Plant ID forum: Virgina Creeper (?)

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Vancouver (Canada)
JoeB3
Dec 10, 2019 1:00 PM CST
Hi everyone,

I was hoping you could help me out with my plant. I'm unsure if it just doesn't like the winter months, if I am doing something wrong, or if it's diseased. It seemed to be doing a bit better when the weather was warmer but I'm not sure. Here is a picture to show how it looks: it's dropping a lot of it's leaves. The dark bits you may see on the leaves are just bits of soil. I repotted the plant about a month ago.
Thumb of 2019-12-10/JoeB3/641a19

Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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porkpal
Dec 10, 2019 2:54 PM CST
It could be Virginia Creeper which is deciduous. Here the leaves often turn a brilliant red before they drop in the fall. If that is the case, it should leaf out again in the spring. However I have never seen it grown as a house plant so...?
Porkpal
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
He who dies with the most toys wins
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BigBill
Dec 10, 2019 3:21 PM CST
I agree with porkpal. It does lose its leaves and go dormant over the winter.
Maybe it is not doing as well for you because it prefers to grow outside in rich, well draining soil. Maybe it does not want to be a house plant.
The key to orchid growing is to match the orchid to your conditions.
Vancouver (Canada)
JoeB3
Dec 10, 2019 3:54 PM CST
porkpal said:It could be Virginia Creeper which is deciduous. Here the leaves often turn a brilliant red before they drop in the fall. If that is the case, it should leaf out again in the spring. However I have never seen it grown as a house plant so...?


Yes, I'm not sure... I got given this as a housewarming gift from a friend and was unsure what kind of plant it was. I did some research and it looks like a virgina creeper to me but I'm not sure! Thanks for the reply's:)
Name: Rick R.
Minneapolis, MN, USA zone 4
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
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Leftwood
Dec 10, 2019 7:34 PM CST
Virginia creeper is a woody vine. Each of the five leaf groups and the first stem part that they are connected to will not be woody, but the older parts of the central vine stems nearer to the soil should show signs of woodiness. The undersides of the leaves might have some detectable very fine hairs, but all other surfaces of a Virginia Creeper are smooth, not hairy or fuzzy. I see fuzzy stems on your plant.

I don't think it is Virginia Creeper.
When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the losers. - Socrates
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
He who dies with the most toys wins
Region: United States of America Critters Allowed Growing under artificial light Echinacea Hostas Region: Michigan
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BigBill
Dec 10, 2019 7:47 PM CST
Virginia Creeper grows outdoors and would be thicker, stronger, a heavier vine if outdoors. Indoors, it would be a more slender specimen. Indoors in no way would it ever get to be sturdy.

I have seen sections of poison ivy vine get real woody! I have seen them easily reach 3-5" thick! Virginia Creeper from my experience barely gets an inch thick in terms of its thickest stems.
This is Virginia Creeper in my mind, I have seen them with leaflets numbering between 5-9. Virginia Creeper leaves have large saw teeth like edges. This specimen is weak because of being grown indoors, not because it is really something else.
The key to orchid growing is to match the orchid to your conditions.
[Last edited by BigBill - Dec 10, 2019 7:48 PM (+)]
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Georgia (Zone 8a)
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Hamwild
Dec 10, 2019 8:26 PM CST
Does Virginia Creeper have hairs on it like that? I don't recall ours having hair.
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
He who dies with the most toys wins
Region: United States of America Critters Allowed Growing under artificial light Echinacea Hostas Region: Michigan
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BigBill
Dec 10, 2019 8:45 PM CST
My eyes aren't young enough to see hairs! Rolling on the floor laughing
I don't remember any hairs.
And JoeB3, you may want to plant that outside either in the yard along a fenceline or in a container. Virginia Creeper is a fantastic wildlife plant. It makes loose clusters of deep purple berries the size of a green pea.
The berries are favorites of thrushes like the Wood and Hermit Thrush, Catbird, Robins, Brown Thrashers, White-throats, etc.
I learned of its imporatce in a Wildlife Management class while in college @ SUNY Syracuse. The first full time position I got was at a small preserve on Long Island. I ordered in from a wholesale nursery and the birds helped spread it around. In the Fall, the songbirds flocked to Virginia Creeper thickets for the thousands of berries. It is amazing how so many memories come storming back as we get older! Virginia Creeper holds a special place in my heart ♥️💜

I have to add some to my property this coming spring.
The key to orchid growing is to match the orchid to your conditions.
[Last edited by BigBill - Dec 10, 2019 8:47 PM (+)]
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Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Dec 10, 2019 8:53 PM CST
My first thought was that it reminded me somewhat of Cissus (Cissus adenopoda) which has pubescent (velvety, hairy) leaves but I really don't know.

edited to add: Forget that one, it has 3 leaflets, not 5. The leaf shape of your plant does resemble Parthenocissus; I wonder if there is a variety with pubescent leaves?

~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


[Last edited by plantladylin - Dec 10, 2019 8:58 PM (+)]
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Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
Dec 10, 2019 9:17 PM CST
Yes, I am not convinced that it actually is Virginia Creeper either. I hope someone has a better ID.
Porkpal
Name: Rick R.
Minneapolis, MN, USA zone 4
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Seed Starter Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Leftwood
Dec 10, 2019 10:50 PM CST
Hamwild said:Does Virginia Creeper have hairs on it like that? I don't recall ours having hair.


Thanks for reiterating a point I made, Hamwild. I always try to make a case for my opinions with facts. But if I make more than one point, people always seem to latch on to just one and toss the others out the window. Thank You!
When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the losers. - Socrates
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Cactus and Succulents
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Hamwild
Dec 11, 2019 8:33 AM CST
Leftwood said:

Thanks for reiterating a point I made, Hamwild. I always try to make a case for my opinions with facts. But if I make more than one point, people always seem to latch on to just one and toss the others out the window. Thank You!


You're welcome. I think. Smiling
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
Dec 11, 2019 9:49 AM CST
So what is it?
Porkpal
Missouri (Zone 6a)
Frillylily
Dec 11, 2019 9:59 AM CST
I have VC in my yard and it is not hairy.
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
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plantladylin
Dec 11, 2019 11:06 AM CST
I've seen lots of Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) in the past 50+ years but none with hairy leaves or stems.

~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
Dec 11, 2019 4:29 PM CST
We need an expert on hairy vines.
Porkpal
Perthshire. SCOTLAND. UK
Region: United Kingdom Garden Photography Plant Identifier
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Silversurfer
Dec 11, 2019 5:20 PM CST
Could it possibly be a young shrub?
No evidence of tendrils or climbing.

Could it be Eleutherococcus /E.sieboldianus????
Struggling to get hard facts about young plants.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

Can I see thorns?
Thumb of 2019-12-11/Silversurfer/b772e7

[Last edited by Silversurfer - Dec 11, 2019 5:25 PM (+)]
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Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
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ViburnumValley
Dec 11, 2019 5:35 PM CST
Here is some information to peruse:

https://www.minnesotawildflowe... Good MN description of native Parthenocissus sp.

I suspect it is something tender - at least to us in the non-balmy Ohio River Valley region...

John
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
Dec 11, 2019 9:28 PM CST
Parthenocissus inserta (Woodbine) doesn't sound hairy enough but otherwise could be a match.
Porkpal
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
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plantladylin
Dec 12, 2019 10:08 AM CST
Here's our database entry for Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus vitacea) - synonym P. inserta
~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


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