Plant ID forum→Type of Spruce?

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Radford, Virginia
AdamSch
Jan 21, 2020 9:27 AM CST
Can someone tell by these pictures what sort of spruce this is? I keep landing on weeping Norway, or weeping White but i'm not sure
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Aussie.
Grow your future.
Foliage Fan
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lordfungii
Jan 22, 2020 3:54 AM CST
Hey there.
I am guessing this tree is related to the grey conifers within the united states.
I would have to give you a rough guess but I can look into it for you.

Conifer or pine tree or spruce tree.

I will get back to you.

Okay it looks like to me it's a spruce as there are many different colours of them.

Picea glauca is another variety.
Or picea standishii another variety.
All related to pine trees. Hope that helps. 👍
Pot pig.cuttings propagator.
[Last edited by lordfungii - Jan 22, 2020 4:03 AM (+)]
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Name: Rick R.
Minneapolis, MN, USA zone 4
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Seed Starter Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Leftwood
Jan 22, 2020 1:49 PM CST
By the cones visible on the pics, it cannot be a white spruce of any kind. White spruce cones are usually 1.5 to 2 inches long. Norway spruce is a European tree commonly grown in the USA and that's what it looks like to me. It tends to always have weeping secondary branches, and there are forms that are less so, and also more so than the pics you show.
When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the losers. - Socrates
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
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ViburnumValley
Jan 22, 2020 10:06 PM CST
Agree that this is a Picea abies. It is NOT the selection Picea abies 'Pendula'.
John
Radford, Virginia
AdamSch
Jan 23, 2020 3:13 PM CST
Leftwood said:By the cones visible on the pics, it cannot be a white spruce of any kind. White spruce cones are usually 1.5 to 2 inches long. Norway spruce is a European tree commonly grown in the USA and that's what it looks like to me. It tends to always have weeping secondary branches, and there are forms that are less so, and also more so than the pics you show.



I am pretty certain now it is, too. I feel part of the problem with this is that these trees are not very healthy, and it's hard to get any decent photo of them. But they bear a remarkable similarity to other trees in the immediate area and they all seem to be Norway Spruce too. Thanks for the reply
Name: Rick R.
Minneapolis, MN, USA zone 4
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Seed Starter Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
Leftwood
Jan 23, 2020 5:50 PM CST
They seem pretty healthy to me. It's just that the other trees' leaves shade the spruces in the growing season (when it counts), so growth is rather thin. It's a good thing Norway spruce is quite shade tolerant for an evergreen. Most other evergreens (including spruces) would look a lot worse in the same situation.
When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the losers. - Socrates
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
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ViburnumValley
Jan 25, 2020 11:33 AM CST
Any of those trees would receive a health boost by removal and eradication of the climbing vines evident in your last photo. Big thick heavy English Ivy vines (Hedera helix) that grow up into the crown of these trees will create unnoticed problems affecting stability and longevity.

If these are YOUR trees, you should sever those vines low on the trunk, and plan to kill them off.
John

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