Houseplants forum→White ghost euphorbia cutting

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Name: Megan
RI (Zone 6b)
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Megos1286
Oct 23, 2019 6:25 AM CST
Several weeks ago a colleague gave me this cutting. After doing some research, I have heard so many different instructions on how to root it - so I'm asking you guys! I have rooting hormone gel on hand, and this guy has been cut from the original for quite some time.

Thanks to all in advance!
Thumb of 2019-10-23/Megos1286/ad4c33
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
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WillC
Oct 23, 2019 3:13 PM CST
There is not necessarily a single best way to propagate a Euphobia cutting. I suggest that you get a small 2-4 inch terra cotta pot and fill it with a porous Cactus potting mix. Then insert the cut end of the cutting about three--quarters of an inch deep into the potting mix. Try to keep the potting mix barely damp and in a warm, sunny location.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Megan
RI (Zone 6b)
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Megos1286
Oct 23, 2019 5:22 PM CST
Thanks Will!
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
Oct 23, 2019 5:34 PM CST
Happy to help. Let us know the results.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Megan
RI (Zone 6b)
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Megos1286
Oct 24, 2019 6:37 PM CST
Will do!
Name: Tara
NE. FL. (Zone 9a)
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terrafirma
Oct 24, 2019 6:54 PM CST
Very much looking forward to your progress! Please do keep us updated!
Name: 'CareBear'

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Region: Pennsylvania
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Stush2019
Oct 26, 2019 8:40 AM CST
Rooting jel is not needed but will help. Best to put in a glass with about 2 inches of pure perlite. Set the cutting in the glass so it stays upright inside it. Not needed to bury it but just set on top. Keep the perlite or grit slightly moist. Some times it takes months before you see any results. Next year, plant up in cactus mix supporting the cutting upright with sticks if necessary. It;s just another way.
I have the crested type which is always producing reg. lactea which I remove and root up.
The green cuttings will stay E. lactea and the white cuttings will be E. lactea Ghost.
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These are tow cuttings that are about 5 years old.
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Name: Megan
RI (Zone 6b)
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Megos1286
Dec 10, 2019 11:43 AM CST
Thank You!

I'll try to remember to post a picture later (I like to visit garden.org during lunch hour at work). I dipped the end in rooting hormone gel and potted it in a 2" terra cotta pot with cactus mix. It's my understanding that euphorbia are relatively slow growing and will take a while to root? Is that true?
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Dec 10, 2019 12:32 PM CST
When I rooted Euphorbia lactea cuttings given to me generously by Stush years ago, I just used a small container with cacti mix, and added a lot of grittiness to it by adding pumice or perlite. The first cutting I got, I failed miserably since I left it outdoors in winter, trying to test if it can endure it, so I found out it does not like our mild winter weather. The next batch he gave me, since I learned my lesson, I promptly hide them now indoors once temps starts falling below 45F-50F. When it is rooted, I can allow it to taste the first of the Fall rains, before I finally let it hide indoors for winter. By the way, always wear gloves when handling this plant, sap is toxic.

As for your cutting, position it by your warmest and brightest area indoors for now. Do not expect a quick turnaround. It will be a long, long wait...may have to wait till late Spring to late Summer. This type of Euphorbia loves lots of light and heat, and this time of the year is not the most agreeable time to coax those roots. But just the same, leave it alone using a gritty mix, in a container with drain holes....and wait, very very patiently. DO NOT water, without roots, there is nothing to absorb the moisture in the soil, so it will easily get basal rot if media is damp/wet, It will just utilize whatever moisture it has stored in its body. It will for sure go thinner but just continue keeping it warm. Your patience is very important.

Make sure you use containers with drain holes. Do not use too deep containers, use for now a shallow but wide mouth container since your cutting is quite small.

I find that it rests during winter. I really wait till outdoor temps are more stable and warm before I attempt to bring it out, like daytime highs should at least be hitting 60F and overnights at least 50F. When finally brought out, position first in part sun ideally just morning sun and shade in the afternoon, so it can slowly acclimate to the outdoor conditions, Then as the hotter, drier months come around in June to July, then it will wake up. This is how I know it is finally awake from its very long winter slumber: By this time it is already positioned by my sunniest area outdoors. When it starts to display like that, I can generously water it, and it is ever so ready to drink up, get fatter stems, branches out and do new leaf growth.
File photo 21Jun2016
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File photo 26June2017
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Good luck! I hope to see updates on your white ghost later on!
Name: Megan
RI (Zone 6b)
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Megos1286
Dec 13, 2019 11:24 AM CST
Thank you! So, Tarev you're saying that I shouldn't water it at all? My concern is the soil will turn into a rock over time Shrug!
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Stay Home-Save Lives-Wear a Mask!
Cat Lover Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Region: California Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
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tarev
Dec 13, 2019 11:27 AM CST
Yes, no watering for now....there are no roots.

For your media, the soil must be gritty and porous, that way it does not go rock hard. That is why I use cacti mix and add about 40% perlite or pumice to it, mixing it well.

Just to add, I further top dress the media, with pumice or chicken grit (insoluble crushed granite), that way the base of the plant is not getting too wet later on when watering resumes and not cause undue rotting especially if your area tends to have high humidity during the summer months.
[Last edited by tarev - Dec 13, 2019 11:36 AM (+)]
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