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Avatar for biliv86
Mar 2, 2020 12:01 PM CST
Thread OP

I'd like to grow some plants indoors like raddish or maybe even strawberries? I just don't know what grow light to choose. I've got three offers that interest me. [url=icantpost://allegro.pl/oferta/zarowka-led-grow-light-do-uprawy-roslin-5w-e27-8419900703?]icantpost://allegro.pl/oferta/...[/url]
[url=icantpost://allegro.pl/oferta/zarowka-led-grow-light-do-uprawy-roslin-20w-e27-8419984339?]icantpost://allegro.pl/oferta/...[/url]
[url=icantpost://allegro.pl/oferta/zarowka-led-e27-grow-10w-do-uprawy-hodowli-roslin-5479783327?]icantpost://allegro.pl/oferta/...[/url]

Are they any good? Is the 15 zł one good at all? Maybe the ikea grow light is better. I'm kinda on a budget.
Thanks for reading!
Last edited by biliv86 Mar 2, 2020 12:15 PM Icon for preview
Avatar for biliv86
Mar 2, 2020 12:02 PM CST
Thread OP

icantpost = www
Sorry
Last edited by biliv86 Mar 2, 2020 12:14 PM Icon for preview
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Mar 2, 2020 1:00 PM CST
Name: Doug
Texas (Zone 8b)
Go spend fifteen bucks on a 2x4-foot T12 fluorescent shop light with daylight bulbs. Grow-lights have slightly optimized spectral coverage, and are lots pricier. You won't notice the difference.
Avatar for biliv86
Mar 2, 2020 1:32 PM CST
Thread OP

DougL said:Go spend fifteen bucks on a 2x4-foot T12 fluorescent shop light with daylight bulbs. Grow-lights have slightly optimized spectral coverage, and are lots pricier. You won't notice the difference.

I just want to try on a small scale, one bulb. It's not in my electronics expertise or in my budget.
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Mar 2, 2020 1:41 PM CST
Name: Doug
Texas (Zone 8b)
For a big-box store shop light, the electronics expertise you need is plugging in a plug, and flipping a switch. If you want one bulb instead of two, just remove one bulb. The shop lights come with two bulbs. Well, here's a T8 one for $18.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Litho...
Last edited by DougL Mar 2, 2020 1:45 PM Icon for preview
Avatar for biliv86
Mar 2, 2020 1:51 PM CST
Thread OP

I really don't have any space. I'm just asking, which LED bulb is better?
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Mar 2, 2020 2:14 PM CST
Name: Doug
Texas (Zone 8b)
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KZKW73S/

... is a 2-foot shop light. Actually, you can find lower intensity LED shop lights for a little more money. But if you want bang-for-the-buck, I'd go fluorescent. The other advantage of fluorescents is that they produce a little heat. That's convenient if you want to keep your plants above room temperature, which will aid growth. You just throw a piece of cloth over the whole thing, and you've got a greenhouse.
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Mar 2, 2020 2:35 PM CST
Name: James
North Louisiana (Zone 8b)
Adeniums Cactus and Succulents Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Growing under artificial light Ferns Garden Photography
Region: Louisiana Region: Gulf Coast Enjoys or suffers hot summers Critters Allowed Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Container Gardener
I agree

fluorescent lighting is the way to go ....LED is not living up to all the hype
Avatar for biliv86
Mar 2, 2020 3:07 PM CST
Thread OP

biliv86 said:I really don't have any space. I'm just asking, which LED bulb is better?

Could you anwser my question? I don't have space for that.
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Mar 2, 2020 3:26 PM CST
Name: James
North Louisiana (Zone 8b)
Adeniums Cactus and Succulents Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Growing under artificial light Ferns Garden Photography
Region: Louisiana Region: Gulf Coast Enjoys or suffers hot summers Critters Allowed Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Container Gardener
what are the dimensions of your space ?
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Mar 2, 2020 3:50 PM CST
Name: Doug
Texas (Zone 8b)
Sounds like you just need ONE BULB with a reflector around it. You can get high wattage (>100W equivalent) LED bulbs, but they are pretty expensive. About $30 each. 150W equivalent compact fluorescents are $15 or so. With a 100W equivalent bulb (which you can get for a few bucks as either LED or compact fluorescent), you can probably have a one square-foot garden. Ten bucks gets you a large clamp-on work light fixture with a decent sized reflector that you can screw that bulb into.

If you want a specific answer to your specific question, a 100W LED bulb you can get at Walmart or even the supermarket is the bulb you probably want, if cost and space are limits.

If you have some prejudice about absolutely needing LEDs, you might tell us your reasoning. In terms of lifetime and energy efficiency, LEDs are nice, but you'll pay for the niceness.
Last edited by DougL Mar 2, 2020 3:55 PM Icon for preview
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Mar 3, 2020 6:00 AM CST
MSP (Zone 4a)
I love my 38w (claimed 45w, runs 37-40) LED panel grow lights. Equivalent to about a 230W incandescent, or higher depending on how much you believe the more dishonest LED bulb sellers that claim a 7w 600 lumen bulb is 60w equivalent. Anyway, I digress.

They weren't that cheap, 25 or 30 dollars on amazon I believe. But they work very well and have very nice light distribution. And they'll last a couple decades at least, CFL and metal halide lamps certainly won't, among their other problems.
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Mar 3, 2020 7:04 AM CST
Name: Ed
South Alabama (Zone 8b)
Garden Procrastinator Region: United States of America Region: Alabama Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tomato Heads Vegetable Grower
Solar Power Bee Lover Birds Seed Starter Butterflies Container Gardener
You can get one of the adapter sockets that look like a "Y" and that converts a single light bulb socket into two sockets. This would double your light. You would possibly need to change the reflector on the light fixture that you use...if you do need a larger reflector one of the mid-sized disposable baking tins (like you would could a pan of stuffing or maybe bake a chicken or small turkey in) could be adapted for a larger reflector. Try the "Y" socket and bulbs first...the original reflector may very well work fine....if you use that setup.

If you are using one of the clamp-on light fixtures I urge you to get one that has a porcelain base to it rather than the plastic base...will hold up better and handles heat much better. The plastic ones are usually termed "work lights" while the porcelain ones are termed "brooder lights". Wallyworld usually/sporadically handles them. Tractor Supply usually has a stock of brooder fixtures.

There are "warm" and "cool" bulbs. Seedlings need both but if you have to choose only one opt for the "cool" ones. Better, though, to combine one of each and maybe turn your tray around each day to equalize the wavelength of the lights on the plants.

I haven't used LED bulbs but it seems they would be better at not damaging/burning the seedlings should they get too close to them.

As for not being electrically knowledgeable, all of this is basically "plug-n-play" technology. Make sure the lamp is well secured so it doesn't fall on your seedlings and damage them and you should be fine. A cheap plug-in dial timer is great for setting light duration. Some white cardboard or maybe even aluminum foil places around the perimeter will throw back a lot of light onto the seedlings that would be wasted light otherwise.

You *cannot* have too much light. Too much heat, yes, you can have to much of that...but not too much LIGHT.

Best wishes on your project! Now to go look at your links. (Yeah, I'm a little backwards.<g>)
Ed
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Mar 3, 2020 7:10 AM CST
Name: Ed
South Alabama (Zone 8b)
Garden Procrastinator Region: United States of America Region: Alabama Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tomato Heads Vegetable Grower
Solar Power Bee Lover Birds Seed Starter Butterflies Container Gardener
Hmmm, I had to look up the domain locations in the links... .pl ....Poland. I'm not sure what to tell you now since you may not have Tractor Supply stores or Walmarts where you are at. All I can say is the higher wattage is better. I don't think these will get hot enough to harm your plants.

Ed

PS: And, welcome to the forum!!!! What are you going to start beneath the lights?
Last edited by Intheswamp Mar 3, 2020 7:11 AM Icon for preview
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Mar 3, 2020 9:01 AM CST
Name: Doug
Texas (Zone 8b)
That Amazon light is a nice one, but I'm skeptical about 230W incandescent equivalent. The mean power consumption of that fixture is 15W. I think that with the right power supply, you can push it to 45W max. But 15W LED is about the equivalent of a 100W incandescent. The online advertisement is not specific about equivalent wattages. Where do you get 230W equivalent? $25 for a 100W LED is a lot.

That's a good point about "y" adapter sockets, but if you use one of those, you'd be hard pressed to get a reflector that would fit with two bulbs underneath. Without a reflector, you'd lose most of the light.
Avatar for biliv86
Mar 3, 2020 9:07 AM CST
Thread OP

Last edited by biliv86 Mar 3, 2020 9:09 AM Icon for preview
Avatar for biliv86
Mar 3, 2020 9:18 AM CST
Thread OP

DougL said:Sounds like you just need ONE BULB with a reflector around it. You can get high wattage (>100W equivalent) LED bulbs, but they are pretty expensive. About $30 each. 150W equivalent compact fluorescents are $15 or so. With a 100W equivalent bulb (which you can get for a few bucks as either LED or compact fluorescent), you can probably have a one square-foot garden. Ten bucks gets you a large clamp-on work light fixture with a decent sized reflector that you can screw that bulb into.

If you want a specific answer to your specific question, a 100W LED bulb you can get at Walmart or even the supermarket is the bulb you probably want, if cost and space are limits.

If you have some prejudice about absolutely needing LEDs, you might tell us your reasoning. In terms of lifetime and energy efficiency, LEDs are nice, but you'll pay for the niceness.

Thank you for the comment!
So should I just judge the wattage? Also I'm confused, can I use a normal light bulb, not a grow light?
Thanks again!
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Mar 3, 2020 10:16 AM CST
MSP (Zone 4a)
DougL said:That Amazon light is a nice one, but I'm skeptical about 230W incandescent equivalent. The mean power consumption of that fixture is 15W. I think that with the right power supply, you can push it to 45W max. But 15W LED is about the equivalent of a 100W incandescent. The online advertisement is not specific about equivalent wattages. Where do you get 230W equivalent? $25 for a 100W LED is a lot.

That's a good point about "y" adapter sockets, but if you use one of those, you'd be hard pressed to get a reflector that would fit with two bulbs underneath. Without a reflector, you'd lose most of the light.



True 60w equivalent LED bulbs usually pull 8 or 9 watts. My panel pulling ~38w means it's about 4.75x the actual power of your standard 60w equivalent LED, 4.75 * 60 = 285w. So 230W is being generous, assuming a 10w LED is equivalent to a 60w (which really it's closer to your standard old 75w bulbs) so multiplying the actual wattage by 6 to get the incandescent equivalent (again being very generous to the incandescents here).

And that's putting aside the fact that the panel is blue/red LEDs so it's putting out something between 15-25% more usable light per watt than your standard full spectrum white bulbs.

It is an extremely bright panel, if it weren't directional it would easily light up a huge living room.
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Mar 3, 2020 10:26 AM CST
Name: Doug
Texas (Zone 8b)
Very generous. If the equivalent wattage for LEDs is 7x the actual wattage, we're talking 105W equivalent for this "mean 15W" fixture. Are you actually measuring 38W consumption for your fixture? Again, the advertisement online about this fixture is VERY unclear about true or equivalent wattage and even the power consumption. I consider such advertising somewhat sneaky.

Re using a "normal", e.g. incandescent light bulb, that's a very bad idea. You need to get the plants close to the light source to intercept the light efficiently, and you'd fry your plants if you did that with an incandescent bulb. Use a CFL or an LED. If you mean "normal" as in *not* a grow-light, the answer is OF COURSE you can use it. Grow-lights are slightly more optimal in their spectral range, but you'd be hard pressed to notice any difference. Not worth the expense, unless maybe you're doing commercial indoor gardening.
Last edited by DougL Mar 3, 2020 10:33 AM Icon for preview
Avatar for biliv86
Mar 3, 2020 10:48 AM CST
Thread OP

DougL said:

Re using a "normal", e.g. incandescent light bulb, that's a very bad idea. You need to get the plants close to the light source to intercept the light efficiently, and you'd fry your plants if you did that with an incandescent bulb. Use a CFL or an LED. If you mean "normal" as in *not* a grow-light, the answer is OF COURSE you can use it. Grow-lights are slightly more optimal in their spectral range, but you'd be hard pressed to notice any difference. Not worth the expense, unless maybe you're doing commercial indoor gardening.


So, no need to buy a "special" grow light if it's a white LED?
Is it not worth it paying 6x the price for them if I want to grow raddishes? If so what's the purpose they make them for? If I'm buying ordinary LED for that purpose what colour should I buy it them? Also what wattage should I buy them?
Last edited by biliv86 Mar 3, 2020 12:18 PM Icon for preview

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