bottom. Just sit it in the sink and water it if you have one of those sink sprayers? Then let it drain thoroughly. My baskets in the greenhouse get almost daily water. But that might be too much in your apartment because the air flow in the greenhouse is quite high, in your apartment, its not the same so it will dry out more slowly. You want the moss to be around the roots not totally suffocating them but not leaving huge air pockets either.

If the stem is firm and there are sufficient roots, even if the little new leaf is somewhat deformed, the plant should recover and put out new leaves once it gets established. Please don;t be surprised if it just kind of sits there for a while. The fact that its moss had dried out in transit says a lot...it took a beating in shipping from getting too stressed.

This is a lovely plant to grow, but I have heard from friends who have it that it ranks up there with Anthurium warocqueanum, the Queen anthurium (which I do grow) in its ability to be finicky. If I were ever able to obtain one at a reasonable price, I would get one and give it a try. The price on Ecuagenera is not expensive, but when you factor in the shipping and cost of phytosanitary documents to the states it goes up pretty quick. And the fact that if the shipment gets held up in customs, which the Port of Miami is kind of notorious for, it could be bad (has been bad in the past on group orders overseas I have been in on with friends). In the past, we have ordered from the website and had them bring the plants to the US when they were doing the big Orchid Extravaganza in Cleveland, and my friend would go pick them up. There were no extra charges that way, and she was able to get full cultural details about anything we bought. Then after a bit of recovery she would forward my plants on to me.

Keep us posted about the progress of your plant, I know you can make it go!



Ah I see, I'll get myself a spraying watering can, do you water it when the top feels almost dry? The moss feels kinda bouncy so I think it should be okay in there. It has a lit of roots, I even saw one speaking out the top, so I covered it in moss. I dont think it will rot because at the moment I spray the top with water whenever it feels like it's almost dry.

Ah I hope it will be happy in that case. It is a beautiful plant.

Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
Image
Gina1960
Sep 22, 2019 1:59 PM CST
Good luck! Post want photos. We have a Philodendron/Anthurium/Aroid forum on the site
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Name: Emma
Netherlands
Emmalouny
Sep 22, 2019 2:10 PM CST
Okay I will 😊 thanks!
Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
Image
Gina1960
Sep 22, 2019 2:15 PM CST
Just curious, which other anthurium did you also get?
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Name: Emma
Netherlands
Emmalouny
Sep 23, 2019 12:01 AM CST
I got an anthurium lanceolatum. I thought I would start small and see how it goes! I'm in love with both, to be honest they arrived in really good condition considering they were held up in customs for a week.

I lost the leaf this morning by the way :/ it all dried up. Fingers crossed for the little blighter now 😂
Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
Image
Gina1960
Sep 23, 2019 6:28 AM CST
I only see a little bit of browning on the edge of the new leaf so far. Hopefully it will unfurl fine. That the cataphil (the sheath of tissue that surrounds and protects the emergent leaf) is brown is normal.
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Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
Image
Gina1960
Sep 23, 2019 10:48 AM CST
Oh lanceolatum is a nice plant. It is synonymous with A. acaule. I have a few in the greenhouse.
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[Last edited by Gina1960 - Sep 23, 2019 10:48 AM (+)]
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Name: Emma
Netherlands
Emmalouny
Sep 23, 2019 10:56 AM CST
Gina1960 said:I only see a little bit of browning on the edge of the new leaf so far. Hopefully it will unfurl fine. That the cataphil (the sheath of tissue that surrounds and protects the emergent leaf) is brown is normal.


I came home and it seems to be more brown :/ not lucky with this one.

Ah I was wondering why I couldnt find much information on it!

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Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
Image
Gina1960
Sep 23, 2019 12:16 PM CST
Its an (eventual) larger growing Pachyneurium (bird nest) anthurium
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Name: Emma
Netherlands
Emmalouny
Sep 23, 2019 1:02 PM CST
Wow they are so different! I wonder when mine will develop into something similar.




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