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Avatar for pinkruffles
Mar 13, 2020 10:42 AM CST
PA (Zone 6a)
When I start my seeds in a water/peroxide mixture, it normally takes a few days till I see the little white root poking out. Then within a day or 2, I pot them up in a potting mixture. Usually it takes between 4-9 days before I'll see the green plant coming up. This time, with 2 seeds from a cross that I REALLY want, it's been 13 days and still no green!! I am almost tempted to dig them out of their cup and see what's going on... Am I just being too impatient, and does anyone think there's a good chance they'll still pop up?????
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Mar 13, 2020 12:18 PM CST
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
@pinkruffles,
I know I have actually waited two months and had seed sprout, I had them planted in cups in my little protected raised beds and I moved all the cups out except two that had crosses that I did not make but were sent to me. I left those two cups there by themselves because nothing had sprouted in them, but I did not want to give up on them. One of the cups never had anything sprout, the other cup did have several of the seeds to sprout! So If you don't need the space or feel you need to move them for some other reason I would leave them alone. Mine were not sprouted when I planted them.
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Mar 16, 2020 12:23 PM CST
Name: Gerry Donahue
Pleasant Lake, IN (Zone 5b)
Hostas Garden Ideas: Master Level
Larry, good afternoon. Seedfork

More then one members has written about waiting until the seeds sprouts greenery before planting. Is that safe? Is it better than planting seeds when only the white root appears?

Will seedlings do better in room temperature or on heated surface?
I know that they will do better under light.

Thank you,
Gerry
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Mar 16, 2020 1:19 PM CST
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
I have planted pepper and tomato seeds on a heated surface to help them sprout, I have never used a heated surface for daylilies that I can recall. I will say I don't do it anymore if I ever did. But not saying that it would be a bad thing.
I personally would not wait till green leaves are showing, I want to get the germinated seeds under light as quickly as possible just to avoid any chance of them getting tall and thin trying to find light. I am forgetful and life happens so they might not get any attention some days. I want them to be like pepper and tomato plants...stocky and not spindly (thin and weak). So my lights are set right above the cups so the light is available as soon as the leaves break the surface of the soil. Is it safe to wait until green shows...I think it is safe, but you would just have to be careful just like you would have to be when the first root sprouts show so that it is not broken off when transplanting. That is why I like to plant my seed in cups and cover them before they sprout. I don't always manage that because sometimes they actually sprout early in the little baggies. I have over looked some sprouted seed and some that had green showing and they did just fine. If a person is limited for space under the lights, I could see waiting till roots or greenery appears, that way no space is wasted on space that may not even produce a sprouted seed. But people who do that might have some other reasons, I don't know of any reason that would be better, but people have reasons for doing things
differently.
Edited to add:
Commercial growers use green houses for a reason, our guest speaker at our club meeting this week was from Georgia and he has a friend with a large green house. The friend lets him grow his seedlings in the green house and instead of having to wait two and maybe three years for a bloom he gets a large majority of bloom now in one year. So maybe not a heated surface but certainly growing under controlled temps helps speed up the process. Of course in the green house the watering and the fertilizing along with the temperature is well managed.
Last edited by Seedfork Mar 16, 2020 5:19 PM Icon for preview
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Mar 16, 2020 2:15 PM CST
Name: Gerry Donahue
Pleasant Lake, IN (Zone 5b)
Hostas Garden Ideas: Master Level
Thank you, Larry. This is really good information.

I live in a microclimate that is on the cusp of zone 4. I have a greenhouse in great need of repaired insulation. Until that is repaired, growing anything in it is out of the question. When it becomes solar heated, mid April, I do all my germinating and growing indoors.

Again, thank you.
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