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Oct 20, 2019 4:45 PM CST
Name: Paul
Utah (Zone 5b)
Grandchildren are my greatest joy.
Annuals Enjoys or suffers cold winters Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Garden Procrastinator Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Plays in the sandbox
Tender Perennials Tomato Heads The WITWIT Badge Region: Utah Vegetable Grower Hybridizer
Do you prefer dips or tets? Why if you do.
Paul Smith Pleasant Grove, Utah
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Oct 20, 2019 5:04 PM CST
Name: Mary
Crown Point, Indiana (Zone 5b)
I love them both. Hurray! Thumbs up Hurray!
I are sooooo smart!
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Oct 20, 2019 5:46 PM CST
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Amaryllis Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Orchids Master Gardener: Florida Irises
Herbs Region: Florida Vegetable Grower Daylilies Birds Cat Lover
Not sure I have a preference regarding dips or tets, but the one attribute I'm looking for here in Florida is a high resistance to rust. If a cultivar isn't rust resistance, it simply will gradually peter out for me over a couple of years, no matter how robust the plant was at the beginning. My two "stars" in my Florida garden are Licorice Twist and Siloam Double Classic, which now that I look them up are both diploids. Both re-bloom, and rarely get a spot of rust, and both have increased to such large clumps I'm going to have to divide them soon. Some others that were rated with moderate rust resistance haven't stood up too well. Destined to See and Leabee Orange Crush both are suffering from decline due to rust this year. I completely lost my plant of Savannah Banana Split, before it even bloomed.

I also plant daylilies in my daughter's garden in Utah, and have all re-bloomers there for her, because she wants as much bloom for the space allowed as she can get. They are so busy with two pre-schoolers and both parents working that easy care plants that bloom often are the high value in their garden. I take some plants that are rust-prone to Utah with me when I go in the spring, because the dry air there really shuts down the rust problem pretty well. Canadian Border Patrol has done wonderfully in her garden, and it is a tet. The other big success there is Pandora's Box, a diploid. I have to find the list of starts I got from Susan to figure out the others I've planted in her garden. I wasn't there to see them bloom this year as I visited in May and again in August (just in time to do the deadheading), but I did get to see some of her iris)
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
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Oct 20, 2019 5:56 PM CST
Name: Dave
Wood Co TX & Huron Co MI
Butterflies Peonies Native Plants and Wildflowers Region: Michigan Irises Hybridizer
Hostas Greenhouse Daylilies Garden Photography Region: Texas
I agree with Mary. It's about the plant, not the ploidy.
Life is better at the lake.
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Oct 20, 2019 8:27 PM CST
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
dyzzypyxxy,
Do you treat your plants in anyway for rust? I have quite a bit of rust in the garden at the moment, but no plants look so bad that I feel I might lose them. I did buy some Bayer 3 in 1 Insect,Disease and Mite treatment today and hope to start using that once the predicted rain has passed. It is supposed to also treat for leaf miner, and that is something that has been progressing more each year in my garden.
I like both Dips and Tets, but I have about four times as many Tets as Dips. No matter what they are, I prefer nice green foliage with stout scapes and large blooms. Now I am pursuing mostly plants with bud counts of at least 20 and branch counts of at least 5, and trying to slowly add to my Sculpted Relief registered plants and plants to cross with them. That is the main reason for the over balance in Tets to Dips.
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Oct 20, 2019 10:18 PM CST
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Amaryllis Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Orchids Master Gardener: Florida Irises
Herbs Region: Florida Vegetable Grower Daylilies Birds Cat Lover
I've been using a biologic fungicide called Actinovate lately. It does seem to help with the daylily rust, but doesn't eliminate it. Also it's vairly pricey so I use most of it on my orchid collection to protect against Phytopthora black spot disease, and the remainder gets to the plumeria, figs and daylilies so maybe they could use a better, more consistent dose.

Will keep trying with it next year if any of my rust-prone daylilies make it through the winter. We shall see.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
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Oct 21, 2019 12:39 AM CST
Name: Mike
Hazel Crest, IL (Zone 5b)
"Have no patience for bare ground"
Paul I am on the Mary's bandwagon Hurray! Thumbs up Hurray!
Rust is not a problem here unless I get a plant from the warmer states that have it. That is the main reason that I am going with fall shipment henceforth from rust prone areas. I don't have the time to treat and spray.
robinseeds.com
"Life as short as it

























is, is amazing, isn't it. MichaelBurton

"Be your best you".
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Oct 30, 2019 5:11 AM CST
Name: Vickie
southern Indiana (Zone 6b)
Bee Lover Garden Photography Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Region: United States of America
Region: Indiana Garden Art Annuals Clematis Cottage Gardener Garden Ideas: Level 2
Good question, Paul. I've not given it much thought before because I like so many and they are both dips and tets. I did find the link below that points out a few characteristics about tets that may cause some folks to lean toward liking them better.
https://cottageinthemeadow.pla...

I do think that the scapes on the tets are sturdier (in general). More like cornstalks in some cases Rolling on the floor laughing If they hold up the blooms, I don't care if it is a tet or dip.

Here is a link to a thread on this site with more viewpoints:
The thread "Diploid or Tetraploid?" in Daylilies forum
May all your weeds be wildflowers. ~Author Unknown
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Oct 30, 2019 9:35 AM CST
Name: Ashton & Terry
Jones, OK (Zone 7a)
Windswept Farm & Gardens
Butterflies Keeps Sheep Pollen collector Region: Oklahoma Lilies Irises
Hybridizer Hummingbirder Hostas Daylilies Region: United States of America Celebrating Gardening: 2015
We have 2 hybridizers in our family. I only have and work with diploids and my son Ashton mainly works with tets. We have 1200 registered daylily cultivars and 5000 seedlings. I say to each, choose what you like.

We both agree here that diploids are easy for hybridizing in our southwest location. The only other local hybridizer (other than small back yard gardener) has tetraploids only and uses controlled conditions for hybridizing. We do everything outdoors in normal conditions. Our friend hybridizers use shade houses, a shaded patio and an air conditioned room to set seeds on tetraploids. The diploids set seeds best after the weather has warmed up.

Also, I have found many rust resistant and rust free diploids but few tets. (a few spider and uf dormant tets have pretty good resistance). We have been introduced to rust from plants purchased in spring from the south. It does not overwinter here. The last time we had rust, I noticed our main bed with registered daylilies, almost all the tets were infested with rust. Several diploids which are mainly small and miniatures, had foliage growing into the rusty tets but not a spot of rust on them. I have several rust resistant and rust free diploids from two exposures of rust in the past several years.
Kidfishing
Last edited by kidfishing Oct 30, 2019 11:26 AM Icon for preview
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Oct 30, 2019 9:42 AM CST
Name: Bob
Northeast Florida (Zone 9a)
dyzzypyxxy said:Not sure I have a preference regarding dips or tets, but the one attribute I'm looking for here in Florida is a high resistance to rust. If a cultivar isn't rust resistance, it simply will gradually peter out for me over a couple of years, no matter how robust the plant was at the beginning. My two "stars" in my Florida garden are Licorice Twist and Siloam Double Classic, which now that I look them up are both diploids. Both re-bloom, and rarely get a spot of rust, and both have increased to such large clumps I'm going to have to divide them soon. Some others that were rated with moderate rust resistance haven't stood up too well. Destined to See and Leabee Orange Crush both are suffering from decline due to rust this year. I completely lost my plant of Savannah Banana Split, before it even bloomed.

I also plant daylilies in my daughter's garden in Utah, and have all re-bloomers there for her, because she wants as much bloom for the space allowed as she can get. They are so busy with two pre-schoolers and both parents working that easy care plants that bloom often are the high value in their garden. I take some plants that are rust-prone to Utah with me when I go in the spring, because the dry air there really shuts down the rust problem pretty well. Canadian Border Patrol has done wonderfully in her garden, and it is a tet. The other big success there is Pandora's Box, a diploid. I have to find the list of starts I got from Susan to figure out the others I've planted in her garden. I wasn't there to see them bloom this year as I visited in May and again in August (just in time to do the deadheading), but I did get to see some of her iris)


I appreciate the tip about Licorice Twist. I am testing over 40 different varieties now that are supposed to have high resistance. I am thinking about doing a FB forum called "Daylilies - Rust resistant, evergreens". Where people list daylilies they find to be resistant and a source.
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Oct 30, 2019 9:54 AM CST
Name: Dave
Wood Co TX & Huron Co MI
Butterflies Peonies Native Plants and Wildflowers Region: Michigan Irises Hybridizer
Hostas Greenhouse Daylilies Garden Photography Region: Texas
Thinking You should see Brian Reeder's blog about his work on hybridizing for rust resistance.
Life is better at the lake.
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Oct 30, 2019 5:18 PM CST
Name: Tim
West Chicago, IL (Zone 5a)
Daylilies Native Plants and Wildflowers Vegetable Grower
I like dips in May and early June, and again in late August to frost. I like Tets late June to Mid August.

I like dips for season extenders... the ones that bloom really early or really late, or bloom early and then rebloom late in the summer. And I like Tets for the head-turners in the middle, although there are some real lookers in the Dip world, too.
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