Roses forum: Wintertime diversions

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Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses Clematis Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages Forum moderator Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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zuzu
Nov 29, 2019 1:14 AM CST

Moderator

Now that most of us in the Northern Hemisphere will be spending much more time inside for the next few months (in fact, some of us might describe it as being "trapped inside" by the wet and cold weather outdoors) and will have more free time, free of the need to water the garden and pull weeds, I think we should share some thoughts on wintertime diversions related to this forum.

Mustbnuts has already started the process this month by sharing some favorite rose articles. For my part, I suppose I could nag you to use this free time to go through your photo files and start adding images to our database or to share your experience with the roses you have grown by composing plant comments for the database for each rose, but I think I'll go along with the fine trend Mustbnuts has started instead.

I don't have any favorite rose articles, but I do have a favorite rose photo site. The pictures on this site, taken by two rose enthusiasts, one in Nevada and one in New Zealand, are truly exquisite. The best thing about them, however, is that they actually do resemble the roses and aren't the typical "glamour shots" you'll find on some sites and in some catalogs, where the shapes and colors are photoshopped to a ludicrous extent.

This is the home page:
http://www.justourpictures.com...
This is the site index:
http://www.justourpictures.com...
These are a couple of my favorite pages on this site:
http://www.justourpictures.com...
http://www.justourpictures.com...

Some of these photos have launched me on years-long searches for the photographed roses.

Because I know that threads with a thumbnail photo are more likely to be read, I'm adding a photo of Winter Sunset, a sweet Buck shrub.

Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
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Mustbnuts
Nov 29, 2019 9:34 AM CST
Zuzu, what a wonderful site and resource. Thank you for posting it. It has captured my attention for the last hour and a half! I finally had to click off of it so I can get some work done around the house. Oh, and they have proteas! I love proteas and unfortunately, can't seem to get them here (plus they grow up to be big plants and I don't have the space). If I ever get rose rosette disease, the roses will be replaced by them (somehow). Thank you again. I am off to see what mischief I can get into around the house hanging quilt racks.
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
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seilMI
Nov 29, 2019 2:05 PM CST
Great site and one I didn't know about. Thanks for the share!
Name: Beth
Northern California (Zone 9b)
Roses Enjoys or suffers hot summers Container Gardener Clematis Garden Photography Birds
Irises Keeper of Poultry Region: California Hummingbirder Cat Lover Lilies
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Beth_NorCal
Nov 29, 2019 2:26 PM CST
OMG I used to look at their website all the time.. yrs ago!! Some gorgeous photos on there!
SoCal (Zone 10a)
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SoCalGardenNut
Nov 29, 2019 2:31 PM CST
Thanks for sharing, I'm not aware of this website. Make me want to get a new camera.
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
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seilMI
Nov 30, 2019 2:12 PM CST
Oops, I forgot to add what I do to keep sane during the winter, lol!

Winter is when I start my rose seeds. Usually the first week of January I'll clean all the seeds and stratify them for about 6 weeks. Then I start checking them for germination. Once germinated they go into starter trays until they have two sets of true leaves. Then they get potted up into 16 oz. cups. This all takes many weeks but if it's still too early for them to go outside they stay under the lights until the temps are warm enough. But I do try to get them outside in the sun as soon as possible. They always do much better outside.

Thumb of 2019-11-30/seilMI/c8bda8

My other winter pastime is feeding, watching and photographing the birds. You have to do something to fill those long, cold, gray days. It makes them pass quicker if you keep busy, lol!

Thumb of 2019-11-30/seilMI/980f17

Name: Carol
Alberta, Canada (Zone 3b)
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Canadian_Rose
Dec 13, 2019 1:53 AM CST
Seil - Oh! What a lovely bluejay!!! It will be great to see your first blooms from your seedlings.
Name: Carol
Alberta, Canada (Zone 3b)
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Canadian_Rose
Dec 13, 2019 1:53 AM CST
Zuzu - I used to look at their photos many years ago...thanks for reminding me!!
Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
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Mustbnuts
Dec 13, 2019 7:29 AM CST
Not sure whether to post this here or start a new thread, but most of us will be pruning our roses over the next few months. Until last year or so, I didn't know that different types of roses require different pruning techniques. I thought everyone pruned roses like you prune a hybrid tea rose. Exception, of course, being climbers. I started last year pruning according to the rose type. Made a big difference. Lots more blooms this year until the heat and hoplia beetles ruined them (of course!). Rather than retype everything--I have to get back to crocheting snowflakes and finish this project up--I will place links here for folks to read at their leisure, if interested.

https://berkeleyhort.com/how-t...

https://www.heirloomroses.com/...

Most of the labels on my roses and plants are fading and need to be redone. When I get a chance to do that this winter, I will be putting what type of rose it is and the year of its breeding. That should help me quickly decide when and how to prune them. People are always asking me what year my old roses were bred. I now have so many, it is hard to keep them straight in my mind, so this will help. Just need to find labels big enough or have two on a single stake.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
Dec 13, 2019 9:32 AM CST
Great articles! Thanks, Mustbnuts.
Porkpal
Name: Carol
Alberta, Canada (Zone 3b)
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Canadian_Rose
Dec 13, 2019 12:03 PM CST
Mustbnuts - the pictures make everything so understandable on the Heirloom site! Very easy to understand... Thank You!
SW Ohio River Valley (Zone 6b)
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vaporvac
Dec 13, 2019 1:39 PM CST
MbNs, you could write on both sides of the labels. I like to see the breeder also.
Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
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Mustbnuts
Dec 13, 2019 2:40 PM CST
Great idea Vap! Thanks!
Name: Beth
Northern California (Zone 9b)
Roses Enjoys or suffers hot summers Container Gardener Clematis Garden Photography Birds
Irises Keeper of Poultry Region: California Hummingbirder Cat Lover Lilies
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Beth_NorCal
Dec 16, 2019 2:52 PM CST
I also want to try some OP seedlings like Seil. I saw a couple hips out there the other day that should be ripe soon. Love that Blue Jay Seil!! We have the much less beautiful Scrub Jays out here. And I saw a Bluebird out on one of my garden sculptures a couple weeks ago!! I love it! Oh and I forgot, I want to get a greenhouse to propagate roses, and start other seeds too. Might have to be my Xmas present!!
Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
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Mustbnuts
Dec 18, 2019 7:46 AM CST
Here is an interesting article on the American Rose Trials for Sustainability. Not really wild about their choices but who knows? I don't know if they were able to shop for the roses or if the roses were given to them by the company who is carrying them. That would make a big difference. Sorry that the images wouldn't copy. Here is their website.
https://www.americanrosetrials...


American Rose Trials for Sustainability
Author: Marcy Sousa
Published on: December 16, 2019
Did you know the UC Master Gardener Program of San Joaquin County has been part of a National Rose Trial since 2018? The National Rose Trial is part of the American Rose Trials for Sustainability (A.R.T.S.) Program which has trial sites across the United States. The National Rose trial was initiated in 2012 by individuals representing multiple rose stakeholder groups including: private industry, the scientific community, and public gardens.

Two rows of blooming roses, pink on the right and red on the left with a narrow mulched path for walking in between. Roses are planted next to parking lot.
Since 2018, UC Master Gardeners in San Joaquin County have been part of a National Rose Trial. The trial is part of the American Rose Trials for Sustainability program, which aims to identify roses that perform well in a given region when grown under "minimal input conditions." (Photo: Marcy Sousa)
The goal of the A.R.T.S. program is to identify roses that perform well in a given region when grown under "minimal input conditions." What are "minimal input conditions?"

there are no pesticides used
we do not deadhead the flowers
there is no pruning (except to remove winter-killed canes in the spring, or those killed by rodents)
we do not add any fertilizer (only compost is added prior to planting)
plants are not covered in the winter (in colder climates it is common to cover and protect roses)
A.R.T.S. national test sites are strategically located throughout the U.S. and are hosted by partners that share the A.R.T.S. mission including botanical gardens, arboreta, municipalities, colleges and universities. There are only two Mediterranean climate trial locations and they are both located in California. The National Rose Trials at the UC Cooperative Extension office in San Joaquin County began in 2018, and the second location at Fullerton Arboretum started in 2019.

Roses in pink, yellow, white and red are in full bloom with extra large showy flowers. Surrounding the roses on both sides are trees and a hillside off in the horizon.
Rose bushes in full bloom, outside of the UC Cooperative Extension Office in San Joaquin County (Photo: Marcy Sousa)
A.R.T.S. defines its climate regions using the Köppen climate classification system, which is the preferred means used by ecologists. This system not only takes into account temperature, but also seasonal precipitation and humidity. The A.R.T.S. evaluation protocol has 45% of the score reflecting sub-components of the health and quality of the foliage, 42.5% the presentation and quality of the flowers and 12.5% reflecting the plant's growth habit. Climate can greatly impact all three of these evaluation categories.

How does the trial work?

Karrie Reid, UC ANR Environmental Horticulture Advisor, has been managing and overseeing the trial since its inception in 2018. Roses were planted in an unused turf area that was converted to rose trial grounds. One of the selling features of converting the turf sections was the calculated water savings - 3,656 sq. ft. of turf used more than 103,000 gallons of water, while 60 roses in the same area on drip irrigation uses approximately 6,175 gallons, a huge 94% savings!

Each year starts the beginning of a new trial with 20 difference rose cultivars. Three of each rose variety is planted randomly throughout the beds, allowing ample spacing between plants to observe natural plant habit. Mixed in the plantings are two standard rose varieties known to perform well and to be disease resistant. The trial runs for two years, evaluations start the year of planting and finish the following year so roses only go through one winter season. There are two staggered rose trials planted in San Joaquin County per year.

Roses being tested in the A.R.T.S. trial may be watered thoroughly during the first year after planting for proper establishment during the season they were planted. The roses in the UC Master Gardener of San Joaquin trial are watered 1-inch, twice a week while they are blooming during the first year, and only once a week during the second year.


One single peachy pink double blooming rose and healthy looking leaves on display.
Each rose is evaluated monthly during the growing season; the roses are rated on a 10-point scale, judging them for their foliage, flowers and plant form. (Photo credit: Marcy Sousa)
Each rose is evaluated twice monthly during the growing season by a team of UC Master Gardener volunteers, the local advisor, or a local rose club member. Evaluators rate the roses on a 10-point scale, judging on foliage, flowers and form. The evaluation data collected is submitted to the A.R.T.S. program for evaluation.


Two woman sitting next to a rose bush, one woman pointing at the plant and holding a cell phone, the other is taking notes about the characteristics of the small young rose in front of them.
UC Master Gardeners of San Joaquin County, Kate Vizcarra and Janet Nimtz, evaluate roses for its foliage, flowers and form. (Photo Credit: Marcy Sousa)
Picking the winners

Any rose cultivar in a given region that scores higher than the average of the standard cultivars and has greater than a 50% survival is given the A.R.T.S. Local Artist Award. Any rose that receives the A.R.T.S. Local Artist award in four or more regions is given the A.R.T.S. Master Rose Award.

Having the A.R.T.S. awards in different regions means that nursery and landscape professionals along with home gardeners can be sure they are selecting plants that will perform well in their gardens. Not every plant is going to thrive in every climate. While a particular cultivar may do well in the short, cool growing season of Maine, it may perform very poorly in the much longer and warmer conditions found in California.

We are excited about the opportunity to participate in the program and are eager to find out the winners in our region. Follow us on Facebook @ucsjmg to hear about the winners from us.

Soon, the UC Master Gardener Program in San Joaquin County will begin prepping the ground to install a brand new trial in January 2020!

If you would like to learn more about the A.R.T.S. program, visit their website: https://www.trustedroses.com. If you have a gardening related question, you can contact the UC Master Gardeners at 209-953-6112. More information can be found on our website: ucanr.edu/sjmg.

Information for this article was taken from the A.R.T.S. website and Nursery Management magazine.
[Last edited by Mustbnuts - Dec 18, 2019 7:52 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2123358 (15)
Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
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Mustbnuts
Dec 18, 2019 8:28 AM CST
Here is another interesting article
http://plant-quest.blogspot.co...

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