Views: 684, Replies: 9 » Jump to the end
Observe Your Environment Before Selecting Plants

By Dutchlady1
July 19, 2012

When moving to a new area, you probably are itching to start planting your yard. I recommend driving, riding a bike, or walking around your new neighborhood for a while to see what grows there in order to not make costly mistakes.

[View the item] Give a thumbs up

Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
Image
RickCorey
Jul 18, 2012 6:58 PM CST
Genius! Certainly the people who've lived in an area for ages will have found everythiung that thrives easily, and most of the things that are possible.

And cruising through entire neighborhoods avoids getting mis-information from just one person.

It is great to grow things that are well-adapted to my own climate! It makes me think I'm a good gardener. For me, that would be Rhododendrons and Delphiniums. I've heard that Lupins like my climate ... maybe I'll try them next.



Name: Robert B
Bradenton, Florida (Zone 9b)
Plumeria to trade!!!
Enjoys or suffers hot summers Hummingbirder Region: Gulf Coast Amaryllis The WITWIT Badge Seed Starter
Bromeliad Plant and/or Seed Trader Tropicals Ponds Dog Lover Plumerias
Image
RobertB
Jul 18, 2012 7:54 PM CST
Thank goodness my neighbors have GIANT plumeria trees!!!! Hurray! Hurray! Hurray!


RobertB
Name: Jonna
Mérida, Yucatán, México (Zone 13a)
Garden Procrastinator The WITWIT Badge Region: Mexico I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Ponds Tropicals
Enjoys or suffers hot summers Plumerias Plays in the sandbox Dog Lover Cat Lover
Image
extranjera
Jul 18, 2012 10:47 PM CST
I don't know if that picture was supposed to illustrate what you should or shouldn't plant, I'd guess though that musseanda and plumbago would both do well in your area. I just got a white musseanda like the one in the picture and it is kind of straggly too. I think they usually look a bit bare at the bottom. I love the blooms though, and hope that I can hide the bare spots and see the blooms.
A day without sunshine is like, you know, night.
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
Image
Dutchlady1
Jul 19, 2012 3:36 AM CST
Jonna - I should have probably mentioned that - while I love the Mussaenda - I have lost three so far because they are SO cold-sensitive. I have planted yet another one.
I think they get more lush with more water but my yard is on the dry side.
Name: Jean
Hot Springs Vlg, AR, DeLand, F
Region: Florida Daylilies Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
rocklady
Jul 19, 2012 10:06 AM CST
Great advice! It also is prudent to make sure you take note of how much different areas of your yard get direct sun and for how long. Also if you have small trees -- the amount of shade you have in the future will depend on how fast they grow and how much shade they produce. Planting "upper story" trees under other "upper story" trees will only result in disappointment.
Any day you wake up on the sunny side of the grass is a good day.

"The moving hand writes and having writ moves on. Neither all thy piety nor all thy wit can lure it back to cancel half a line nor all thy tears wash out a word of it." The Rubiyat by Omar Khayyam
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
Image
Dutchlady1
Jul 19, 2012 10:34 AM CST
Excellent point! That should be its own separate tip!
Name: Cindi
Wichita, Kansas (Zone 7a)
Charter ATP Member Plant and/or Seed Trader Permaculture Roses Ponds Peonies
Lilies Irises Daylilies Dog Lover Beekeeper Garden Ideas: Master Level
Image
CindiKS
Jul 19, 2012 11:07 AM CST
Yep, but there's shade and then there's shade.....meaning what grows in the shade of a building may be totally different from what can grow in the shade under a tree. Some shade plants just can't compete with tree roots. Of course, different trees have different roots, so even that gets complicated. When I moved into my house in the country, all the neighbors came by and told me not to bother to plant trees, because they "won't grow out here". I planted trees anyway, and shrubs, and perennials, and thousands of bulbs, and more. Their trees continue to die and mine flourish. THEY didn't do research on what type of trees to plant! I did. THEY should have gotten soil and water tests and made any necessary improvements. They also allow grass to grow right up to the tree trunk, where I mulch the whole drip line so that grass doesn't steal water from the tree. We're in a hot, windy, droughty area. In the city, just 2 miles north, it's a whole different ball game.

Remember that children, marriages, and flower gardens reflect the kind of care they get.
H. Jackson Brown, Jr.
Name: Linda
Medina Co., TX (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Salvias Herbs Bluebonnets Native Plants and Wildflowers Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Forum moderator Purslane Hummingbirder Cat Lover Butterflies Birds
Image
LindaTX8
Jul 19, 2012 3:12 PM CST
Asking around for input from local people can't be over-emphasized if you moved from somewhere else or haven't gardened before. I know that in Texas it's crucial. In many areas, big box stores are not a good place to start out. Some of their plants won't work here...or they might, if you want to go to all the extra trouble of babying them a LOT. Their employees can't give good advice either. And my DD (who has had no gardening experience) had a house built and got a really bad landscaping guy that didn't even amend the soil in the yard and put some plants in helter-skelter...mostly bad choices. She ended up hating almost all of it. To give you some idea how clueless that man was, he planted a small fig tree...next to a sidewalk alongside a busy street. Now she's having a REAL landscaper work with her yard to fix the problems. I hope it works out...she doesn't live near me, so not a lot I can do.
I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority. E. B.White
Integrity can never be taken. It can only be given, and I wasn't going to give it up to these people. Gary Mowad
[Last edited by LindaTX8 - Jul 19, 2012 3:14 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #288570 (8)
Name: Jonna
Mérida, Yucatán, México (Zone 13a)
Garden Procrastinator The WITWIT Badge Region: Mexico I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Ponds Tropicals
Enjoys or suffers hot summers Plumerias Plays in the sandbox Dog Lover Cat Lover
Image
extranjera
Jul 19, 2012 3:24 PM CST
It takes a year to really know the levels of sunlight you have in different areas. I've lost quite a few plants because of that, I would plant them in the winter when the sun is lower and comes under some of the things producing shade, come summer they would be getting only a few hours of afternoon sun. That's a hard thing to fix, I've finally decided that some of my plants will do better in summer and others in winter and as long as they can survive the off season I'll be happy.
A day without sunshine is like, you know, night.
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
Image
RickCorey
Jul 19, 2012 8:04 PM CST
Besides peeking at what DOES grow well for your neighbors, look extra hard at the yards of people with scraggly, struggling, dieing plants. That tells you what NOT to plant, or at least warn you that those plants will need something their current owners are not giving them.

If you spot the same plant doing well in Yard #1, and poorly in Yard #2, you know who to ask for advice!

One thing you can always do in return for advice (or cuttings) is to offer to water for them if they go away for more than a few days.

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Observe Your Environment Before Selecting Plants
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "Lilium 'Pink Perfection'"