Daylilies forum: daylily SEEDS

Views: 311, Replies: 10 » Jump to the end
Name: DAVID or PRUUNR RETALLICK
MILLBROOK ONTARIO CANADA (Zone 5b)
ODS MEMBER & BACKYARD HYBRIDIZER
Region: Canadian Plant and/or Seed Trader Lilies Irises Hybridizer Hostas
Echinacea Daylilies Composter Cut Flowers Bulbs Vegetable Grower
Image
DAVIDRETALLICK
Feb 25, 2020 8:01 PM CST
I purchased some expensive seeds on the LILY AUCTION.
Took them out of the fridge and placed them in damp paper towels in sealed snack bags, put them on trays with bottom heat, just like the pros say to do.
I started them the first of FEBUARY. only have 3 showing green and a few more have broken the seed coating. The rest look very contented to just be plump black and slick.
Am I just asking too much of the too soon? Should I just take them and pot them up in potting soil.
I have read your comments and I put all the ones not germinated back ,wet into the fridge.
[Last edited by DAVIDRETALLICK - Feb 27, 2020 12:53 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2164883 (1)
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Feb 26, 2020 9:53 PM CST
No moisture in the refrigerator? Cold stratification is cold damp, not just cold. The seeds should have been on the damp paper towels in the refrigerature for a couple months. Hopefully, most will eventually break dormancy.

I hope you realize seeds don't come true to the parent plant.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Feb 27, 2020 11:27 AM CST
Daisy is correct, if the seeds have seed dormancy (which daylily seeds often do) then damp refrigeration will cause them all to germinate at the same time once they come out of the fridge. Otherwise some will take their time, sometimes several weeks or even months. I would be inclined to pot them up at this point. Hopefully the sealed bags are big enough and have enough air in them that the seeds are able to get enough oxygen?
[Last edited by sooby - Feb 27, 2020 11:29 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2165723 (3)
Name: Tim
West Chicago, IL (Zone 5a)
Daylilies Native Plants and Wildflowers Vegetable Grower
Image
Lyshack
Feb 27, 2020 11:28 AM CST
I store the seeds from my summer picking or ones I bought in the refrigerator dry, no moisture. Then 4 weeks before I want to plant them, I add a damp paper towel and put them back in the refrigerator.

Then, in four weeks, I take them out and plant them in my starter pots and put them under the lights. I don't use a heating pad for daylily seeds, but I will use them for plants that would be annuals in my world, like violas or something like that. My basement is probably 60-65 degrees, so it's warm enough on its own.

However, stratification is not required for daylily seeds, I don't think. You could pot them and expect most of them to germinate in 4-8 weeks. Or you could redampen your paper towels and put your whole trays in the refrigerator for 3 weeks, and then pot them.

Edited:
to correct possible steps you can take.
[Last edited by Lyshack - Feb 27, 2020 11:47 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2165724 (4)
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
Image
Seedfork
Feb 27, 2020 11:42 AM CST
Yes, that is my understanding also. I read a post the other day were the poster said they did not stratify their seeds being they were northern grown plants and were dormants and therefore they did not feel they would require stratification. But I think the poster had seed dormancy and plant dormancy mixed up. Of course not all daylily seeds need to be stratified, it's just that is is very hard to know before hand which ones do need to be stratified and which ones don't. I have done seeds both ways, with stratification and without, and I do think the main advantage is it promotes the seeds to germinate mostly at the same time, instead of being spread out over a period of days or weeks. I do not remember ever using bottom heat for daylily seeds, but I am not aware that it does any harm either.
I get uneasy when it takes seeds longer than one month to sprout, but I have had some to take as long as two months, maybe even a little more.
Name: Dennis
SW Michigan (Zone 5a)
Daylilies
Image
Dennis616
Feb 27, 2020 12:19 PM CST
As said you've got 2 options—pot them up, keep them moist, and wait an unknown amount of time (possibly months) for them to sprout. Or re-do the stratification (cold damp) for a few weeks or so and then plant them.

I never heard of the bottom-heating step for seeds. Intriguing!

@Lyshack Tim, you only stratify for 4 weeks? I thought 6-7 weeks was optimal. 4 weeks works for you ok?

@sooby, I used to stratify in unsealed bags but this year I sealed the bags. I like to experiment... Is there really a chance they'll be oxygen starved? I didn't think that would be an issue but now I'm worried!
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Feb 27, 2020 1:00 PM CST
Dennis616 said:

sooby, I used to stratify in unsealed bags but this year I sealed the bags. I like to experiment... Is there really a chance they'll be oxygen starved? I didn't think that would be an issue but now I'm worried!


It was just an extra thought I had, because seeds do need oxygen for respiration when germinating and if someone had used very small bags with more than a handful of seeds, and maybe also flattened them to get the air out (to save space in the fridge?) then one might wonder. But it does sound more as though this problem is one of seed dormancy since some have germinated.


Name: Tim
West Chicago, IL (Zone 5a)
Daylilies Native Plants and Wildflowers Vegetable Grower
Image
Lyshack
Feb 27, 2020 1:06 PM CST
@Dennis616 , I like to experiment a lot. I did 5 weeks three years ago and got great results. Last year I tried 3 weeks and did ok, but there were definitely crosses that didn't break dormancy and took 6 weeks or so. This year I went back to 4 weeks. I'm sitting at 70% germination at 2.5 weeks. Additionally, I've read people who wait to see signs of germination before ending stratification. Not me. I do everything at once. I have planted a lot of seeds that I expect to have low rates as an experiment this year. Normally I would expect stragglers to get me to 80-85%, but I think this year I'll be lucky to get 73-75%.
[Last edited by Lyshack - Feb 27, 2020 1:09 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2165778 (8)
Name: Valerie
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Irises Roses Peonies Butterflies Birds
Bee Lover Region: Canadian Ponds Garden Art Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Image
touchofsky
Feb 27, 2020 1:47 PM CST
I do 4 weeks, too. Sometimes, I will have full germination at three weeks, and I bring them into the warmth in that case, but usually I leave them the full 4 weeks, and only see a few seeds in some pots germinating early.

Btw, I plant my seeds directly into pots of dampened potting soil and I then put the pots in my unheated basement for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks, I then bring them upstairs to germinate at room temperature.
Touch_of_sky on the LA
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Feb 27, 2020 1:56 PM CST
Lyshack said:@Dennis616 , I like to experiment a lot. I did 5 weeks three years ago and got great results. Last year I tried 3 weeks and did ok, but there were definitely crosses that didn't break dormancy and took 6 weeks or so. This year I went back to 4 weeks. I'm sitting at 70% germination at 2.5 weeks. Additionally, I've read people who wait to see signs of germination before ending stratification. Not me. I do everything at once. I have planted a lot of seeds that I expect to have low rates as an experiment this year. Normally I would expect stragglers to get me to 80-85%, but I think this year I'll be lucky to get 73-75%.


The length of time to break seed dormancy also depends on the temperature. The optimum range for stratification is 32-50F (0-10C) but the duration of time needed is shorter at the lower end than the upper. My fridge is fairly cold but I did think that some seeds needed more than 3 weeks even so, so I give them at least 4 weeks.

There is a misconception with some people, as you mentioned, that stratification means germinating in the fridge, which is not correct. The idea of damp chilling is to simulate winter, and then follow up with germination at room temperature to simulate spring.

Name: Dennis
SW Michigan (Zone 5a)
Daylilies
Image
Dennis616
Feb 27, 2020 4:51 PM CST

I like to experiment, and have tried different things with stratification. My first year I got 90%+ germination rate within 10 days of planting. I've gotten steadily worse results ever since! Rolling on the floor laughing

That first year I did 8 weeks so I think I may go back to that. As mentioned, there are a lot of variables so you never know, but you can keep trying until you see what works for you...

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Daylilies forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by chhari55 and is called "Rhodophiala"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.