Roses forum: Great article on the subject of shovel pruning--I need to remember this!

Views: 1077, Replies: 14 » Jump to the end
Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
Image
Mustbnuts
Nov 27, 2019 4:42 AM CST
Hit the Road Jack: The Brutal Art of Shovel Pruning
Ruth Tiffany
Master Rosarian, San Diego Rose Society

Let's face it: sometimes things just don't work out. You start off with the highest of hopes, the best laid plans, the noblest intentions, the most beautiful dreams. But somewhere along the way, something goes wrong. You begin to feel let down and disappointed, apathetic and strangely depressed. Deep in your heart, you know it's time to call it quits.

And yet, it's so hard to let go! You don't want to give up those fantasies of a perfect life together. You can't bear to face the gaping hole that saying good-bye will leave in your life. You're not convinces that anything better will ever come along, and anyway you dread the work involved in starting all over. Above all, you're wracked with guilt.....

Hold on. Let's stop right here for a minute and tighten our tether to reality.

First, we're talking about roses. A rose bush is not an actual spouse. At best, it was a blind date. You weren't really committed. You never promised to live with the thing in sickness and health until whichever one of you keeled over first. No matter how infatuated you were when you planted it, no vows were taken, no binding contracts signed. When the time comes for the two of you to part ways, there will be no legal consequences. You will no have to pay alimony for the rest of your life, nor will you be indicted on charges of first degree murder.

Second, a rose bush does not have neurons and therefore does not feel pain. There will be no blood curdling primal scream when you rip it out by the roots.....not from the rose anyway (wear gloves! ). I confess I have some issues around this myself, as I've always had a tendency to anthropomorphize everything in sight. When I was a child l named all the bugs and butterflies I caught and wept bitterly when they died. But, I am crazy. Don't let it happen to you.

Now, let's review some of the Frequently Asked Questions about shovel pruning.

Q: What does it mean to "shovel prune" a rose?

A: It means you look the rose in the eye and you say, "Hey nothing personal, it's just business." (Or maybe, "Honest, honey, it's not you, it's me; I just need some time to think.") Then you pick up the shovel and pull the trigger, and that's that. Capisci? If you can't bring yourself to kill it, just give it to your mother-in-law.

Q: When is the best time to shovel prune a rose?

A: Some schools of thought think you should give a rose several years to prove itself: "First year sleeps, second year creeps, third year leaps." Other schools of thought think you should inflict capital punishment the minute a rose starts to seriously get on your nerves. Most people tend to be bit more trigger-happy when they're running out of room for new roses. It's really up to you.

Q: How can I tell whether I should shovel prune a particular rose?

A: Always remember there are no bad roses. There's only the wrong rose in the wrong climate or the wrong place for the wrong person in the wrong mood at the wrong time.

That said, let's look at nine examples of roses that are prime candidates for shovel pruning:

THE JOLLY GREEN GIANT---All the books swore this rose would be a compact three-foot shrub, yet it takes up more space than a 20-piece mariachi band. All the books swore this rose was an excellent rebloomer, yet you haven't seen a flower since last Easter. You find yourself swearing more than the books.

THE PETRI DISH---So many gross minor-oganisms flourish and fester and ooze on this rose that the CDC is sending a team in haz-mat suits to place it under quarantine. Make sure your vaccinations are up to date before you go near it.

THE ANESTHESIOLOGIST---The rose that's so boring it puts you to sleep.

THE MAIL ORDER BRIDE---You though you clicked on Jessica Simpson, but somehow you ended up with Eleanor Roosevelt in your shopping cart. Gee, think maybe those photos were touched up just the teeniest bit?

THE CUJO---This vicious and highly aggressive rose has repeatedly tried to rip off your arm, put out your eye, or maybe even slit your throat. It's had your poor husband cornered in the back of the tool shed since last Tuesday. Time to rent a Bush Hog and show the beast who's boss.

THE EBENEZER SCROOGE---This stingy old thing makes you work your fingers to the bone, yet payday never seems to roll around. Just say bah, humbug!

THE FICKLE PROMISE---Here's a rose that never seems to grow. Year after year, you wait with bated breath for full and lush and magnificent mature growth, but the actual plant just sits there looking exactly like the pathetic little bundle of twigs it was the day you planted it. Ask yourself: what's wrong with this picture?

THE ONE CANE WONDER---It tries so hard, puts a few great roses on it's single, solitary, lone cane but can't seem to grow another cane. Maybe it's just an old curmudgeon, a hermit, a feckless old fart with a bud union so gnarled and tight-fisted it won't ever let a companion join the fun.

THE NORWEGIAN BLUE---How much longer are you going to pretend this moribund bush is just pining for the fjords? Maybe it's time for you to wake up, Polly. In the immortal words of John Cleese, "I'll tell you what's wrong with 'im: 'e's expired and gone to meet 'is maker! 'E's a stiff! Bereft of life! 'Is metabolic processes are now 'istory!" Face it, there's never going to be a better time to dig and toss.

In the final analysis, life is too short, yards are too small, and there are too many wonderful roses out there to waste time on any rose that doesn't make your heart dance the Macarena with joy. SO don't be afraid to grab that shovel! No need to be sad, Brad; just dig up the dirt, Kurt; rip out the roots, Toots; and get yourself a rose that makes you happy instead.

(with special thanks for thoughts and ideas from Elizabeth Churchill)
SoCal (Zone 10a)
Image
SoCalGardenNut
Nov 27, 2019 9:38 AM CST
Hilarious. I need to remember this when I shovel prune my roses.
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses Clematis Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages Forum moderator Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
zuzu
Nov 27, 2019 11:46 AM CST

Moderator

I can't tell you how much I appreciate this article, Mustbnuts, injecting some badly needed common sense into my usual anthropomorphizing view of plants. Hilarious! I hope I will now have a whole new outlook on the roses in my garden that produce so little return on so much outlay. Thank you.

fisherwoman
Nov 27, 2019 12:04 PM CST
Just what i needed to hear after William Shakespeare 2000 and Charles Rennie Mackintosh bit the dust. All is not lost just because of them. I'm really looking forward to trying some own root form Antique Rose Emporium.
Coastal Southern California (Zone 13a)
Image
jerijen
Nov 27, 2019 3:04 PM CST
She's a great lady, too.

When we did more talks, we frequently took a shovel with us. I would offer up a permanent solution to powdery mildew and other diseases -- and when folks picked right up, Clay would bring out the shovel.
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
Image
seilMI
Nov 27, 2019 6:51 PM CST
Love it! All lessons that were hard for me to learn early on but I'm glad I finally caught on.
SoCal (Zone 10a)
Image
SoCalGardenNut
Dec 1, 2019 11:46 AM CST
2 roses bit the dust yesterday. These two I bought last year, no guilt here. In its place I replanted 2 clematis plants.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
Dec 1, 2019 1:08 PM CST
I have several dead roses that have needed to be removed - some for over a year - but I wanted to be sure they were really, permanently dead.
Porkpal
Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
Image
Mustbnuts
Dec 1, 2019 3:08 PM CST
Ah, Pork, waiting for that flat EEG line, want to see if they push up daisies instead of rose buds, etc.?

Reminds me of an auditor we had at work one year. He was going through some medical charts and he was wondering why they no longer had any current entries. We explained to him that the person was dead. He asked, what is dead? Our MD was listening to all of this and I started to explain that the person had moved to a higher existence and was no longer living. The person was deceased, dead. The auditor still didn't understand. So our MD added, flat EEG line, not breathing, no heart rate, was deceased, etc. It took about five minutes before the auditor understood that the person was not going to return for services and was dead. Yea, that was some auditor! I remember he wore a very bright red sweat suit to work. Needless to say, he never returned.
Name: Jim
Central Pa. (Zone 6a)
Image
jim1961
Dec 1, 2019 8:54 PM CST
he he great article...
I've have had to shovel prune probably 90+ roses so I have lots of practice in this area...lol
Hope everyone is doing well!
Name: David Tillyer
New York City (Zone 7b)
Image
BigAppleRoseGuy
Dec 2, 2019 1:19 PM CST
This whole discussion reminds me of the Monty Python "Dead Parrot Sketch".
I'm so old that I remember seeing it on TV, but you young people can watch it
on YouTube. That's name of it on YouTube: Monty Python Dead Parrot Sketch. Enjoy.
David
Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
Image
Mustbnuts
Dec 2, 2019 5:08 PM CST
David, that Monty Python sketch is a classic! Very, very funny! Holy Grail fan here. So appropriate for us gardeners--I think I will plant a shubbery!
Name: Ken Wilkinson
N.E. GA. (Cornelia) (Zone 7b)
Frugal Gardener Butterflies Bulbs Birds Bee Lover Cat Lover
Dragonflies Hummingbirder Roses Region: Georgia Daylilies
Image
KenNEGA
Dec 2, 2019 6:29 PM CST
I have no problem making roses "go away". Moving up to N.E. GA from S.E. FL has taught me that roses I loved in Fl., don't always like cold weather. I don't have frigged zone 5 problems but I have found out there are a LOT of roses that struggle with zone 7A. I'm getting to old to "wait" for a rose. If I see a rose that is struggling in the spring to come back from the winter, it gets replaced with something that does well in zone 6.
It's a rose!!! It has nothing to do with life and death.
SoCal (Zone 10a)
Image
SoCalGardenNut
Dec 2, 2019 7:13 PM CST
That's how I feel about everything and not just roses. Lol
Name: Carol
Alberta, Canada (Zone 3b)
Image
Canadian_Rose
Dec 13, 2019 1:50 AM CST
I love that!!! What a clever writer...I agree whole-heartedly!! Siagnora!! It's raining shovels, Hallelujiah!!

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Roses forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by mmolyson and is called "Spring is on the Way"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.