Plant ID forum→No one knows what this tree is...

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Australia
thingfishs
Jan 4, 2020 2:52 AM CST
I have come across two of these trees, and two plant "experts" haven't been able to identify it. I am in Australia, but I'm confident that it's not an Australian tree. Any ideas?
Thanks,
Ryan.
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(I can take additional photos of specific features if required).
[Last edited by thingfishs - Jan 4, 2020 4:59 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2131815 (1)
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jan 4, 2020 11:39 AM CST
Welcome!

Have you see them bloom or any signs of seed pods? When you crush a leaf, does it have an odor? It reminds me of something...
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Australia
thingfishs
Jan 4, 2020 7:16 PM CST
Thanks for your reply Daisy,
I haven't seen them flower yet, but I haven't been around either tree for a whole year.
The leaves have no odour when crushed.
I couldn't see any buds/flowers/pods on the tree, but I found some old receptacles? underneath the tree (pictured, but which I cannot guarantee is from the same tree, but is likely to be).
Thanks, Ryan
Also the leaves have started to turn orange? (pictured) Isn't early January a bit early for Autumn leaves? Although we have had a heatwave lately, perhaps this could've had an impact...?


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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Jan 4, 2020 9:15 PM CST
Hopefully someone will have a light bulb moment. I'm drawing a blank.

The leaves look like an apple but the stems look like elderberry. I was leaning toward poplar or cottonwood but, if those are the right fruits, all my thoughts are completely wrong.

You may have to watch this tree for awhile and add photos (to this thread) as new things happen: flowers and fresh fruits would be wonderful!
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
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ViburnumValley
Jan 5, 2020 7:41 PM CST
Those look like Amelanchier sp. - and those fruit (not supplied in the posting on the OTHER website) fit with Serviceberry.

Some additional images of the buds, undersides of the leaves, and any other information will always help.

The striated bark on the multistemmed plant fits very well with Amelanchier sp. - a popular member of Rosaceae in eastern North America landscapes.

If you get to them in time, the fruit is very tasty - much like a blueberry.

Leaves can turn color early, often due to droughty stresses. But you wouldn't be having anything like that in Australia, would you...

John
Australia
thingfishs
Jan 6, 2020 6:23 PM CST
Thanks, yes, Amelanchier seems to be the leading contender. I will get a shot of the underside of the leaves a little later today - I want as definite an identification as possible.
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
ViburnumValley
Jan 6, 2020 6:41 PM CST
Very clear closeup images of buds - especially on young growth extensions of the season - should provide good positive ID as well.

Look around for more of the spent reproductive parts that are less decomposed. The Serviceberry fruit should show all the typical parts of a Rosaceae member fruit.

You haven't noted where in Australia you are observing these plants. Tell us!

On that OTHER website, there are good entries with quality images in their PlantFiles database - including quite a few from a contributor from Australia/New Zealand, which may align better with what you are looking at and evaluating.

Here are some Plants Database entries for Amelanchier sp.

Juneberry (Amelanchier canadensis)

Serviceberry (Amelanchier x grandiflora 'Autumn Brilliance')

Allegheny Serviceberry (Amelanchier laevis)

John
Australia
thingfishs
Jan 8, 2020 5:55 AM CST
Okay, here are some additional images: 1: underside of a leaf, 2: some early Autumnal leaves?, plus I pulled out my macro lens for a 3: closer shot of a "less decomposed spent reproductive part" (which this time had attached leaves so I am certain they are from the same tree) and 4: a closeup of a new leaf bud (terrible white balance but presumably still okay info-wise).
I am in Adelaide (Southern Australia - temperate climate).
Hope some of this helps, cheers.

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Oh, and thank you John for all the info you posted there - it would be nice to be able to determine exactly what it is.

[Last edited by thingfishs - Jan 8, 2020 5:59 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2134257 (8)
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
ViburnumValley
Jan 10, 2020 5:32 PM CST
You are quite welcome, Ryan. I am only sorry that you dismembered the specimen before displaying its component parts...

If you are still willing to continue this combat: this time, clip off a branch that has some new growth on it. A section maybe a meter long would be adequate, and that should likely have new green tips (as shown) as well as maybe some new buds at the base of leaves that will be next year's leaves/flowers and new growth extension. That picture of the green tip/bud appears to have more leaves attached lower (but out of camera range) that are more mature and have more mature dormant buds. Oh, the suspense!

Older growth (woodier) than this green tip should certainly have some buds on it - as well as ID indicators like more mature bark with lenticels (maybe) and other characteristics associated with the species like bud scars and leaf scars. Oooo, we are getting in deeper now.

The array of colorful leaves show all the hallmarks of Rosaceae ravages - the insect damage and disease defects that members of this family are famous for. If you displayed too many "clean" leaves, one would suspect you of cheating.

All of this coaxing isn't solely to help you properly ID the plant. I also hope to coach others in providing ID information in an orderly manner, and also to learn something about how plants are put together - and what all those parts are called.

I was never classically or formally trained in horticulture or botany, but by observation and dogged interest I learned these things. Now, online, one can see and learn these things from around the world - especially if provided good images of all the right parts.
John

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