Daylilies forum: Let's Discuss Rot

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Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
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Seedfork
Oct 10, 2019 4:39 PM CST
I purchased two double fans of 'Wrennetta Powell' I planted the first double fan in full sun out in the garden along with 14 other plants. The other double fan I potted up and placed the pot in shady spot along with about 100 or so other potted daylily fans, maybe 20+ varieties.
The first two fans planted in the garden developed rot and I lost both fans. When I retrieved the other two fans that were planted in the pot I discovered one of those fans had developed rot...currently the other fan is still alive.
We are in a drought now over a couple of months with no rain, so I was watering the plants with a hose almost every day. I think I over did it, and I know I have read that high heat and lots of water can help cause rot, even though I thought that was normally coupled with fertilizing the plants. So I put off the fertilizer but still developed rot. The fact that so far it has only been the one plant after a period of about six weeks leads me to believe that the variety was subject to rot. Still I would love go get everyone's feed back with how to avoid rot, how to treat rot, and a list of any plants that seem to be prone to rot...or any other rot related info. Anyone have any experience with Rot Ban or similar products, home dips, or witch doctor cures?
Edited to add: Darn left off the title, can the title be added Please?
"Let's discuss Rot".
[Last edited by Seedfork - Oct 10, 2019 5:22 PM (+)]
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Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
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Seedfork
Oct 10, 2019 5:12 PM CST
Thanks Char!
Name: Char
Vermont (Zone 4b)
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Char
Oct 10, 2019 5:32 PM CST

Moderator

You're welcome Smiling
Name: Karen
Southeast PA (Zone 6b)
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kousa
Oct 10, 2019 5:47 PM CST
Dynamic Glow died from rot last summer. This was the first daylily to succumb to rot. By the time I discovered it, it was to late to remedy the situation. Was such a pretty daylily too.
(Zone 8b)
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pinkiris
Oct 10, 2019 6:33 PM CST
I too had several plants this year lost to rot, the ones lost from rot - were 'new to me plants' that I had gotten in 'spring 2019' ....

the following were lost to rot and were NOT salvageable .... these few come to mind at the moment ...

Royal Girls
Ancient Royalty
Honey on my Lips
Lies and Lipstick
Ruby Lipstick
The Calm before the Stork
The Holo Deck
The Tribble with Blue

edit to add

these were all planted in ground, not in containers.

[Last edited by pinkiris - Oct 10, 2019 6:36 PM (+)]
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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Oct 10, 2019 6:34 PM CST
From AHS FAQ:

Crown and Root Rots

Plant yellows and may collapse, leaves may pull out easily, affected tissue is often mushy and plant may die. Signs of a fungus may be visible, e.g. "shoestrings" for Armillaria rot, and "mustard seeds" for southern blight (Sclerotium rolfsii), otherwise exact diagnosis requires submission to a diagnostic laboratory

Foul smell may, or may not, be present

May involve a combination of factors such as nematodes, bulb mite or other pest damage, fungal and/or bacterial pathogens (disease causing agents), weather conditions, gardening practices, soil aeration and moisture conditions

Some cultivars may be more susceptible than others

Of particular concern in warmer climates but may also occur elsewhere

Ensure adequate soil aeration and drainage

Avoid or correct areas of poor air circulation

Avoid too much or too little water and don't over-estimate water needs in periods of high humidity (check soil moisture before watering)

Avoid over-fertilizing-Avoid over-amending with high water-retentive organic materials

Remember that high temperatures increase transplanting stress and try to avoid if possible

Don't plant too deep

Let wounds from dividing air-dry in the shade before re-planting

Remember that plants in pots are subject to more extreme root/crown temperatures (and therefore stress) than those in the ground

Treatment differs according to causative agent/s so get laboratory diagnosis of persistent rot problem

https://daylilies.org/daylilie...

To that last part, where a fungus is involved you need to know which one because different fungicides are appropriate for different pathogens. Thus what works for one person may not work for another.
Name: Elena
NYC (Zone 7a)
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bxncbx
Oct 10, 2019 7:15 PM CST
I don't think I lost any daylilies this year although I may have lost some seedlings.

I typically get rot in the Spring. I'm thinking it's due to the many freeze/thaw cycles we tend to get. This past year we had a very mild winter and a Spring with no late freezes. It was also really rainy so if it was due to overwatering I would have lost plants. But everyone was fine.

That being said, I do have Amethyst Art in a pot and I voted it most likely to rot away this year. It did not like all the rain last year and the wet spring/summer this year. I think it went down to a single fan. It finally perked up and started adding fans with the mini drought we had late Aug/Sept. That one definitely needs sharp drainage in my garden.
Name: Tina
Greenup, Ky (Zone 6b)
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beenthere
Oct 11, 2019 2:33 AM CST
I nearly lost one of my newly planted Goodbye Pork Pie Hat last year to what looked (and smelled) like crown/root rot. The soil in my garden varies and this plant ended up in an area with white clay veins. I've since read that this type of clay is low in oxygen? Dug it up, replanted up hill in the dry zone, and it recovered and bloomed this year. The only seedling I lost this year I stupidly planted in the exact same place. Seedlings 12 inches on either side are doing just fine. That has been my only experience with crown/root rot so far. Been watering a half inch every three/four days for about six weeks d/t no rain.
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
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Seedfork
Oct 11, 2019 6:48 AM CST
Found this old thread, should have looked first I guess, but happy to get new reports on plants with rot.
The thread "Regarding my crown rot and trying to save the plants" in Daylilies forum
I really like Hemlady's suggestion of using Comet Cleanser, it might serve a dual purpose of drying and disinfecting at the same time.
Lots of good info in that thread, interesting read.
It is good to see that if all plants can't be saved that have rot, at least some maybe even most of them can be
Name: Valerie
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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touchofsky
Oct 11, 2019 7:17 AM CST
I have used Comet on iris rhizomes with rot, and it seemed to work. Good luck, Larry and let us know how it works for you.
Touch_of_sky on the LA
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
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Seedfork
Oct 11, 2019 9:56 AM CST
Well, I have already re-planted my 'Wrennetta Howell' but if I get rot again (if I can remember what to do) I will try it. I feel sure I read that earlier thread before but forgot about the comet, I knew clorox was suppose to work but could not remember the ratio to use. Would love to have some feedback on Banrot and Subdue from those who have used it as a preventive measure.
Found this article :
The thread "Regarding my crown rot and trying to save the plants" in Daylilies forum
He mentions using bleach with a 20:1 ratio, I think that actually should be 1:20 ratio, anyhow I think that would be 6 oz. of bleach per gal. of water.
Just by chance Bill's latest blog post contained an article about finding rot in his garden yesterday.
http://www.ofts.com/daylilyblo...
[Last edited by Seedfork - Oct 11, 2019 10:09 AM (+)]
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Name: Maryl
Oklahoma (Zone 7a)
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Maryl
Oct 11, 2019 11:01 AM CST
Larry: Pardon my ignorance, but who is and where is "Bill" of the Happy Daylily blog. He's got some beautiful seedlings............As to rot; the bleach formula that was given to me is 3 Tablespoons bleach to 1 Gallon of water for 10 to 20 minutes, then rinse with clean water. Make sure it's the regular bleach as now they are promoting "concentrated" bleach and the formula may be a different ratio..........Maryl
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
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Seedfork
Oct 11, 2019 11:30 AM CST
Bill Jarvis I think is the blogger and has an excellent site, I love reading his stuff online.
See the Aug. 12 2019 post for more on rot.
He describes doing early on, before he knew better, of doing what I was doing that I believe caused my problem, watering every day or every other day, I think that was way too often even in drought.
Link to his web site:
http://www.ofts.com/bill/dayli...
Name: Maryl
Oklahoma (Zone 7a)
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Maryl
Oct 11, 2019 3:01 PM CST
Thanks Larry for the information. I think it is Bill Jarvis.........I grow almost all of mine in pots for, among other reasons, our heavy clay soil which has killed many an in ground plant after our deluges. Roses do better surviving being water logged for a couple of days or so, but daylilies really need pretty good drainage. I do have some rot issues occasionally, and it's almost always water related. But as others have said, I think it's a cultivar issue too. If it's one you really really like - it will rot over one you are just ho hum about. Figures............Maryl
Name: Nancy
Bowling Green Kentucky (Zone 6b)
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alilyfan
Oct 11, 2019 6:39 PM CST
I have a major problem with rot every year, so i am watching this thread closely. This summer I only had 1 plant develop crown rot, it was one I received shortly before our drought started. I think I was watering it too much. I definitely think certain plants are more prone to crown rot. Any fans of a plant that has survived seems to develop it again. Other plants all around it are fine. I rarely seem to have luck saving a plant, and sometimes I think I just make it worse, but I am going to try suggestions here. Hope they work for me!
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
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Seedfork
Oct 13, 2019 12:07 PM CST
Thursday afternoon I noticed 'Sierra Mountains' the door prize I won at Bell's Daylily Spectacular was not looking quite right. But I was having to get my plants ready for the Club sale Saturday. Saturday I was too busy to even get down to the garden to do anything. Then this morning when I was planting all the new plants from the club sale I thought to check on 'Sierra Mountains' it was a victim of rot already, the fan pulled lose from the remains of any crown or roots, mostly just a clump of decay was wall that was left in the ground. It was amazing to me how fast the plant deteriorated. I thought I would have time to get caught up and check back on it, but in just two days it was done for.
I dug out the soil, treated it with a clorox mixture and put new soil back in the hole. I did plant one of my club plants back in the spot...running shot of good spots. So I will check on it and hopefully have no more to rot, Crossing Fingers!
Name: Paul
Utah (Zone 5b)
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Paul2032
Oct 13, 2019 12:19 PM CST
I must admit to not having read this whole thread but in rot in iris I have scraped out the rot and then used a product like Comet or Ajax......
Paul Smith Pleasant Grove, Utah
[Last edited by Paul2032 - Oct 16, 2019 8:31 AM (+)]
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Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
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Seedfork
Oct 13, 2019 12:58 PM CST
Paul, I think that is a good thing to do, but it has to be caught early and done quickly, or as with my plant, there is nothing left to scrape the rot off of, or apply the comet to. Lesson learned I guess, is don't delay once you even suspect there might be a rot problem, act immediately. It is amazing to me there was still a decent little green fan left, with nothing to support it.
(Zone 8b)
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pinkiris
Oct 13, 2019 2:19 PM CST
Larry, that is exactly what was happening to mine this year, by the time I noticed any signs of deterioration, it was too late in saving them. and yes, you might think you have 'a fan' left to save - when that fan that is green just falls off. Sighing!
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
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Seedfork
Oct 13, 2019 3:19 PM CST
Naturally in a drought like we have had for the past 2+ maybe three months, when a new plant is planted you will see some dying leaves, that is pretty common I think anytime a daylily is transplanted. Even if the plant is potted up and placed in a shady spot, I did have rot develop under those conditions also. Of course during a drought you feel you need to give the plants extra water, that is what I was doing. I have read not to over water and not to under water...they just fail to mention how to tell that is what you are doing. When a plant first starts showing dead leaves how do you tell the normal dying off of leaves due to transplant shock compared to the dying off of leaves due to rot. I thought I could detect a difference in the color of leaves in a plant that developed rot down in the bog, they had a different hue of brown, maybe a little gray mixed in, I detected that rot quick enough to cure the problem, because when I pulled on the dying leaves a little fan pulled off in my hand. Sofar, that is the only way I have been able to detect when a plant has rot (not by the color of the dying leaves, put by the fans separating when pulled on), so maybe the best thing to do is be vigilant about removing dead leaves and giving a slight (very slight) tug on the fans as you remove the leaves?
Anyone out there have a better way of detecting rot? Oh, and I think what I read about watering only twice a week after being newly planted is also excellent advice, certainly not every day.
[Last edited by Seedfork - Oct 13, 2019 3:48 PM (+)]
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