Trees and Shrubs forum→Help needed choosing a shade tree near the house

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Northern NJ
ymg200
Mar 10, 2020 10:52 AM CST
I had two Norway Maples in front of my house which have succumbed to Verticillium Wilt and I had to remove them after they started dropping dead branches. I miss those trees a lot. This side of the house faces West and maples provided so needed shade, especially when the sun is low just before sunset and shines directly into windows. The house looks naked without these trees.
My first choice would have been Maple again (maybe not necessarily Norway), but the bacteria likely remains in the soil, so now my selection is limited to trees that are resistant to Verticillium Wilt and I cannot go with maples anymore.
I am looking for a fast growing shade tree of a medium size (similar to maple) that can be planted near the house. The tree should not have strong or invasive roots that could crush house foundation which is 17 feet away from trees. There are also water, gas and sewage lines going from the curb to the house right under one of those trees.
I am in the Northern NJ (zone 7a).
Thanks a lot!
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California (Zone 9b)
CalPolygardener
Mar 13, 2020 10:37 AM CST
17 feet isn't really all that close to the foundation. You could probably choose any tree that grows to less than 50 feet or so just to be in proportion with the house. Maybe Hornbeam, Sweetbay Magnolia, Ginkgo, Goldenrain Tree(Koelreuteria). Something along those lines. A good resource is Dirr's Encyclopedia of Trees and Shrubs. If you're a plant addict be sure to have some paper towels handy for the drool. Hilarious!
Name: James
North Louisiana (Zone 8b)
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deepsouth
Mar 13, 2020 11:21 AM CST
One choice for the spot you have - might be something that flowers ....

Japanese cherry (Prunus serrulata)
full sun to partial shade and grow about 25 feet tall

I agree 100% - "Dirr's Encyclopedia of Trees and Shrubs" is one the best books out there
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
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ViburnumValley
Mar 15, 2020 8:06 PM CST
If you want a long lived shade tree that doesn't have any susceptibility to Verticillium wilt, then pick an Oak species (Quercus sp.).

For northern NJ, you can grow many selections. You have to decide on dimensions, leaf characteristics, fall color or not, etc. A species that grows relatively quickly is Quercus phellos - Willow Oak. So does Quercus palustris - Pin Oak. There are many other species that will grow perfectly well in your area.
John
Northern NJ
ymg200
Mar 16, 2020 6:48 PM CST
Thanks to all for your suggestions. I have checked out ALL suggested trees and the choice is not as easy. Oaks are too big to grow in proximity to the house, while Hornbeam is smaller than I want it to be (I'm looking for a maple sized tree). I do like Cherry and Magnolia, but they are susceptible to Verticilluim Wilt. Ginko and Koelreuteria are slow growers..... I have gas, water and sewage lines below one of tree spots, so I want to avoid taproots that could damage pipes under them. I'm looking for a tree that's close to maple by size, shape and roots. I came across Honey Locust which is resistant to VW and is fast growing, but it has taproots. At this moment I'm looking at Fruitless White Mulberry. Would a Fruitless White Mulberry be a danger to house foundation or gas/water/sewage communications? I've posted the picture with location of my old maples in my first post.
Name: James
North Louisiana (Zone 8b)
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deepsouth
Mar 16, 2020 7:23 PM CST

Mulberry might work if you can find a dwarf ...but Mulberries have no respect for pipes, sewers, foundations, streets, sidewalks or driveways ...and will be in the power-lines before you know it

your front yard may not be a very good space for most trees ....might want to think dwarf varieties or shrubs

maybe a native red maple might work for you (grown local) ..... natives are more tolerant, perhaps even resistant to many diseases
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
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porkpal
Mar 16, 2020 9:19 PM CST
I don't know whether they grow as far north as you, but Chittamwood trees look a lot like small live oaks and won't crowd your yard.
Porkpal
Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
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crawgarden
Mar 16, 2020 10:04 PM CST
Maybe a Malus (crabapple) would work, just get one that is apple scab resistant, Shade and spring color
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Name: Lee-Roy
Bilzen, Belgium (Zone 8a)
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Arico
Mar 27, 2020 4:00 PM CST
There are quiet a few oak cultivars (and even species) that don't grow that big though. Others I can think of off the top of my head: Betula, Ostrya, Fagus cultivars...

This link might help you out: https://www.vdberk.com/trees/

[Last edited by Arico - Mar 27, 2020 4:00 PM (+)]
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Missouri (Zone 6a)
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Frillylily
Apr 9, 2020 12:05 AM CST
Willow Oak. I love mine. Buy the largest one you can afford. They do grow faster than some of the other types. Also pin oak is a popular faster growing oak that has nice foliage and prettier fall color than some of the others. The Willow Oak btw is not a willow at all, it IS an oak. So no invasive root worries like actual willow trees.

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