Roses forum→Spider Mites on Mini Indoor Rose

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Name: Blue
Oregon (Zone 8b)
Gchum
Apr 1, 2020 5:32 PM CST
My mini rose was beginning to discolor and I noticed small, light webbing around one or two stems. I quickly did research and discovered the plant had minimal spider mites. I resorted to spraying the Rose with a mister under every underside and topside of the leaves. I did this multiple times. The plant is now wet with mist droplets all over. (I also gently shook the plant to avoid water buildup around the edges of the leaves.) From what I can see, the mites look gone. However, I'm sure there are a few left as they are small and I'm sure I missed them.

I also have the Rose some fertilizer as a pick me up since she was beginning to discolor.

What are some tips to eliminating these mites? Are there any other care/after care tips? Thank you!
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Apr 1, 2020 8:15 PM CST
We came from here:

The thread "Discoloration on indoor Mini Rose" in Roses forum
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Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
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gardenfish
Apr 2, 2020 7:19 AM CST
As far as I know, no mini roses are bred to be houseplants. Yes, they are sold as such in grocery stores, but they are very much happier to be grown outside. I would move it outside, and keep it isolated from other plants until you are sure it has no more mites. Spider mites aren't usually found in the house; your plant may have had them when you purchased it, or if you have had it outside recently, got them from another outside plant. Mini roses can be grown inside but require special conditions to flourish and grow lights set up for them. I saw a description of one Gardeners growing instructions for mini roses indoors, it was so complicated one has to wonder why anyone would bother when they do so well planted in the outside garden.
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Name: Blue
Oregon (Zone 8b)
Gchum
Apr 2, 2020 1:13 PM CST
gardenfish said:As far as I know, no mini roses are bred to be houseplants. Yes, they are sold as such in grocery stores, but they are very much happier to be grown outside. I would move it outside, and keep it isolated from other plants until you are sure it has no more mites. Spider mites aren't usually found in the house; your plant may have had them when you purchased it, or if you have had it outside recently, got them from another outside plant. Mini roses can be grown inside but require special conditions to flourish and grow lights set up for them. I saw a description of one Gardeners growing instructions for mini roses indoors, it was so complicated one has to wonder why anyone would bother when they do so well planted in the outside garden.


I have actually had great luck with this plant and had it for awhile now - no extra care needed! The rose has had plenty of blooms and many new growths Smiling My window faces directly east and I get plenty of strong sun. Its very healthy minus the current infest. My main concern are the mites and the after care it needs for recovery. Do you have any tips for this? Thanks!

Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
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gardenfish
Apr 2, 2020 2:21 PM CST
It's great that the Rose is doing good inside, so many don't do well. Have you tried Neem oil?I would say to apply as directed. The sun you have is great. The biggest problem with these for inside is lack of sufficient light.
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Apr 2, 2020 2:29 PM CST
How long have you had your Rose? Did you force it to go dormant? Roses need dormancy, even inside roses.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Blue
Oregon (Zone 8b)
Gchum
Apr 2, 2020 3:07 PM CST
gardenfish said:It's great that the Rose is doing good inside, so many don't do well. Have you tried Neem oil?I would say to apply as directed. The sun you have is great. The biggest problem with these for inside is lack of sufficient light.


I have not, truthfully I'm unaware of what Neem Oil is - I'll look into it. And yes, the light has been great - but I might resort to supplemented lighting as the last few days have been rainy. Thank you for the advice! Thank You!
Name: Blue
Oregon (Zone 8b)
Gchum
Apr 2, 2020 3:11 PM CST
DaisyI said:How long have you had your Rose? Did you force it to go dormant? Roses need dormancy, even inside roses.


Have not even thought about that - thank you! I have only had the rose for about two months. I would assume its not dormant considering the last bloom was about a few weeks ago. I've deadheaded the dried blooms since then and currently its spouting tons new leaves. I'm unfamiliar with the process of forcing dormancy. Ill research it - and any tips are welcome. Smiling Smiling
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Growmore
Apr 2, 2020 3:20 PM CST
Hello Gchum and welcome to the forum. I have always used methylated spirit to get rid of red spider mite, mealy bug and wooly aphid. Simply apply direct using a cotton bud.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Apr 2, 2020 5:37 PM CST
Rubbing alcohol will do the same and is probably easier to find. Smiling
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Blue
Oregon (Zone 8b)
Gchum
Apr 2, 2020 7:02 PM CST
Growmore said:Hello Gchum and welcome to the forum. I have always used methylated spirit to get rid of red spider mite, mealy bug and wooly aphid. Simply apply direct using a cotton bud.


Perfect - thank you so much! Smiling
Name: Blue
Oregon (Zone 8b)
Gchum
Apr 2, 2020 7:03 PM CST
DaisyI said:Rubbing alcohol will do the same and is probably easier to find. Smiling


Great, I have some. Thank you for all the help! Thank You!
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Apr 2, 2020 7:22 PM CST
Ummmm.... Good luck buying that. Rubbing alcohol is essentially the same thing. We don't usually recommend alcohol to kill spider mites as they are easily controlled by washing the plant in soapy water.

Two months... That's about the right timing for your Rose to decide indoor life is not for it. I'm sure it was forced (as you bought it blooming when it should have been dormant), that takes a toll on vitality also. I'm impressed you kept it happy for this long.

The discoloration on the leaves of your rose is a direct result of indoor life. Time to move it out to the deck..
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Blue
Oregon (Zone 8b)
Gchum
Apr 2, 2020 7:29 PM CST
DaisyI said:Ummmm.... Good luck buying that. Rubbing alcohol is essentially the same thing. We don't usually recommend alcohol to kill spider mites as they are easily controlled by washing the plant in soapy water.

Two months... That's about the right timing for your Rose to decide indoor life is not for it. I'm sure it was forced (as you bought it blooming when it should have been dormant), that takes a toll on vitality also. I'm impressed you kept it happy for this long.

The discoloration on the leaves of your rose is a direct result of indoor life. Time to move it out to the deck..


I'm keeping it inside, but thanks. It gets plenty of direct light from my East facing porch as well as supplemented light during rainy days. It's very healthy and happy - hence all the new blooms and growths. I've discovered the spots came from nutrition deficiency and spider mites! Not sun deficiency.

Name: Suzanne/Sue
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Calif_Sue
Apr 2, 2020 9:14 PM CST

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A rose expect also answered you in the previous thread (Daisy linked it above) you posted regarding this same rose.

East windows are often good for plants that need moderate sunlight or morning sunlight only. Supplemental indoor light is not enough, roses need full sun. Your blooms and growth in the two months you had it were from the care it got prior to your purchase, as Daisy mentioned.
It's very healthy and happy - hence all the new blooms and growths.


Actually it's not very happy or healthy, hence, the spider mites. Also, those potted roses do not require supplemental fertilizer, they have all they need in the potting soil they came in, in fact, fertilizing an ailing plant can be a detriment.


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[Last edited by Calif_Sue - Apr 2, 2020 9:15 PM (+)]
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Name: Blue
Oregon (Zone 8b)
Gchum
Apr 2, 2020 9:43 PM CST
Calif_Sue said: A rose expect also answered you in the previous thread (Daisy linked it above) you posted regarding this same rose.

East windows are often good for plants that need moderate sunlight or morning sunlight only. Supplemental indoor light is not enough, roses need full sun. Your blooms and growth in the two months you had it were from the care it got prior to your purchase, as Daisy mentioned.


Actually it's not very happy or healthy, hence, the spider mites. Also, those potted roses do not require supplemental fertilizer, they have all they need in the potting soil they came in, in fact, fertilizing an ailing plant can be a detriment.




I see you are concerned, I can appreciate the sentiment. Many mini roses successfully grow indoor roses from beginner to experienced gardeners - I've seen it! Smiling Perhaps it's more work but I enjoy the process. The blooms are from my doing actually! All of the growths are stemming from deadheaded stems - the plant would not support such mass growth if it were unhappy Smiling My house has a professional indoor grow room as my family consists of educated gardeners - so yes, this rose receives plenty of support. Not to mention this Rose was bred for indoor quarters by a well established nursery. I agree - fertilizing an ailing plant can be harmful, but gentle and organic fertilizer can also promote sustainability regardless of the plant. I've found great luck in that through my past experience. I have both a easy and south facing window! It sits at the East during cool night and I transfer it to the bright and warm south window during the morning through evening. The plant is not on its deathbed and has thrived in its spot and will continue to. Thumbs up

As of now the Rose has minimal spider mites - completely normal! Most likely transferred from another plant. Happens to many mini roses, it's very common and usually caused by environment - not the gardeners doing Smiling . Regardless, the Rose has strong leaves, roots and stems (minus the infected ones which are being treated) and is producing more happy baby leaves. It will remain inside as many other gardeners of mini roses do Smiling

Every Gardener has different methods and techniques - as each environment and plant is a little bit different. These all should be respected. Take care all Thank You!
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
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porkpal
Apr 2, 2020 10:09 PM CST
Congratulations on your rose. It is difficult to keep an indoor plant as happy as yours seems to be. Let us know how it progresses - pictures when it blooms would be great.
Porkpal
Name: Blue
Oregon (Zone 8b)
Gchum
Apr 2, 2020 10:16 PM CST
porkpal said:Congratulations on your rose. It is difficult to keep an indoor plant as happy as yours seems to be. Let us know how it progresses - pictures when it blooms would be great.


Thank you! Indoor mini roses can be quite the controversial topic - but the challenge is very rewarding as I've learned a lot and have been surprised by its durability Smiling Thank you all for the advice! Group hug I'll take each to heart and try to adjust it to outdoor quarters once the rain clears and see the effect! I'll update soon, thank you again Smiling
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
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RoseBlush1
Apr 2, 2020 11:00 PM CST
Grace ..

You have been given excellent advice about roses not being indoor plants. It is totally impossible to breed a rose to be an indoor plant. Rose genetics just don't work that way.

Generally humidity and air circulation play a role, as well as insufficient light or reflective light from a window mentioned by others in their posts above, in causing roses grown indoors to fail. You must also be compensating for these variables.

Rose literature often mentions spider mite issues for roses "grown under glass." Spider mites like warm, dry conditions. Just washing your plant is sufficient to keep them at bay. If you have a serious infestation, washing it very thoroughly three days in a row will break the breeding cycle. Then washing it once a week should be sufficient to manage any future infestations.

btw ... if your temps are not too cold, your rose would love to be outside in the rain.

Edited to correct typo
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
[Last edited by RoseBlush1 - Apr 2, 2020 11:57 PM (+)]
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Name: Joy
Calgary Alberta (Zone 4a)
javgallowa
Apr 4, 2020 1:40 PM CST
Hi!
Decades ago I grew lots of mini roses under basement lights and supplied a few to a garden centre. I still pick up the occasional plant(s) in winter. They thrive in a south planter window. These go to the garden in summer, only because I live out there:)

It's very dry here, so spider mite sporadically became a problem.

What worked for me follows. I hope it helps. Enjoy:)

1) Spray all leaves/stems above and below under a cold water tap, to treat and/or prevent spider mite.
2) Ensure good air circulation to let them dry off well (fan or warm breeze, whatever works for you).
3) Prune when required to direct growth and allow air circulation. They are tough. If most leaves had to be removed or
fell off, most plants will sprout new growth.
4) Water well until water drains out, after first allowing the soil to dry out.
5) Fertilize regularly. Water with plain non-chlorinated water in between.
6) Mini roses require a lot of light.
[Last edited by javgallowa - Apr 4, 2020 1:43 PM (+)]
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